Categories
CSL News

Call for Program Review Volunteers (CALCON)

We are approaching the deadline for CALCON 2019 program submission(MARCH 1st – no extensions this year!) 

We need program reviewers, the more the merrier!  The CALCON planning committee voted to arrange the programs for review by topic.  The submissions will be divided up into 5 review groups of 30 – 35 proposals each.  Most proposals are 1 to 2 pages each.  Reviewers will be given access to an online rubric that will be filled out for each submission.  This paperless process will need to be done from March 4 to March 22 in the comfort of your own space.

If you are able, please take a moment to volunteer.  It’s ok if you are submitting a session, we will just put you into a different evaluation group.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Amber Cox and Tiah Frankish: Program Committee Co-Chairs

We would also like to request that each association, division, and interest group have a voice at the table when we are selecting the final program on March 26th at the Adams 12 Educational Services Center.  It is a full day commitment. 9 to 4.

What we need from you:  Please send us the name of the one person from your association, division or interest group that will be attending the program selection day on March 26th.

Amber Cox and Tiah Frankish: Program Committee Co-Chairs

Categories
Learning

Deadline for CALCON Session Proposals is Coming Soon!

Colorado Association of Libraries Presenting is great for professional development, helping to build strengths in interpersonal communication, presentation skills, and more. But even beyond that, it’s an opportunity to share experiences, tips and techniques with colleagues across the state. So whether you’ve never presented, or it’s your 5th time, think about the awesome things you’ve accomplished this past year and shape it into a CALCON 2019 Program Submission!

To help you gear up for your proposal submission, be sure to check out this video made in collaboration with the Colorado State Library, Taking Your CALCON Session to the Next Level.

Help us ignite the magic at CALCON19 by submitting your presentation proposal! Deadline is March 1st, 2019 THERE WILL BE NO EXTENSIONS!!!

CALCON 2019

September 19-21, 2019

Loveland, CO

Categories
Lifelong Literacy

Grants Available for Colorado Teen Literature Conference in April

Grants are now available for teens and adults to attend the 31st Annual Colorado Teen Literature Conference on Saturday, April 13th, 2019, featuring keynote authors Sandhya Menon and Bill Konigsberg. This annual conference offers breakout sessions that have appeal for teens, educators, librarians, and anyone interested in teen literature.

The conference will be held at the Tivoli Conference Center (900 Auraria Parkway, Denver CO, 80204) on the Auraria Campus. Grant applications for the 2019 conference are open starting November 15th, 2018. The deadline for all grants is January 25th, 2019. All applicants will be notified of final decisions by email.

All grants include conference registrations ($75 for adults and $40 for students), breakfast snacks and lunch at the conference. Grants are awarded before general registration opens. If you do not receive a grant you may register for the conference starting February 4th.

Teen Grants: Each student may only apply for one grant; duplicate applications will result in removal from consideration. Students who have received grants in the past are also not eligible.

  1. Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS): Students in grades 6-12 and teens who are homeschooled are eligible to apply. Teens may self-nominate or be nominated by a teacher or librarian.
  2. REFORMA Colorado: Students in grades 6-12 and teens who are homeschooled are eligible to apply. Teens may self-nominate or be nominated by a teacher or librarian.
  3. UCD Teen Connection PanelTen teens will be selected to ask authors Sandhya Menon and Bill Konigsberg questions for the audience. You will sit at a table in front of an audience of around 300 people and speak into a microphone to ask your questions. To prepare, you will need to read books by both authors and prepare 5 thoughtful questions to ask both authors.
  4. Teen Grant by The Word: This grant is available to teens from underrepresented groups, including underrepresentation based on: race, cultural, ethnic, or religious identity; gender identity; sexual orientation; physical, cognitive or emotional disability; and socioeconomic adversity. Teens may self-nominate or be nominated by a teacher or librarian. Grant will include an RTD day pass to assist with transportation.

Adult Grants:  Each adult may only apply for one grant; duplicate applications will result in removal from consideration. Adults who have received grants in the past are also not eligible.

  1. Magwitch GrantThis grant is available to adults who advocate for teens, and who are interested in teen Literature and the authors who write for the teen audience. The grant is intended to assist an adult who might otherwise be unable to attend.
  2. Educator Grant by The Word: This grant is available to educators from underrepresented groups, including underrepresentation based on: race, cultural, ethnic, or religious identity; gender identity; sexual orientation; physical, cognitive or emotional disability; and socioeconomic adversity. The grant is intended to assist an educator who might otherwise not be able to attend. Grant will include an RTD day pass to assist with transportation.
  3. Colorado Language Arts Society (CLAS):  This grant is available to teachers and librarians who advocate for teens, and who are interested in teen Literature and the authors who write for the teen audience. The grant is intended to assist an adult who might otherwise not be able to attend.

Please visit their website for questions and more information at: https://www.coteenlit.org/

Categories
CSL News

Colorado State Library at CALCON18

CALCON, the annual conference of the Colorado Association of Libraries, is September 13-15, 2018 in Loveland. The event features keynote speakers, sessions, lightning talks, vendor exhibits, and after-hours activities. This year’s theme is “Ignite the Magic”. Visit CALCON18 to view full event details.

As in previous years, the Colorado State Library is pleased to support CALCON18 in multiple ways. We are sponsoring keynote speaker Dr. Isabel Hawkins, an astronomer at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, who will speak about broadening the participation of underserved groups in the sciences.

In addition, several CSL staff members will present sessions throughout the conference, ranging in topics from User Experience (UX) and photography to procrastination and collaboration. See the schedule below for details.

Finally, we are excited to showcase service animals at our exhibit hall booth. Hearing Dogs for the Deaf  and Veteran’s Puppy for Life will visit on Thursday, and Dogs for the Blind will be with us on Friday. We hope you will stop by to say hi and meet a friendly pooch.

Colorado State Library Sessions

See the full schedule.

Thursday, September 13

10:15am

Don’t Say Cheese: How to Take Great Photos | Dave Hodgins & Linda Hofschire

11:30am

Connecting Families in a Digital World | Christine Schein

Friday, September 14

9:00am

The Secret Life of Procrastinators | Jean Marie Heilig & Christine Kreger

1:15pm

Doing UX? What you can do to Improve User Experience | Babi Hammond, Tiffany Clendenin, Chris Evjy, Kati Polodna, Anthony White

The Magic Bullet for Increased Productivity | Linda Hofschire

3:15pm

Discover Colorado: Taking the Library Outdoors | Beth Crist

Learning IS the Work: Taking Charge of Your Learning | Christine Kreger & Sharon Morris

Collaboration: It CAN be learned | Becky Russell & Molly Gibney

Saturday, September 15

9:00am

The Hidden Biases of Good People | Beth Crist & Jean Marie Heilig

11:30am

The 2 Generation Approach to Eliminating Poverty | Beth Crist & Becki Loughlin

Categories
Continuing Education CSL News Resource Sharing

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs

Please Note – CSL Share & Learn in Glenwood Springs has been cancelled due to low enrollment.

For questions, please contact Amy Hitchner, Collaborative Programming Coordinator, at ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.

We hope to see you at a future professional learning event from the Colorado State Library.

 

Categories
CSL News

Many Flavors of Learning at ALA Midwinter 2018

Introduction

ALA Midwinter 2018 was held at the Colorado Convention Center from February 8-13, 2018. Midwinter is a time for lots of meetings—committee meetings, interest group meetings, updates, panels, etc.—but it also features traditional conference-style sessions, keynotes, and awards ceremonies.

Several members of the Colorado State Library’s Networking and Resource Sharing Team attended ALA Midwinter in various capacities. Here are their reflections on the sessions they attended, which spanned a wide range of library-related topics.

Mark’s Reflections

Mark Ferguson, Systems Administrator

Denver Public Library’s Plaza Program for immigrant, refugee, and asylee populations was featured during the Project Welcome: Refugee Resettlement Agencies & Libraries panel discussion at ALA Midwinter.

The Plaza program offers more than 48 hours of programming per week at 10 branches with a staff of about 30. All staff are bilingual, trilingual, or multilingual. DPL began the program about 10 years ago with a staff of two. “Anybody who walks in through the doors, we will welcome them, we will help them with whatever they need. If we can’t help them, we will connect them to the resource that can help them,” said panelist Nicanor Diaz, DPL’s Immigrant Services Manager.

Plaza programming highlights include English conversation tables, naturalization test assistance, immigration legal help, and arts and crafts tables. The conversation tables offer a safe environment for English learners and help participants build community.

“We get people from the same neighborhood who meet each other and are in the same place,” said Diaz. “You can see friendships and bonds that are made at the conversation tables.”

