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Colorado State Publications Blog

Baseball in Colorado

A new exhibit at the History Colorado museum, Play Ball!, brings in some amazing artifacts to tell the story of the nation’s pastime. In conjunction with the exhibit, the two most recent issues of History Colorado’s Colorado Heritage magazine include numerous articles on the history of Colorado baseball.
http://www.cde.state.co.us/Scripts/SPDirect.asp?SPF=http://www.cde.state.co.us/artemis/hedserials/hed615internet/hed6152018summerinternet.pdfThe Spring 2018 issue looks at how major league baseball came to Denver, as well as a story of how a softball league helped one rural town through the struggles of the Great Depression.  The brand-new Summer 2018 issue includes a fun article with historic photographs and stories of early Colorado amateur baseball teams. Another article explores how the museum collected baseball-related artifacts. There’s also an article about girls’ baseball teams.
If you’re interested in the history of baseball in our state, be sure to also see They Came to Play: A Photographic History of Colorado Baseball, available for checkout from our library or on Prospector.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Golf in Colorado

As the weather gets warmer people are beginning to head to the golf course.  If you’re interested in the history of golf in Colorado, or are a landscaper, manager, or owner of a golf course, our library has several resources that may be of interest to you.

The Economics of Colorado’s Golf Industry, The Golf Industry in Colorado, and Resource and Economic Aspects of Golf in Colorado, all publications from Colorado State University’s Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, discuss golf’s contribution to the state’s economy, factoring in tourism, environmental impacts, drought, and more.

Greening Your Golf Course is a publication from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment that teaches golf course managers how to keep their golf courses green without polluting the air and water.

If you’re looking for information on the history of golf in Colorado, a 1992 publication from the University of Colorado’s Business Research Division gives a snapshot of Colorado golf a quarter-century ago.  Colorado Golf Highlights:  A Review of Available Data, 1989-91 is available for checkout from our library.  You can also check out issues of Colorado Heritage magazine, which contain several interesting articles on the golf industry in our state.  See “Lost Links:  In Search of Estes Park’s Oldest Golf Course,” January/February 2010, and “The Sage and Cactus Golf Club:  Hugo, Colorado, 1939-42,” Summer 2007.  Finally, see James Whiteside’s Colorado:  A Sports History (University Press of Colorado, 1999), also available for checkout from our library. 

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado Ski History

Skiing has been an important part of Colorado’s history, from the Tenth Mountain Division “Soldiers on Skis” in WWII to the development of the state’s largest tourist draw.  The current (March/April 2016) issue of Colorado Heritage includes a detailed article about skiing in Hot Sulphur Springs in the early twentieth century.  The article features some excellent photographs.  In our library we have numerous other publications that tell the story of skiing in Colorado.  Some highlights include statistics and profiles of ski areas from the 1960s, ’70s, and 80s, and economic studies of the ski industry.  Search the keyword “skiing” in our library’s web catalog to get a list of resources.  You can also find out more about ski tourism today by visiting the state’s official tourism website, www.colorado.com.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Kids' Games, 1931

You probably know how to play charades, or bean-bag toss, or how to make shadow animals.  You might even remember Cootie (I do!)  But do you know how to play Up Jenkins?  Or, You Have a Face?  Or, I Went to Paris?  What in the world is Dumb Crambo?  Do you know the elements of Four Elements?  If you were a child in 1931, you might know.  One of the little gems in our collection is a 1931 handbook from the Colorado Cooperative Extension, which explains games children could play using everyday objects — very handy for parents during the Great Depression who couldn’t always afford to buy toys for their children.  Games used food items (e.g. Egg Shell Polo, Rice Relay), household items (e.g., Clothespin Race or games using pictures from magazines and catalogs), or natural materials (games using snowballs or flowers).  Other games used no physical items but were instead games of memory, thinking, or music.  Take a look to find some games your own children or grandchildren could learn to play — a fun and interactive way of teaching history.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Bicycling in Colorado

