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Read to the Children

Arrowhead CC: Mouse Mess

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Lifelong Literacy

LiteracyGo the New Tablet from AWE Learning

During our summer kits preparation time, Deborah from John C Fremont Library shared with us an innovative way to take pop-out story times out of the libraries.
We already know that while kids are all excited and thrilled about summer time, librarians and informal child care providers are pulling their hair off to come up with new, fun and engaging ideas for summer activities.
Outreach, summer reading, lesson planning, and programming, can take a whole lot of your time as a librarian, having that in mind, AWE learning has come up with a little help for you.
LiteracyGO tablet is the newest early literacy solution from AWE learning.

“Is an early literacy tablet that focuses on educational content and is engaging, durable, easy to use, and safe.”

Through home visitation and pop-out storytimes in the community, Deb, plans to take out storytimes and their literacy center. The LiteracyGo offers, fun and interactive classic story titles for all ages, the text is highlighted, words are pronounced, and content is enhanced with fun hidden features.

It’s a bright solution to reach those who have limited access to the library!
Some of the features of the Learning Stations are:

  •  Created specifically for young learners!
  • Award-winning content: Providing hours of education and fun!
  • 70+ Software titles: Over 4,000 learning activities
  • – English, Bilingual Spanish, & Bilingual French Content List 
  • Correlated content: Aligned to STEM/STREAM and correlated to academic standards
  • Safe environment: Self-contained learning solution keeps children away from unwarranted websites and content
  • Engaging and fun! Full of child-friendly images, sounds, songs & videos
  • Utilization statistics: AWE Learning’s unique Customer Portal allows you to easily view utilization statistics for any given time period
  • Easy to use! As a plug-and-play solution, the product is ready for use out of the box!
  • Ideal for all learning styles: Auditory, visual, tactile & kinesthetic learners.

Categories
Lifelong Literacy

Benefits of Reading with Children

If you are related to the fields of early literacy, libraries, education, child development, brain development, etc., you already know that reading to our kids helps to develop their brains and has a lasting impact in their learnings.

Maybe you have read about it or studied it, but maybe you have also experienced it with the kid you care about, with your own child or with your students. You really know the benefits of reading with your child, but sometimes you don’t know how to explain it to your friends, families or neighbors that you help, or to your patrons or your student’s parents.

It is always good to have new research as a backup, an ace up your sleeve!

So, here we give you a good one:

“New research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school.”

This new research was presented last Monday, May 8, at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco.

If you want to learn more about this, click here.

 

Categories
Lifelong Literacy

To Grow a Reader is Not Out of This World!

During my years as a preschool teacher, I had the opportunity to work in a bilingual school back in my native country, the Dominican Republic. The student population was mostly foreigners: Italian, French, Canadian, Spanish, Mexican, Venezuelan, Colombian, Swedish, Puerto Rican, American, Dominican, etc.

At the beginning of the school year, during teacher-to-teacher meetings, we discussed the list of students, their behavior, academic skills, strengths, weaknesses, and families. This type of meeting is normal at the beginning of every school year.

On the list was a little girl’s name. I asked about her and the teacher’s response was:

“She is new in school and in the education system, has never attended a school or had formal education, so get ready, it’s not going to be easy!”

I confess that my mind began to create the worst of the scenarios.

The first day of school came, and the little girl was very confident meeting her new classmates. Throughout the school year, she excelled in all areas—cognitive, social, motor skills, all!  She was above average; it was impressive.

During one of my conversations with her mother, I asked her: How does she know so much? What are you doing with her? Tell me the secret!  The mother replied:

“Nothing out of this world!”

We talked all the time, even before she learned to speak. We talked about colors, shapes, letters and numbers. Whatever was in her environment.

We read books since the day she was born.

We play together, laugh and have fun. We go to the park and she plays with her friends.

We sing songs from her favorite shows or CDs—songs that my mother sang to me.

We draw together. When I write the grocery list and my to-do list, she helps me. I share my day with her and we always try to have a good time.

That school year, I learned that with a language-rich environment, conversations, and interactions with family,  friends, and neighbors (FFN) a child can have an optimal language development. That by playing, singing, creating and having fun, a child can have meaningful learnings that lead to school success.

I learned that it doesn’t take an effort out of this world. By involving our kids in simple things that we do in our everyday routine, a kid can excel.

Tips to Grow a Reader with Success:

Talk through the day: Share your experiences and thoughts with your child, let him respond and have a back and forth conversation.

Read with your child once a day: Read to them, even if you don’t have a book. Read the signs on the street, newspaper, magazines, flyers, pizza boxes, name brands, etc.

You can also create a book, write a story, make drawings together and then read it together. There are lots of letters and words around to read.

The key of playing is to have fun! You can turn an everyday routine into a game just by having fun, singing, dancing, playing “I spy” games while eating, and counting cups while cleaning. Play with your child: we are never too old to play and have fun.

Sing: Don’t be ashamed if you don’t have the best of voices. You are not in a contest and the worst that can happen is that you both start laughing at each other, and guess what? You are going to be having fun! Be confident and sing your heart out with your child; they are going to learn to be confident and not afraid. Just by singing and having fun together, you can help your child with self-esteem.

Scribble, draw and write: Encourage your child to scribble, draw or write, depending on their skills. Have pencil, pen, crayons, chalk and finger paint around them. When your child scribbles or draws, ask questions about the work and then write it as a little note on the side. By doing this you will help your kid relate written words with spoken words.

If your child is in a pre-writing stage, have modeling clay for them. Even better—cook together! Let your child help you mix and stir. If you are cooking a dough, like a cookie dough, pie crust or pizza dough, give your child a little piece of dough and let them roll, pinch, smash and have fun with it.

Categories
Read to the Children

Rifle CC Audio Recordings of Giraffes Can’t Dance

 The five audio recordings below were made by offenders in Rifle Correctional Center. Each reads this year’s One Book 4 Colorado selection, Giraffes Can’t Dance, by Giles Andreae, and illustrated by Guy Parker-Rees.

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Read to the Children

Denver Women’s: Giraffes Can’t Dance (1)

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Read to the Children

Denver Women’s: Giraffes Can’t Dance (2)

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Read to the Children

Four Mile: Giraffes Can’t Dance (1)

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Read to the Children

Four Mile CC: Giraffes Can’t Dance (2)

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Read to the Children

Arrowhead CC: Giraffes Can’t Dance

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Read to the Children

4 Mile CC: Baby Einstein & Spongebob for President!

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Read to the Children

4 Mile CC: Slide & Find Christmas

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Read to the Children

4 Mile CC: Phineas and Ferb–Not a Creature Was Stirring…

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Read to the Children

Fremont Correctional Center: One Sweet Race

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Read to the Children

Buena Vista Correctional Facility: Grumpy Bird

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Read to the Children

Denver Women’s Correctional Facility: Daisy Dinosaur Gets Lost

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Read to the Children

La Vista Correctional Facility: Buenas noches, Luna

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Read to the Children

Fremont Correctional Facility: Trucks

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Read to the Children

Four Mile Correctional Center: Tinker Bell & Secret of the Wings

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Read to the Children

Fremont Correctional Center: Follow that Sound!

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Read to the Children

Four Mile Correctional Center: Pooh’s Honey Adventure