The arts and crafts tables are popular among children, but it’s not unusual to see grandparents and grandchildren working together on projects. “A grandmother might be speaking in her native language to give her child that sense that their culture is also important and to maintain that native language,” Diaz said.

To help immigrants, refugees, and asylees connect with reliable local information, DPL has developed their “Denver Resource Guide for New Americans,” available in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Somali, Arabic, and Amharic.

“We have those on display for people to grab and it is very comprehensive,” Diaz said of the guide, which is available in English at https://www.denverlibrary.org/sites/dplorg/files/2017/05/2017_English_Guide.pdf.

DPL is also focused on creating programming for immigrants, refugees, and asylees outside of the Plaza program, to ensure that they see the library as a welcoming place. “We want them to come into the library and feel that the space also belongs to them, because it does,” said Diaz. “Part of our work is to create programs that are targeted for immigrants and refugees outside of the Plaza program so that we can start building that sense of welcoming.”

Diaz credits the program’s growth to working with Jamie Torres, director of the City of Denver’s Office of Immigrant & Refugee Affairs, on helping DPL target branches with the largest immigrant, refugee, and asylee populations. Diaz said he looks forward to working with Torres, who was also a panelist, on finding ways to help doctors, lawyers, and other professionals new to America with professional credentialing needs. “We have a lot of people who are doctors that can’t practice because they’re not accredited within this country,” said Diaz. “They’re experts in that field and they should be working in that field. We want to help them reach that goal.”

Details about the Plaza program are available at https://www.denverlibrary.org/services-immigrants.

More information about IMLS-funded Project Welcome, which hosted the panel discussion, is available at https://publish.illinois.edu/projectwelcome.

Handouts available during the panel discussion included Project Welcome’s Welcome Guide at http://publish.illinois.edu/projectwelcome/files/2018/02/pw_guide_2.0-ALA.pdf and a tip sheet at http://publish.illinois.edu/projectwelcome/files/2018/02/tipsheet_Connect-Refugees-and-Public-Libraries-for-Life-Long-Learning.pdf.

Amy’s Reflections

Amy Hitchner, Collaborative Programming Coordinator

I attended several sessions on cataloging and metadata, ranging from high-level to highly technical. At the FRBR Interest Group, Kathy Glennan from the RDA Steering Committee gave an overview of changes coming to the RDA Toolkit in June 2018. The new toolkit will get some usability upgrades and will incorporate IFLA’s Library Reference Model (LRM) entities. Ms. Glennan was followed by Rocki Strader from the Ohio State University, who presented a model of user tasks (Want – Find – Get – Manage) which, while taken from the business world, are still applicable to library search.

Later I attended a series of presentations themed around the recently published Core Competencies for Cataloging and Metadata Professional Librarians. Utah State University presented an outline of their staff training model, which they created to develop cataloging expertise in paraprofessional staff. Other catalogers spoke about the need to communicate the importance of metadata to institutional leadership.

As a former cataloger, I was struck by how quickly the cataloging profession is evolving from the relatively small world of MARC and AACR2 to the wider world of linked data, metadata, and coding. These changes have major implications for cataloger education—including the need for training in computer science—in order to fully grasp the complex data models and metadata schemas already being used by larger institutions. Once library technology vendors fully incorporate the new RDA and BIBFRAME standards into their products, smaller institutions will have to address the training needs for staff members who have only ever worked within the MARC/AACR2 framework.

A separate yet complementary session I attended was A Collaborative Future for Libraries, Museums, and More: Chicago Collections and Lifelong Learning Across the Community, presented by Scott Walker from DePaul University. Chicago Collections began as a collaborative of 30+ Chicago-area libraries, museums, and archives, centered on a discovery tool called EXPLORE that provides access to member organizations’ collections through a single search interface.

While the tool was an achievement in and of itself, members quickly moved beyond the what of the tool to how the tool could promote more collaborative projects that directly serve and enrich their communities. This has resulted in shared exhibits, educational programs for K-12 students, speaker series, and shared professional development opportunities for members. One of their future goals is to work with Chicago leaders to include cultural heritage organizations in conversations about city-wide initiatives like tourism.

The Chicago Collections story is a reminder that technology itself should not be the goal of a project or partnership; rather, it should be the tool that helps make greater things possible.

Leigh’s Reflections

Leigh Jeremias, Digital Collections Coordinator

I participated in the RUSA Genealogy Institute’s pre-conference session. This all-day event featured presentations and discussions on family history and genealogy resources available to librarians. I participated in the morning’s newspaper digitization panel that included panelist Michael Church, Kansas Historical Society; Sarah Quimby, Minnesota Historical Society; and Thomas Ivie, Wyoming State Library.  Each of us shared information about our newspaper projects including our history, the extent of our collections, and funding models along with our sustainability models.

While every state’s funding model may be different we all share the same goal of making our historic community news widely available to our shared audience of students, teachers, genealogist and general researchers. It was a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the scope of newspaper content available.

Lori’s Reflections

Lori Smith, SWIFT Coordinator

The majority of my ALA schedule consisted of resource sharing and interlibrary loan sessions and meetings.

A Blockbuster Model in a Netflix World was a discussion on borrowing due dates, presented at the RUSA STARS ILL Discussion Group. The presenters shared information on their new approach to interlibrary loan periods, renewals, overdue fines, and invoices. They encouraged other attendees to consider extending their loan periods vs. renewing interlibrary loan items. They also urged ILL staff to remove other barriers to their procedures by eliminating unnecessary fines, invoices, and correspondence. By removing these additional tasks and lengthening the loan periods, the presenters believed an environment would be fostered where scholarly research would not be impeded by interlibrary loan practices.

Putting Open Access into ILL and the Open Access Button was the focus for the RUSA STARS Hot Topics Discussion Group. The presenters discussed how open access plays a role in their libraries, and how the Open Access Button is being integrated into library catalogs and interlibrary loan systems. More information may be found at https://openaccessbutton.org/.

At Seeding the Future: The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter, attendees learned about the Awesome Foundation and the Library Chapter (https://www.awesomefoundation.org/en/chapters/libraries). The Awesome Foundation is a global community supporting awesome projects with micro-grants. The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter was created to support the prototyping of library innovations that embody the principles of diversity, inclusivity, creativity, and risk-taking. Since its founding, the chapter has supported projects from around the world that reflect the potential of citizen and library driven collaborations to address community issues and innovations. Attendees received a brief overview of the recently funded projects that were inspirational and remarkable.

LITA Top Technology Trends was a well-attended session with five speakers sharing their ideas on emerging developments in technology. The topics ranged from drones to social entrepreneurship to artificial intelligence. A theme that several presenters discussed were the positives and the negatives in personalization of library services, software and platforms. The trend I found very interesting was the attention economy. The concept that a wealth of information can lead to a poverty of attention. The speaker introduced five areas to facilitate shifting from an information economy to an attention economy, which included immediacy, personalization, interpretation or context, accessibility of content, and findability. By embracing these concepts, libraries may serve their patrons better and in a more meaningful way.

Kieran’s Reflections

Kieran Hixon, Technology and Digital Initiatives Consultant

I attended ALA MidWinter as the President of the Association for Rural and Small Libraries (ARSL). ARSL is an affiliate member of ALA. My main purpose in attending ALA Midwinter was to meet with various groups, organizations, and project participants and to talk about how rural libraries could participate with them. I had 14 meetings.

My biggest takeaway was the need for more advocacy for rural libraries within the library community. The average library for a member of ARSL serves a community of 8,000, has a 6,000 square-foot building, has 2-3 staff members, and has a total budget of $200,000. Our organization has around 850 members. For most of us, ALA can be an overwhelming experience, and not scaled to fit our needs. Many of the initiatives and projects need to be adjusted to fit a rural library or they will fall out of the scope of what is practical and doable in a small and rural library.

A secondary takeaway was the need for a closer relationship with other ALA affiliates. I met with several ALA affiliate groups and saw similarities in our organizations. Working together we could tackle some initiatives together.

The most timely ideas I was introduced to were about mentoring and coaching. Following the presentation to CSL staff on coaching by Peter Bromberg, I met with a few of the ARL Diversity Scholars participating in a Leadership institute. Then I met with ARSL’s ALA Emerging Leader Phillip Carter, and spoke with a few ASCLA members about their upcoming mentorship program. With these ideas swirling around in my head, I sat with ARSL’s Vice President and outlined a plan for an ARSL Leadership Program.

Categories
Technology

Performant Art at An Event Apart

A List Apart is one of the pioneering sites for web design, having been at the forefront of many important web design movements, such as standards compliance, responsive design, and css-grid. In addition to the articles on their site, they also publish books and hold conferences about web design. This year they held a special Event Apart in Denver, which I was lucky enough to attend. The talks ranged widely in topics, from new CSS techniques, to Progressive Web Apps, to image optimization, animation methods, and usability research. But many of the talks returned in various ways to improving the performance of sites–making them smaller and faster and more user-friendly–and how sites could still express the individual artistry of the designer.