The weather is warming up, so many people are getting back on their bikes after a long, snowy winter.  The Colorado Department of Transportation offers several helpful bicycle maps for planning your routes.  They have developed an interactive Bicycle & Byways Map app that uses geolocation to find bike routes near where you are located.  If you prefer an old-fashioned paper map, we have the  Bicycle Colorado set of regional maps available for checkout from our library.  We also have a 2004 Colorado Bicycling Map that is also available for checkout.  Other resources include the Colorado Bicycling Manual and a video, Share the Road.  Find more resources from our library by searching our web catalog.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

CSU Football Stadium Study

An article in today’s Denver Post references a feasibility study done last month and presented to Colorado State University regarding the possibility of building a new football stadium.  You won’t find it in the newspaper article, but you can find the feasibility report in our library collection:  Colorado State University On-Campus Stadium Feasibility Study, dated August 9, 2012. 

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado and the Olympics

Recently, Colorado made headlines with announcements from the Governor and the Mayor of Denver that an exploratory committee would look into the possibility of Colorado bidding for the 2022 Olympic Games.  Just last week, however, the United States Olympic Committee announced that the US would not be seeking the 2022 Games.  Colorado has had an interesting role in Olympic history.  Many athletes train in Colorado, both on the slopes and in the Olympic training facility in Colorado Springs.

In 1970, when Colorado received word that it had been awarded the winter Olympics for 1976, the state was poised to make Olympic history – but not for reasons of hosting the games.  Colorado:  A History of the Centennial State (2005, University Press of Colorado), available from our library, tells the story of Colorado and the Olympics.  When first awarded the Games, Coloradans were thrilled, but as time progressed, the already development-concious state began to see the downsides of hosting the Olympics -lots of construction, lots of people, and lots of money.  The book relates how, by the time the figure of $100 million started to be talked about, many Coloradans seriously started to oppose hosting the Games.  Then, in 1973, Governor John Love resigned, “admitt[ing] that in negotiating for the games the boosters had ‘lied a bit.'”

One of the fiercest opponents of the Olympics was Richard Lamm, then serving as a Democratic state Representative from Denver.  He is largely given credit for swaying voters in the 1972 election to reject funding for the Olympics.  Two years later, he rode the wave of popularity to the Governorship.  Not only was the 1972 vote — which has the distinction of being the only time in history that a location awarded the Games has voted to reject it — an important part of Olympic history but, asserts Colorado, it was also responsible for ushering in a political “sea change” with the election of Lamm, Patricia Schroeder in Congress, and Gary Hart and Tim Wirth in the Senate, all ousting old-guard politicians who had held office for years.

For the complete story, check out Colorado:  A History of the Centennial State, which, unlike so many other local history books, covers not only the “early days” but events all the way up to the new millennium.  You can also search our library’s web catalog for more on the Lamm administration, a biography of Governor Love, and much more on the political climate of the 1970s.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado Sports

Sports and recreation are a huge part of life for many Coloradans. One of the books in our collection, Colorado: A Sports History, shows that it has been this way for a very long time. This book gives the history of all kinds of sports and recreational activities in our state. Other publications you can find in our collection go into detail on specific sports, such as They Came to Play: A Photographic History of Colorado Baseball. Additionally, you can find a large number of Department of Natural Resources publications on outdoor sports such as hunting, fishing, biking, and boating. And of course we can’t forget skiing, perhaps Colorado’s most famous recreational activity. There are a number of publications in our library that deal with skiing, including several ski tourism studies. You can even find in our collection a book on sports nutrition, Food for Sports. So whether you’re interested in summer sports or winter sports, our library can help you find out more about sporting in our state.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado Baseball

The Colorado Rockies just finished competing in the World Series. Even though they didn’t win, it marks a new chapter in the history of sports in Colorado. You can find out more about Colorado’s sporting past in the book Colorado: A Sports History by James Whiteside, and particularly Colorado’s baseball past in They Came to Play: A Photographic History of Colorado Baseball by Duane Smith and Mark Foster. Both of these are published by University Press of Colorado and both available from our library.

Maybe now after such a significant baseball event, they’ll need to publish a new edition of They Came to Play!