Wireframe of generic website by Dave Ellis of novolume.co.uk, published in the blog post “All Websites Look the Same,” in 2015.

There is not necessarily a tension between performance and art, but web design recently seems to be experiencing some growing pains as it becomes more central to larger organizations, produced by trained experts working in larger teams, more shaped by research, testing and analytics, and more homogeneous in its look and feel. Many of the Event Apart speakers were the young pioneers of the early, more individualistic and experimental, years of the web. Now the aged veterans of web design, and some of their younger acolytes, seem to yearn for the days before web design accrued so much bureaucracy.

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but lately all websites look the same. There is a large “hero” image–often an image carousel, which currently rivals Comic Sans as the bête noire of web designers–with your website’s name and nav menu at the top, a big headline and a “call to action” button. Beneath that some text and a row of icons with text that promote three or four features of the site or selling points of the company, and below that maybe a contact form or testimonials from clients.

 

There are some good reasons why this design pattern has become so widespread. Indeed, some designers have defended the ubiquity of this design, arguing that it reflects what users expect from sites these days, and that it is a natural consequence of the many shared tools designers use. But, for designers who would like their craft to be more of an avenue for artistic expression than a homogenous product, this kind of standardization is frustrating.

More than one presenter at the conference talked admiringly of the experimental early days of web design, when designers were improvising layout tools from table elements and images (see, for example, the old Space Jam site). Some even seemed to yearn for the days of Flash sites, which, whatever the problems with Flash as a technology, were seldom predictable. But unpredictability is seldom a boon to usability–and that is a tension web design will never resolve.

My favorite talk of the conference was by Jen Simmons, who hoped that the new CSS-grid layout tools will help the web be more artistic, but still clear, usable, and performant. A good deal of her presentation was about her research into the principles of print design, and how web designers can learn a lot from print about how to make creative designs that are still readable and clear. Similarly, Cassie McDaniel looked for inspiration in the work of some famous industrial designers, who obsessively designed and redesigned chairs. They produced many versions of these objects that served their utilitarian purpose well, but were still also vehicles for their designer’s individual artistic expression. It remains to be seen if web designers manage the same trick.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Reflections from the Library Marketing and Communications Conference 2017

On November 16 & 17, 2017, I attended the 3rd annual Library Marketing & Communications Conference, held in Addison, Texas. For two days, library marketers from diverse backgrounds came together to learn from experts and practitioners about the many facets of this topic, including media, public relations, partnerships, user-centered design, data-driven decision making, and the marketing cycle. View the full schedule of sessions.

As a librarian who came into communications and social media through the side door, it was comforting to know that half the conference attendees had a similar background to mine, which made it less intimidating to ask those questions that might seem second nature to a marketing professional. On the other hand, learning the tools of the trade from those same professionals was an enlightening experience, as was seeing what good library marketing could accomplish.

The themes I encountered throughout the conference were:

  • Marketing as a tool for shifting the public’s perception of libraries
  • The marketing lifecycle 101
  • Communicating in times of crisis
  • Social media tips and best practices
  • Using evaluation and data to build better marketing campaigns and create more user-centric libraries
  • Increasing patron engagement
  • Moving from traditional, events-based marketing to content marketing
  • Creating an effective marketing campaign with scant resources & expertise
  • Creating an effective marketing campaign with ample resources & expertise

I gravitated toward topics that related to my particular role at the Colorado State Library. Some of my favorite sessions were:

  • Libraries, Crises, and Social Media | Shel Holtz, Holtz Communication + Technology
  • Marketing the Modern Library: How to Launch an Effective Digital Campaign | Sherri Huleatt, Red Barn, and Lizz Roberts, Whatcom County Libraries
  • Launching a Distributed Marketing Initiative Amid Budget and Staffing Cuts | Tyler Cline, Molly Marcusse, and Leslie Waggener, American Heritage Center
  • Becoming a Stealth Power Broker in the Community | Paul Foster, Catawba County, NC
  • Speaking Finance: Creating a Value-Oriented Marketing Plan for your Library | Miranda Doran-Myers, Colorado State Library

Since this was a conference of communications specialists, you can bet that there were back-channel conversations happening concurrently over social media. Twitter conversations during the conference (search #LMCC17) ranged from the broad and theoretical to the immediately practical. Here are a few highlights:

I’m thankful that I was able to attend this unique conference—the only one of its kind in North America—in order to bring back new skills and information to support our Colorado library community. If you have any questions, please contact me at ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org, or you can tag the Colorado State Library on Twitter or Facebook.

Categories
Technology

Themes from the LITA Forum

The Library and Information Technology Association held their annual conference in Denver this year, and I was lucky enough to attend. After having taken a few days to collect my notes and thoughts, here are some of the major themes I saw at the conference.

The first thing that struck me was that many of the topics being presented on were very familiar. Libraries (especially academic libraries) are still grappling with iterative user-centered design, managing data, and how to demonstrate their value while still protecting patron privacy.

Newer, though, was an emphasis on management methods and how solutions to some perennial library problems require social as well as technical engineering. This was a major theme of the keynote by Casey Fiesler of the University of Colorado Boulder. Prof. Fiesler, who talked about how algorithm-driven news feeds and copyright filters on platforms such as YouTube can lead to a proliferation of fake news and frivolous take-downs of fair use content. Much of the response to these trends has been to pressure tech companies to improve their algorithms. But really, Fiesler argued, the solution can not be wholly technical–what’s really needed is better education so people can more easily defend themselves against misinformation. That’s not easy, of course, but libraries can obviously play an important role in the effort.

Project managers from Hesburgh Libraries, University of Notre Dame, presenting at LITA Forum, dressed as characters from Guardians of the Galaxy.

Libraries also seem to be realizing that their traditional organizational structures might not be best suited to managing technology projects. Several presentations focused on Agile management methods, and how they can help libraries better coordinate developers, librarians, and infrastructure. One the best presentations in this regard was by a group from Hesburgh Libraries at the University of Notre Dame, who came dressed as characters from Guardians of the Galaxy. They talked about their libraries’ move to a project-based organization, and the establishment of an Office of Project Management helped lead to a more efficient, better documented, and more sustainable suite of projects.

Thankfully the librarians from Notre Dame and others who talked about Agile methods took the Agile Principles as inspiration for a flexible set of practices, and avoided rigid adherence to the branded buzzwords of the full Agile playbook.  Libraries may be slower than IT departments and commercial developers in adapting Agile methods, but it seems like they are also being careful in selecting the portions of the method that best fit with their culture.

 

Categories
Continuing Education CSL News Resource Sharing

CSL Share & Learn: Greeley

In 2017-18, consultants from the State Library are traveling to several regions of the state for CSL Share & Learn, an event that combines professional development with time to share with colleagues. This free event is perfect for anyone working in libraries and cultural heritage organizations. The next CSL Share & Learn will be at Farr Regional Library in Greeley on December 8, 2017. We hope you’ll join us!

What can you expect at CSL Share & Learn?

We designed CSL Share & Learn to be an interactive, fun day that combines hands-on learning with time to “talk shop” in small and large groups. It also includes the opportunity to discuss library issues with State Librarian Gene Hainer.

Date & Time

December 8, 2017
9:00 am to 4:00 pm

The event begins before the library opens to the public. A Farr staff member will be on hand to let you in.

Location & Parking

Farr Regional Library
1939 61st Ave, Greeley, CO

Ample parking is available at the library.

Cost

CSL Share & Learn is FREE!

Registration

Registration is closed.

Food & Drink

Light snacks will be available, but you are responsible for your own meals and beverages, including coffee.

You are welcome to bring a brown bag lunch; there are also lunch options within walking distance and several more a short drive away on Centerplace Drive.

Schedule

  • 9:00-9:30, Game: How Well Do You Know CSL?
  • 9:30-11:00, Session 1: It’s not too late! Create a basic marketing plan for your summer learning program that you can implement right away. (Beth Crist and Amy Hitchner).
  • 11:00-11:15, Break
  • 11:15-11:45, Conversations with the State Librarian. Bring your questions about state or national topics, and share what’s going on in your area with Gene Hainer.
  • 11:45-1:15, Lunch on your own
  • 1:15-2:45, Session 2: Make your data work for you. Learn how to package and present data that represents your achievements and programs in ways that appeal to and resonate with your community. (Katie Fox and Miranda Doran-Myers)
  • 2:45-3:00, Break
  • 3:00-4:00, Small and Large Group Sharing Time; Wrap-up

Event Resources

Questions?

Please contact Amy Hitchner, Collaborative Programming Coordinator, at ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.


Future Locations

We are planning to bring CSL Share & Learn to other regions in Colorado. Keep an eye out for announcements about upcoming dates and locations.

Categories
Continuing Education CSL News Resource Sharing

Colorado State Library at CALCON17

The Colorado Association of Libraries Conference (CALCON) is an annual opportunity to meet, learn, and connect with library professionals from around our region. This year’s conference will be held at the Embassy Suites Conference Center in Loveland, October 12-14.

Staff from the Colorado State Library will be at CALCON17 to present sessions (see the schedule below), volunteer behind the scenes, and help out at the CSL booth in the exhibit hall. If you see one of us, please say hi!

Professional events like CALCON can be highly rewarding and energizing. In order to help you get the most out of your conference experience we have created this visual guide for planning, sharing, and reflecting on your learning.

[Click image for a downloadable pdf]


Schedule of CALCON Sessions by CSL Staff

See also: the full Schedule At-A-Glance

Thursday October 12, 2017

Resources, Resources Everywhere (Roundtable Discussion)

Amy Hitchner

Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 10:15 AM

What is a library resource? Books and DVDs are certainly resources, but so are meeting rooms, garden beds, telescopes, coding expertise, and much more. If you can share it with your community, then it’s a resource! Let’s talk about the kinds of resources that your library is sharing and those that it could be sharing. In the process you might find another library that wants to partner with you, or you might be inspired by some amazing new ways that other libraries are sharing. Let’s think big together about resource sharing!

Audience members will:

  • Identify examples of resource sharing within their own libraries that go beyond interlibrary loan
  • Be inspired by examples of resource sharing at other libraries
  • Identify some potential resource sharing projects or partnerships
  • Engage in conversations about resource sharing with their peers at other libraries

For the Love of Google

Christine Schein

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 12:45 PM

Join this fun and interactive session for tips and tricks you can’t afford to miss. We will explore a few Google Easter eggs to boot! From Google Gravity to Google form tips, you are guaranteed to learn something “Google new.” Let’s be collaborative in our learning together – participants will have a chance to share their favorite Google tips too.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will learn of the many Google (G Suite) tools that can be used for learning, productivity, and collaboration.

The Demographic Challenge and the Age of Discovery

Debbi MacLeod and Nicolle Steffen

Thursday October 12 at 12:45 PM

As Colorado continues to grow, it is experiencing a fundamental demographic shift. Join us to better understand this shift and how it will affect your library. Learn about “the age of discovery” where adults are finding new interests and rediscovering old ones. You will identify challenges using a holistic approach that will better prepare your library, brainstorm creative solutions with fellow attendees, and leave with strategies and ideas you can use.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the demographic shift happening in CO
  • Understand how older adults view themselves
  • Develop strategies for addressing this shift

Making the Most of Your Data: Creating Ripples in Your Community

Amanda Foust, Amanda Armstrong, Anne Kemmerling, Johanna Ulloa, and Tova Aragon

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 12:45 PM

Library staff across the nation are becoming data-savvy library leaders after attending the Research Institute of Public Libraries (RIPL) events and the online peer network and online community of practice that supports research and evaluation efforts. Join us for a panel discussion with RIPL alumni and members of our online community as we discuss how the RIPL experience has created positive change in their libraries. Participants will leave the session with a greater understanding of how to use data in their libraries and the different ways they can engage in the community of practice.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will leave the session with a greater understanding of how to use data in their libraries and the different ways they can engage in the community of practice.

Removing Barriers to Access: Eliminating Fines & Fees for a Win-Win for Your Library & Community

Beth Crist, Janine Reid, and Meg DePriest

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 12:45 PM

Librarians have debated both the philosophy and financial role of charging fines and fees for late, lost, and damaged materials for decades. The topic is still critical today as fines and fees pose a significant barrier to library use, especially for low-income families. Come to this interactive session to explore research on the benefits of eliminating fines and fees (including its low impact financial effect), learn from a public library director who eliminated overdue fines in her district and has tracked the positive effects for 2 years, and engage with colleagues on challenges and benefits to eliminating fines and fees.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Explore findings from professional literature about the perceived and real benefits and drawbacks to eliminating overdue fines and fees for lost and damaged materials.
  • Hear from a library director who very successfully eliminated overdue fines in her library district and has carefully tracked the effects for two years.
  • Engage in discussion with fellow participants on challenges and benefits to eliminating fines and fees.
  • Come away with research and strategies for making a compelling case for eliminating fines and fees at their libraries.

Plains to Peaks Collective: Increasing access to your unique heritage through the Digital Public Library of America

Leigh Jeremias

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 2 PM

The Colorado State Library has created a Colorado and Wyoming Service Hub of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The DPLA is an online portal that brings together collection information from libraries, archives and museums from around the United States and makes it freely available to the world. Join us to learn about the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC) technology, how you can participate in the initiative and what it can do for your institution by showcasing its unique digital collections.

The Power to Delight: Providing extraordinary service

Christine Kreger and Kieran Hixon

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 2 PM

People everywhere (including our patrons) have seemingly unending choices when it comes to deciding where to take their business. Consequently, customer experience can make or break the relationships we have with our communities. In this session we will share concrete tips from non-library service champions, and brainstorm ways to provide extraordinary service in our own organizations. Come prepared to share your own service stories, both good and bad, from within your library and beyond, as we work together to develop new rules of service designed to delight.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the importance of extraordinary services in libraries
  • Discuss what excellent customer service looks and feels like
  • Explore specific strategies for providing extraordinary service
  • Brainstorm ideas for empowering themselves, their staff, and their colleagues to delight our patrons

Getting to a Culture of Yes: Realizing the Possibilities of Yes

Rebecca Russell and Sharon Morris

Thursday October 12 at 2 PM

How can you shift your mindset to turn a negative interaction into a mutual win-win? Join us for this fun and highly interactive session. Share and learn techniques for shifting from no to yes, and plan for how to reinvigorate interactions among peers, administrators, patrons, policies and programs. Walk away with ideas to proactively add value and joy within your respective library communities.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees with share and learn techniques for shifting their respective library cultures using yes, and to position themselves to proactively add value within their library community.
  • Attendees will discover at least 3 ways to go from good enough to unexpectedly amazing.
  • Attendees will walk away with confidence that they can create more possibility, and less conflict, in their library interactions with peers, patrons, and administrators.

When You are Engulfed in Flames: Recognizing and overcoming job burnout

Jean Marie Heilig

Thursday October 12, 2017 at 3:15 PM

Job burnout is a response to stress that leaves you feeling hopeless, powerless, despondent and overwhelmed. But, don’t despair you can do something about it! During this session you’ll learn this doesn’t happen overnight. Our bodies and minds do give us warning signs, and if you know what to look for, you can recognize it before exhaustion and ineffectiveness set in. Discover if you are at risk or are experiencing job burnout and learn what you can do.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will discover if they are at risk for job burnout.
  • Attendees will have the ability to identify the warning signs of burnout.
  • Attendees will gain the skills needed to prevent and/or overcome job burnout.

Friday October 13, 2017

What does the rest of the world think of us?

Jacqueline Murphy, Claudine Perrault, Clark Becker, Connie Rule, and Katherine Correll

Friday October 13, 2017 at 9:45 AM

Ever wonder what decision makers think about libraries? Is our role as civic conveners more important than ever in our increasingly polarized political climate? Last Spring, in a partnership with the Aspen Institute, we assembled statewide non-library leaders ranging from Governors’ Office staff to rural school superintendents to identify strategic opportunities presented by the state’s public libraries in response to the educational, workforce, economic and technological transformation taking place across Colorado.

Come learn what we learned from those outside of libraries, about how libraries can be leveraged for healthier communities throughout Colorado.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand broader scope of libraries role as civic conveners.
  • Learn how to frame conversations with funders and decision makers.
  • Leave with tools from the Action Guide to make community engagement easier for staff and trustees.

Workplace Bullying: words can hurt more than you think

Jean Marie Heilig

Friday October 13, 2017 at 11:15 AM

Remember being bullied in grade school? The tears, fears, and anxiety of facing bullies may have shaped who you have become today. Do you ever wonder what happened to those bullies? It’s sad to say but many have grown up and are now creating havoc in our libraries! This engaging session will show you how to remain calm and stay strong when coping with the bullies you work with or serve in your community.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will acquire the skills needed to deal with difficult personalities.

High school diplomas at the library? A different approach to Adult Education Services

Viviana Casillas, Teona Shainidkrebs, and Gene Hainer

Friday October 13, 2017 at 2:15 PM

This session showcases an alternative resource in adult education: offering high school diplomas to adults through scholarships to the Career Online High School (COHS). Learn about COHS and how libraries across the country are offering this powerful resource. Hear how two public libraries made the decision to offer this service, and find out about budgeting, implementation, challenges, learning opportunities, evaluation, and success stories. Attendees will also learn how the State Library can support to libraries, regardless of size, in offering this resource to their community. Make a difference in customers’ lives, support their needs, and create long-term advocates. It can be done!

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand how to implement this program at their libraries to support their communities.
  • See how each library system can create a unique implementation plan, with the common goal of having students graduate from the program.
  • Get ideas about how to partner with other organizations offering GED/diploma programs as alternatives for those who don’t qualify for COHS.

When a patron needs more than a book: Transformation has no due date

Sharon Morris and Kieran Hixon

Friday October 13, 2017 at 3:45 PM

Have you accidentally helped a library patron transform? Are you ready to be an intentional champion for your library users? Join us as we explore services that make all the difference. Together we will share stories of extraordinary library moments and identify common ways library staff help people grow and learn in transformative ways. Walk away with an understanding of how libraries change lives and gain ideas for what you can do to provide more meaningful library services. Together we will discover how to shift libraries from places of transaction into spaces for interaction, and transformation.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • A clearer understanding of how “libraries transform”
  • At least three tips to facilitate deeper learning and growth with those in their libraries
  • A plan for specific strategies they can practice when they return to their libraries

Saturday October 14, 2017

Changing Lives: Creating Public Library Partnerships with Correctional Libraries

Erin Boyington and Teresa Allen

Saturday October 14, 2017 at 8:00 AM

The incarcerated in Colorado’s youth and adult correctional facilities are some of the most appreciative library patrons anywhere. 97{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} of them will be released someday, and many struggle with basic information needs. The key to helping the incarcerated successfully reenter society is library outreach. Join us to learn about forming partnerships with correctional libraries and to discuss how you can support your future patrons today.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Put business cards in the hands of public librarians and discuss ideas to create public library/correctional library partnerships to serve the incarcerated in Colorado.

Look at me when I’m talking to you! Getting ahead by improving your listening skills

Jean Marie Heilig

Saturday October 14 at 11 AM

In our high-tech and often stressful world communication is becoming more important than ever. If this is true then why are so many of us such poor listeners? Becoming a better listener will allow you to become more productive, avoid conflict, improve accuracy, and build better friendships and careers. During this session you will discover how good your listening skills are and what you can do to improve them.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Attendees will discover if their current listening skills are effective.
  • Attendees will improve their listening skills to become more productive and build better friendships and careers.

In Service of Hope: Empowering our patrons to achieve their goals

Christine Kreger

Saturday October 14, 2017 at 12:15 PM

“The capacity for hope is the most significant fact of life. It provides human beings with a sense of destination, and the energy to get started (Norman Cousins).” In today’s tumultuous environment, libraries are continuously developing services designed to meet the needs of the communities we serve. But what if libraries focused on directly impacting our communities by creating a culture of hope?

Join me for an interactive workshop exploring how we can align and/or create library services designed to empower our patrons to achieve their individual goals, to experience the power of hope, and to potentially transform our communities.

During this session attendees will:

  • Recognize hope as a basic human need
  • Explore the relationship of goal development and hope
  • Investigate the Essential Values Pyramid in relation to hope (https://hbr.org/2016/09/the-elements-of-value)
  • Brainstorm specific services and strategies to match all levels of the Essential Values Pyramid in order to provide hope and change lives.

Did They Learn? Getting Direct Evidence across Library Types

Katie Fox

Saturday October 14, 2017 at 12:15 PM

Across library types, we offer programming focused on learning–whether that is teaching early literacy skills at storytimes, exploring new software with adults, or helping students identify reliable resources. But how do we know if our participants actually learned? Often we ask them if they think they learned. But we can get better evidence of learning from evaluating what they can do or understand after the program. In this hands-on session, we’ll explore how to evaluate participant learning directly, through identifying and collecting the information you need, finding patterns, and using that information to share successes and refine future programming.

Presentation Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will be able to identify learning goals for programming and generate ideas for gathering direct evidence.

Bonus! CALCON Photo Contest

While you’re at CALCON17, enter the Colorado State Library’s photo contest for a chance to win a free registration to next year’s CALCON 2018.

To enter:

  1. Stop by the Colorado State Library’s booth to pick up a sticker for your conference water bottle.
  2. Take a selfie with your water bottle and sticker, PLUS State Librarian Gene Hainer somewhere in the photo.
  3. Upload your pic to Twitter with the hashtags #COCALCON17 and #WheresGene.
  4. The winner will be randomly selected from all entries.
Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Partnering with an Institutional Library

Colorado libraries reach their communities in many ways, including partnerships with local organizations and businesses. But has your library considered partnering with one of Colorado’s state-operated institutions? The residents of the state’s correctional facilities, mental health institutes, veterans’ community living centers, and youth services centers are often those who can most benefit from the services and resources your library offers. By creating partnerships with state-operated institutions in your area, you can have an impact on this special population in your community.

Melissa Blair-O’Shaughnessy, Recreational Therapy Director, and Bob (a resident) recently reorganized the library at Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center.

Ideas for Partnerships

Not sure where to begin when exploring a partnership with an institution? Below are a few ideas to get you started.

Introduce your library to institutional residents

Visit an institution to offer library card sign-ups and/or fine forgiveness to residents so they are more likely to use your services when they get out.

Materials checkout and delivery

This could be personal delivery, bookmobile service, or even a branch inside the institution!

Programs

Take book discussion groups, author visits, summer reading, and other programs you already do inside institutions, or tailor special programs to institutional residents’ needs. There is a strong need for programs on financial literacy, life skills, and technology use.

Family connections

Offer video visits at your library so your patrons can virtually visit with family members who live in institutions, or help us start our new family literacy project in the Department of Corrections.

Author Simone Elkeles presented at Platte Valley Youth Services on July 14, 2017, in partnership with Loveland Public Library.

Some things to keep in mind

Partnering with a state-operated institution poses some unique challenges that you might not have encountered before, especially regarding safety and security. Don’t let these concerns discourage you—the rewards from working with institutional populations will probably surprise you.

Getting started

Ask to speak directly with library staff or activities directors in institutions that you are interested in partnering with.

Security

Safety is the top concern in most state-operated institutions. You will likely need advance permission to enter the building and prior approval for materials you want to bring in.

Personal safety

You may need to take special care in an institution, but it’s not as scary as what you might see on TV or movies. Trained staff will keep you safe, and you may have an opportunity to attend training for volunteers.

The rewards

Those in institutions are often the most grateful patrons you can hope to meet. Volunteers who bring programs to institutions are regularly impressed by the intense interest and creativity shown by participants. You may find that serving them is your new passion!

Offenders in YOS Pueblo participated in the #LoveMyCOLibrary photo campaign by creating a flag-themed display with the reasons they love their library.

Connect with Institutional Library Development

Do you already have a partnership in place with an institution? Or maybe you have a partnership idea but don’t know where to begin? The Institutional Library Development (ILD) team at the Colorado State Library would love to hear about your ideas and successes—drop them a line at Institutional_Libraries@cde.state.co.us. You can also visit the Institutional Library Development page for more information about ILD’s programs and services.

Visit ILD at CALCON17

The ILD team will be running the Colorado State Library booth at the Colorado Association of Libraries Conference (CALCON17) in Loveland, October 12-14. Stop by and say hi!

Bonus! CALCON Photo Contest

While you’re at CALCON17, enter the Colorado State Library’s photo contest for a chance to win a free registration to next year’s CALCON 2018.

To enter:

  1. Stop by the Colorado State Library’s booth to pick up a sticker for your conference water bottle.
  2. Take a selfie with your water bottle and sticker, PLUS State Librarian Gene Hainer somewhere in the photo.
  3. Upload your pic to Twitter with the hashtags #COCALCON17 and #WheresGene.
  4. The winner will be randomly selected from all entries.
Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, September 1, 2017

Friday Grab Bag is a weekly Spotlight on Sharing series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Please note: There will not be a Friday Grab Bag next week; it will return on September 15.

Now let’s open this week’s Grab Bag!

Campus Life

Louisville Public Library’s Money Matters Series continues with Student Loan Strategies, September 13 from 6:30 to 7:30 pm. Student loan debt affects 45 million Americans, who hold over $1.3 trillion in student loan balances. This class will explore options for reducing student loan debt, including government repayment programs, scholarships, and consolidation.

Learn tips and strategies for navigating the college admissions process at Basalt Regional Library, September 11 at 6:30 pm. Peter Van Buskirk will lead the workshop.

The Learning Commons at Regis University is holding a Critical Reading Skills Workshop on September 12. Students will learn how to identify useful information from books and articles during the research process.

As part of their Maverick Research Workshops series, Colorado Mesa University’s Tomlinson Library is offering Trailhead to Knowledge, a learner-centered workshop on developing strong research questions. This program will be offered twice, September 5 & 6. See the library’s event calendar for details.

Auraria Library’s Knowledge Market is open for business! Students can stop in for help with research, writing, and tutoring. There are even some fun reads available when you need a break from studying.

Arthur Lakes Library at Colorado School of Mines is starting Mindfulness Mondays in partnership with Wellness at Mines and the Organization of Meditators at Mines. Starting September 11, students and faculty are invited to visit the library for guided meditation.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Fort Collins Book Festival (FoCo Book Fest) returns October 21, 2017 with the theme Writings and Riffs. Sonic Youth musician, New York Times bestselling author, and visual artist Kim Gordon will headline the free event, which is produced by Poudre River Public Library District in partnership with CSU Morgan Library. The author lineup will also include Steve Knopper, Craig Werner, G. Brown, and Khadijah Queen.

Social isolation, a growing problem in the U.S., can negatively affect your emotional and physical health. Discover strategies to create a stronger connection with your community during Intimacy vs. Isolation: Connecting in the Modern World at Broomfield Library, September 14 from 6:00 to 7:30 pm.

Learn about the Pioneer Women of Fremont County with Sherry Johns, September 6 at 5:30 pm at the John C. Fremont Library. Sherry will share tales and never-before-seen photos of these hardy settlers.

Ignacio Community Library is hosting an Open Art Studio on Tuesdays and Fridays in September from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm. This is a time that anyone can work on their art projects while enjoying the company of other artists.

September is Startup Month at Anythink Libraries, designed to support entrepreneurs and small business owners in Adams County. The month-long series will feature programs, networking opportunities, and partnerships, and will cover topics such as marketing, design thinking, hiring, and business plans. There are even programs geared towards kids and teens. Visit the Startup Month website for the full listing of events.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Scholarships & Grants

State Grants to Libraries funding is available for 2017-18! Eligible public, school, and academic libraries are encouraged to submit a short eligibility form by September 15. Funds can be used books, e-books, database subscriptions, and other educational resources.

Blogs

Arian the Book Club guru posted a fond farewell on Colorado Virtual Library. We wish her well on her future adventures!

New this week on the Colorado State Publications Library Blog: The Colorado State Fair | Preventing School Violence | Time Machine Tuesday: Teaching Colorado History | Colorado’s Labor History

Professional Development Opportunities

Colorado State Library consultants will be in Durango on September 21 & 22, 2017 for CSL Share & Learn, an event that combines professional learning with time for sharing. Registration is open through September 15 for this free event, open to all library and museum staff. We hope you will join us!

On the next CSL in Session: Is It Really Dead? How to rescue programs for hard-to-reach communities. Join this free webinar Sept. 28 at noon MDT. No registration required.

Join the quarterly RIPL webinar, Buy-In Not Opt-Out: Creating a Culture for Staff Driven Metrics. Sept. 28 at noon MDT.

Fun & Informative

Outside the Lines, a global initiative to demonstrate library innovation, is September 10-16, 2017. There’s still time to register on the OTL website. Please consider sharing your OTL activities with the State Library—we’d love to hear what your library has planned. On social media use the hashtag #getOTL.

Learn about the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC), the new Colorado-Wyoming Service Hub of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), during a free event on September 28, 2017 at the University of Wyoming.

Finally, a big THANK YOU to everyone who participated in our #LoveMyCOLibrary campaign, which ran in July & August 2017. We received dozens of photos celebrating the many ways that Coloradans love their libraries. Click the image below to see some of our favorite entries.
#LoveMyCOLibrary

This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitcher, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Continuing Education CSL News Resource Sharing

CSL Share & Learn: Durango

The Colorado State Library is coming to an area near you!

In 2017-18, consultants from the State Library will be traveling to several regions of the state for an event we’re calling CSL Share & Learn, which combines professional development with time to share with colleagues. This event is perfect for anyone working in libraries, museums, or archives. The first CSL Share & Learn will be at the Durango Public Library, September 21-22, 2017. We hope you’ll join us!

What can you expect at CSL Share & Learn?

CSL Share & Learn is an event for all library, museum, and archive staff, with multiple sessions that can be attended separately or in combination. The longer sessions include time for learning and sharing in a casual setting. The shorter sessions are opportunities to meet and discuss library issues with State Librarian Gene Hainer. The agenda below has more details about each session. Feel free to mix and match to suit your needs.

Cost, Registration, & Food

  • CSL Share & Learn is free!
  • Register using this online form by September 15. Please select all the sessions you plan to attend.
  • Light snacks will be available, but you are responsible for your own meals and beverages.

Durango: September 21-22, 2017

The first CSL Share & Learn event will be held at the Durango Public Library, 1900 E 3rd Ave. Many thanks to the Durango library staff for the use of their facility.

Register using this online form by September 15, 2017.

Session 1: Make Your Data Work for You

Thursday, September 21, 2017
9:00am – 12:00pm
Durango Public Library, Program Room 2

Agenda

  • 9:00 – 9:10, Welcome and Introductions
  • 9:10 – 9:30, Game: How well do you know CSL?
  • 9:30 – 10:30, Learning topic: Make your data work for you. Learn how to package and present data that represents your achievements and programs in ways that appeal to and resonate with your community.
  • 10:30 – 10:40, Short break
  • 10:40 – 11:45, Small group sharing time. This is a time to “talk shop” with your colleagues. Please bring a topic to discuss.
  • 11:45 – 12:00, Closing

Resources mentioned

Session 2: Conversations with the State Librarian

Thursday, September 21, 2017
12:00 – 12:30pm
Durango Public Library, Program Room 2

Agenda

  • 12:00 – 12:30, Conversations with the State Librarian. Bring your questions about state or national topics, and share what’s going on in your area with Gene Hainer.

Session 3: Marketing on a Dime

Thursday, September 21, 2017
1:00 – 4:00pm
Durango Public Library, Program Room 2

Agenda

  • 1:00 – 1:10, Welcome and Introductions
  • 1:10 – 1:30, Game: How well do you know CSL?
  • 1:30 – 2:30, Learning topic: Marketing on a Dime. Tips and resources for highlighting and promoting your organization’s valuable resources on a budget.
  • 2:30 – 2:40, Short break
  • 2:40 – 3:45, Small group sharing time. This is a time to “talk shop” with your colleagues. Please bring a topic to discuss.
  • 3:45 – 4:00, Closing

Resources Mentioned

Session 4: Conversations with the State Librarian

Thursday, September 21, 2017
4:00 – 4:30pm
Durango Public Library, Program Room 2

Agenda

  • 4:00 – 4:30, Conversations with the State Librarian. Bring your questions about state or national topics, and share what’s going on in your area with Gene Hainer.

Session 5: Introduction to the Plains to Peaks Collective

Friday, September 22, 2017
9:00 – 11:30am
Durango Public Library, Program Room 2

Agenda

  • 9:00 – 9:10, Welcome and Introductions
  • 9:10 – 10:00, Introduction to the Plains to Peaks Collective. Learn about the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC), a joint Colorado-Wyoming initiative to help libraries and museums share their unique collections with the world through the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).
  • 10:00 – 10:10, Short break
  • 10:10 – 11:00, PPC Participation 101
  • 11:00 – 11:30, Questions and Sharing

Resources Mentioned

Questions?

Please contact Amy Hitchner, Collaborative Programming Coordinator, at ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.


Future Locations

We are planning to bring CSL Share & Learn to other regions in Colorado. Keep an eye out for announcements about upcoming dates and locations.

Categories
Continuing Education CSL News

Libraries as Community Catalysts Virtual Conference

http://create.coloradovirtuallibrary.org/calendar/save-the-date-libraries-as-community-catalysts-virtual-conference/

Libraries as Community Catalysts Virtual Conference

August 16, 2017
9:00 am – 3:00 pm

The Colorado State Library  has partnered with the state libraries in Georgia, Iowa, and Maryland to offer the first-ever multi-state library virtual conference on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 from 9 am to 3 pm MDT on the topic of Community Building. We will explore how libraries are working in their communities to bring about positive change around a shared vision or goal.

We have an amazing lineup of sessions for the day, featuring great presenters!

The conference is free, open to all Colorado library staff, and you can join any time during the day.

Click here to register!

Visit the Library Learning & Creation Center for news about this and other learning opportunities.

Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

IFLA Global Vision

This guest post was written by Beth Crist, Youth & Family Services Consultant, Colorado State Library.

IFLA Global Vision

International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) – the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users – is undertaking a very ambitious project: to create one global vision for all of the world’s libraries. This exciting project closely matches one of IFLA’s key beliefs that only a united and connected library field will be able to fulfill one of the true potentials of libraries: to build literate, informed and participative societies.

IFLA’s Global Vision discussion is bringing together thousands from the worldwide library field to explore how a connected library field can meet the challenges of the future. Through two-day workshops in North America, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia Oceania, and Europe, library leaders representing dozens of countries and types of libraries discussed a vision for libraries, the challenges and opportunities that libraries face now and in the future, and how the field can unite to collaborate in an effort to strengthen the field globally. These discussions, wrapping up in July, are a springboard for further exchanges initiated by workshop attendees to occur through September 2017, the results of which will be provided to IFLA.

I attended the North American workshop, the first of these international workshops, in early May. Twenty-five librarians from Canada and the U.S. (Mexico was represented in the Latin American meeting) met at the Library of Congress for a lively, highly interactive workshop, full of small-group conversations and activities, large group exchanges, thought-provoking questions, and a stimulating idea exchange with a diverse set of colleagues. Most attendees represented a Canadian or American library association, on behalf of all types of libraries. The workshop was well structured to drill down to the core vision and values underlying the entire library field, all in an engaging manner that encouraged active participation by all.

The next step in the project will be an interactive online voting platform, launched in August, on the IFLA Global Vision discussion website to help prioritize actions. All of this input combined will provide the basis for a comprehensive IFLA Global Vision Report which will be published in early 2018. Based on the report, the library field will develop concrete work plans on how to put our collective vision of the future into practice.

Follow the discussion on the IFLA Global Vision website and on Twitter (#iflaGlobalVision), and make your voice heard during the online voting in August!

For more information, contact:
Beth Crist, Youth & Family Services Consultant
Colorado State Library
Crist_B@cde.state.co.us

Categories
CSL News

State Library Presentations at CLiC Spring Workshops 2017

Colorado State Library staff will be giving several presentations at the 2017 Colorado Library Consortium (CLiC) Spring Workshops, which will be held in Grand Junction on March 20 & 21, Fort Morgan on March 31, and Pueblo on April 24 & 25. Here is a handy list. We will update this post to include links to slides and supporting materials as presenters make them available.

See the CLiC website for more information and a complete program.

Grand Junction, March 20 & 21

Job Hunting Like a Boss: Tips From Both Sides of the Conference Table
Dave Hodgins and Miranda Doran-Myers

Futurecasting: No Crystal Ball Required!
Becky Russell and Beth Crist

The New Colorado Public Library Standards
Jacqueline Murphy and Kieran Hixon

Leveraging Basic Statistics for Your Library
Katie Fox

Wanna Partner Up? A guide to successful partnerships in your community
Miranda Doran-Myers

Confidence Counts
Christine Kreger and Georgia Birmingham (Arapahoe Library District)

Aspen Report: Learn about the Action Guide for Use in Your Community
Jacqueline Murphy

Look at me when I’m talking to you!
Jean Marie Heilig

Keep It Simple: Using Microsoft Office for Data Visualization
Katie Fox and Miranda Doran-Myers

Kitchen tested! Create your library’s Resource Sharing & Technology recipes
Amy Hitchner and Kieran Hixon

Value-Added! Digitizing your community’s historic newspapers
Leigh Jeremias, Janice Fox (Lake County Public Library) & Priscilla Walker (Palisade Historical Society)

Growing Readers Together: Early Literacy Services Beyond Your Library
Colorado State Library (Joyce Johnson and Pamela Mejia de Rodriguez)

A Balancing Act: Tips for a better work-life balance
Lori Smith

Workplace Bullying: words can hurt more than you think
Jean Marie Heilig

Weeding Your Website with Basic Google Analytics
Babi Hammond

  • Download PDFs of the presentation slides and text

Fort Morgan, March 31

Futurecasting: No Crystal Ball Required!
Becky Russell and Beth Crist

For the Love of Google!
Christine Schein

Colorado’s Demographic Challenge & the Age of Discovery
Debbi MacLeod and Nicolle Stephen

The New Colorado Public Library Standards
Lori Smith and Sandy Messick

Confidence Counts
Christine Kreger and Georgia Birmingham (Arapahoe Library District)

A Balancing Act: Tips for a better work-life balance
Lori Smith

Keep It Simple: Using Microsoft Office for Data Visualization
Katie Fox and Miranda Doran-Myers

Aspen Report: Learn about the Action Guide for Use in Your Community
Jacqueline Murphy

Growing Readers Together: Early Literacy Services Beyond Your Library
Colorado State Library (Joyce Johnson and Pamela Mejia de Rodriguez)

Leveraging Basic Statistics for Your Library
Katie Fox

Pueblo, April 24 & 25

Planning Library Services: Make the Most of Your Time
Erin Boyington

Look at me when I’m talking to you!
Jean Marie Heilig

What’s Going on in There?: How Brain Development Affects Engagement with Stories
Rosemary Breckenfelder (Pueblo Community College) & Diane Walden

Keep It Simple: Using Microsoft Office for Data Visualization
Katie Fox and Miranda Doran-Myers

Confidence Counts
Christine Kreger and Georgia Birmingham (Arapahoe Library District)

Futurecasting: No Crystal Ball Required!
Becky Russell and Beth Crist

Correctional Libraries: Seek and Find Answers to Your Patrons’ Questions
Renée Barnes

Wanna Partner Up? A guide to successful partnerships in your community
Miranda Doran-Myers

For the Love of Google!
Christine Schein

Cool Things Happening in CDOC Libraries
Erin Boyington

Leveraging Basic Statistics for Your Library
Katie Fox

Growing Readers Together: Early Literacy Services Beyond Your Library
Colorado State Library (Joyce Johnson and Pamela Mejia de Rodriguez)

Share it! Communication tips to improve your resource sharing potential
Amy Hitchner

Job Hunting Like a Boss: Tips From Both Sides of the Conference Table
Dave Hodgins and Miranda Doran-Myers

Library Services to Segregated Offenders
Diane Walden

Value-Added! Digitizing your community’s historic newspapers
Leigh Jeremias, Maria Tucker (Pueblo City – County Library District) & Jennifer Cronk (Aurora History Museum)

A Balancing Act: Tips for a better work-life balance
Lori Smith

Pick the Perfect Book!: Matching the Storytime Book to the Age of the Child
Kirsten Dees (Rawlings Library) & Diane Walden

Colorado’s Demographic Challenge & the Age of Discovery
Debbi MacLeod & Nicolle Steffen

Workplace Bullying: words can hurt more than you think
Jean Marie Heilig

Correctional Libraries Lightning Round
Renée Barnes

Reading to Engage Your Young Audience
Kirsten Dees (Rawlings Library) & Diane Walden

The New Colorado Public Library Standards
Jacqueline Murphy

Augmented Reality – Creating Active Learning
Christine Schein

Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

2017 Youth Services-Related Conferences in Colorado

As the new year begins, it’s a great time to take a look at the many excellent professional development opportunities in Colorado. We are so fortunate to have such a wealth of opportunities in this state for youth services library staff. Not all of the events have dates yet but those will be announced over the next few months. If you know of another opportunity of interest, please share it by contacting Beth Crist, Youth & Family Services Consultant, at Crist_B@cde.state.co.us.

CATS (Children and Teen Services Division of the Colorado Association of Libraries) Winter Workshop

  • Monday, January 30, Library 21c, Colorado Springs
  • An excellent line-up of sessions and networking opportunities focused on a diverse array of children and teen services topics, and registration is open! Also, save the date for the CATS Spring Meeting on April 14 in Durango (it’s free!).
  • Learn More: https://catsig.wordpress.com/

CCIRA (Colorado Council International Reading Association) 2017 Conference on Literacy

  • February 1-4, Denver Tech Center
  • This conference focuses on literacy-related topics primarily for educators of K-12 students; topics include reading, writing, digital literacy, STEM, student engagement, and more. Registration is open!
  • Learn more: http://www.ccira.org/ccira-conference.html

2017 Rocky Mountain Early Childhood Conference

  • March 17-18, Denver
  • This conference is designed to meet the professional development needs of early childhood practitioners while at the same time providing a forum for community advocates to learn, share, and network. Registration is open!
  • Learn more: http://www.ecconference.com/

CLiC (Colorado Library Consortium) Spring Workshops

  • March 20-21: Grand Junction; March 31: Fort Morgan; April 24-25: Pueblo
  • These workshops, intended for all types of library staff, include many youth services related topics as well as sessions on customer service, leadership, intellectual freedom, and more. Registration is open!
  • Learn more: http://www.clicweb.org/training-and-education/clic-workshops/springworkshops

Colorado Teen Literature Conference

  • April 1, Denver
  • The mission of the Colorado Teen Literature Conference is to promote and celebrate teen literature focusing on significant authors, their writing, and methods for incorporating this literature in teaching and in library outreach programs. Both teens and adults are welcome! Registration opens February 6; mark your calendar as this one fills up fast!
  • Learn more: http://coteenlitconf.wixsite.com/ctlc

REFORMA Colorado 2017 Mini-Conference

  • May 2017, Denver
  • This mini-conference is always an exciting time to learn about library services to Latinos and Spanish-speaking communities and to network with like-minded library staff. And right now there’s a call for session proposals.

2017 LENA Early Language Conference

  • September 12-14, Vail
  • Solving the early language crisis means reaching all the adults who impact a child’s life: parents, caregivers, and educators. To connect these touchpoints, we are convening experts in social change, education, healthcare, funding, and research at a multi-disciplinary colloquy in Vail, Colorado. Conference attendance is by invitation only; to request an invitation, please submit your request via the LENA Conference 2017 RSVP Form.

2017 CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference

  • September, Denver Metro area
  • This conference—the only one of its kind in the country—focuses on library services to support young children and their families. Watch for details about this exciting, unique opportunity to learn and network with others passionate about early literacy.
  • Learn more: http://www.clel.org/

CALCON 2017 (Colorado Association of Libraries)

  • October 12-14, Loveland
  • CALCON is Colorado’s largest event for staff from libraries of all types and sizes throughout the state. It’s a great opportunity to learn and explore, meet new people, meet with vendors, network, and have fun! And there are always plenty of youth services related topics. The conference has a call out for session proposals.
Categories
Resource Sharing

Spotlight on Sharing: Lessons from the Library Marketing and Communications Conference 2016

LMCC 2016I recently returned from the second annual Library Marketing and Communications Conference (LMCC), which was held in Addison, Texas on November 16 & 17, 2016. The event, put on by Amigos Library Services, brought together library communications professionals of all different backgrounds and levels of expertise, from trained communications specialists to librarians who “accidentally” wound up in the role.

The participants I spoke with agreed that they were clamoring to spend time with other library communications professionals, especially since this is the only conference of its kind. Registration was at capacity, with over 300 attendees coming from all over the U.S. and Canada.

Programs covered a range of communications topics: social media, environmental signs, tools and tips, collaboration opportunities, graphic design, branding, strategy, and more (see the full program). There was something for every type of library communications professional, from the beginner to the highly experienced. View the backchannel conversations on Twitter with the hashtag #LMCC16.

My goal in attending LMCC was to bring back pertinent information for libraries of all sizes, but especially for smaller libraries that don’t often have dedicated marketing and communications staff. Here is what I found the most useful; I hope you will find useful as well.

Start with a Communications Mindset

Every project, no matter how large or small, should include the question, “How will we communicate this?” Including marketing and communications from the beginning can result in a better product in the end since it forces us to consider the project from different angles. The opposite of this holistic approach is the “Can you make me a flyer” syndrome, where marketing is an afterthought to the real planning process.

Pick the Tools that Match Your Users

A diverse communications strategy will help you reach a wider audience, but that doesn’t mean you need to take on every new technology that comes along. Use feedback from your users to find the best ways to reach them, then choose the media channels that make sense. Your community might prefer email newsletters, blogs, and Facebook, while another community might prefer to learn about library events in the local newspaper. Just as with planning your programs and services, you should base your communications strategy on the needs of your community.

Inspire Others to Share Your Story

The most powerful way to use social media is to inspire your followers to be your advocates. When a follower shares your post, they are incorporating your library’s message into their personal online “brand”, so give them content that they want to share with their friends. Here are some best practices for making your content shareable:

  • Be a human first. Your followers want to connect with people, not buildings, policies, or faceless entities.
  • Post questions that are fun to answer or that start conversations, such as “What’s a book you would love to see made into a movie?” or “Should we paint the wall in the Children’s Area blue or green?” Provide easy ways for your followers to engage with you.
  • Social media engagement is much higher for posts that use images, so include them whenever possible. (Canva is just one of many online tools that lets you design high quality images for free.)
  • Before posting, ask yourself, “Would I share this with my friends?”

Maximize Your Time

Communications is probably one of many hats that you wear at the library, so make the most of your time by using a tool that helps you plan and track your social media content. One presenter shared Ashley Chasse’s The Super Awesome Social Media Content Calendar, though you can use whatever works for you. Also, consider using a management tool like TweetDeck or HootSuite to manage multiple social media accounts. The important thing is to treat your communications like any other task to be planned and tracked.

Branding isn’t a Bad Word

Branding is the process of creating a consistent, well-designed experience for your patrons. It doesn’t have to make your library feel sterile or corporate—good branding means that you craft every point of contact with your patrons in mind. This could mean (but isn’t limited to) designing a new logo, rethinking your internal and external signage, applying User Experience (UX) principles to your website, or offering customer service training to your staff. Wherever and whenever patrons come into contact with your library, they should know that it is your library because of the consistent look and feel.

Relationships Still Rule

The best communications medium is still…air. Keynote speaker and author John Haydon reminded us of this, and told us that the conversations we have with our patrons are the best marketing tools of all. This is great news for small libraries with strong community connections. After all, who better to spread your library’s message than your friends and neighbors?


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Reflecting on and sharing out what you learn at conferences helps our entire profession grow. What have you learned recently at a conference? Share it by emailing Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. If you’re on Twitter, tweet @hitchlib or use the hashtag #spotlightonsharing.

Categories
CSL News Lifelong Literacy

Registration Open for SPELL Symposium

We are pleased to announce that the SPELL (Supporting Parents in Early Literacy through Libraries) Symposium is now open for registration.

This interactive event is the culmination of the Colorado State Library’s three-year SPELL project, funded by IMLS, in which project staff and partners sought to find and field test promising practices to support low-income parents of children birth through three with easy ways to incorporate early literacy activities into their daily lives, to remove barriers to library use, to form strong partnerships with state and local organizations, and more.

Event details:

  • When: Thursday, September 8, 9:00 to 4:30
  • Where: Holiday Inn Lakewood, 7390 W. Hampden Ave, Lakewood, Colorado
  • Who: Library staff and administrators, early childhood educators and administrators, library and ECE students, staff at nonprofits and foundations, and stakeholders who are interested in supporting parents with young children through early literacy messaging and activities; in learning about strong literacy-related partnerships between public libraries and a wide range of organizations; in meeting and networking with like-minded individuals; and in creating a plan to better support low-income parents with young children.
  • Cost: Free!
  • Attendance capacity: Attendance is limited. Registration will be available on a first-come, first-served basis; we will maintain a waiting list should it fill up.
  • Link to Register

There are a limited number of travel stipends available for both Colorado and out of state participants; that application is available on our website.

The SPELL Symposium will include:

  • A lunchtime keynote address by Paul Raeburn, author of Do Fathers Matter? What Science is Telling Us about the Parent We’ve Overlooked
  • An overview of and results from the three-year SPELL project, including original research and field testing in eight public libraries in Colorado
  • A discussion of common challenges parents face in incorporating early literacy and other learning activities into their daily lives, as well as their barriers to library use–and evidence-based methods to make it easier for them to do both
  • A look at each of the eight SPELL prototypes in Colorado, with time to talk with staff at those libraries and their partners
  • Important lessons learned throughout SPELL, and how you can incorporate those lessons into your organization’s plans to support low-income parents with young children
  • Time to reflect, discuss, network, and plan
  • A handy SPELL bag filled with professional development books, handouts, and more!
  • …and lunch! Lunch will be provided for free.

You might also consider attending the excellent CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference the following day, also in Lakewood. Registration for that event is now open, and SPELL Symposium travel stipend recipients are eligible to receive free registration to the CLEL Conference.

Many thanks to IMLS and CLiC for their important financial support of the SPELL Symposium. We hope to see you there!

For more information, contact:

Beth Crist
Youth & Family Services Consultant
Colorado State Library
Crist_B@cde.state.co.us

Categories
CSL News

Patent and Trademark Training at Denver Public Library

The Patent and Trademark Resource Center at the Denver Public Library is hosting a free training session for librarians by representatives of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. We will cover “Answering Commonly Asked Patent Questions” and “Answering Commonly Asked Trademark Questions.”

The training will be held from 9am to 12pm on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at the Central Library Large Computer Training Room on the fourth floor. There should be enough computers for everyone.

All attendees should enter the library at the Broadway entrance and tell security that you are here for the presentation.

For more information, you can email dplpatent@denverlibrary.org or call the Patent and Trademark Resource Center in Reference Services at 720-865-1363.

Denver Public Library
Central Library
10 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy
Denver, CO 80204
www.denverlibrary.org/patents