Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Another State Pubs Post

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

New State Pubs Post

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

The standard chunk of Lorem Ipsum used since the 1500s is reproduced below for those interested. Sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 from “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” by Cicero are also reproduced in their exact original form, accompanied by English versions from the 1914 translation by H. Rackham.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The Colorado Extension

In 1914 the Federal government passed the Smith-Lever Act, which established a system of Cooperative Extensions at American land grant universities, including the Colorado Agricultural College (today’s Colorado State University). Extensions were set up to provide rural and agricultural communities with classes, clubs, demonstrations, and publications to help them learn about farm, garden, and home economics practices. To introduce Coloradans to the program, the Colorado Agricultural College and the U.S. Department of Agriculture produced the publication The Smith-Lever Act and What It Provides for Colorado Farmers and Housekeepers, which you can read online from our library.

Ten years after the Act, the university published Agricultural Extension in Colorado: A Record in Word and Picturealso available to view online from our library. This commemorative publication describes the purpose, activities, and successes of Colorado’s Extension, and is full of great photos of farm and rural life in Colorado in the ‘teens and ‘twenties.

Colorado’s extension work had actually preceded the Smith-Lever Act. In 1912, the Colorado Agricultural College sponsored the office of the “State Leader of Farm Management Field Studies and Demonstration for Colorado.” Logan County was the first Colorado county to appoint an extension agent that year, and several others followed over the next two years. Then, in 1914, after the Federal law went into effect, Colorado’s Extension became official through an agreement between the College and the U.S. government. For more on the history of the establishment of the Extension in Colorado, including legislation, see this section from the CSU Extension’s staff handbook. The Extension has also produced a short video on their history.

Since its founding, the Extension has produced hundreds of bulletins and fact sheets on a wide variety of topics. CSU’s Extension is still going strong today, with county extension offices, classes, volunteer programs like the Colorado Master Gardener Program and Planttalk, and much more, in addition to their publications. To learn about their work and how to get involved, visit the CSU Extenison’s website. To read Extension publications from a century ago to the present, search our library’s digital repository.

Inside the Weld County Extension Office, showing the many publications offered, 1924.
Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, February 15, 2019

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.  So get up from your desk, have a stretch, and let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Attention Worthy:

Small Business Revolution:  Canon City, Colorado is competing to be in a reality show called Small Business Revolution. The Canon City Library is heavily involved. They are the only Colorado town represented and have made it to the top 6. Now the winning city will be determined by who has the most votes from the public.  The winning city will get $500,000 for 6 main street businesses. The recipients will have access to marketing advice, business makeovers, as well as the reality show coming to Canon City, even non-profits can compete for the money! This could really help out the Canon City Library. Every vote counts and could help the Canon City area.  If you have the time and inclination, you can vote at – www.votecanoncity.com

CALCON Needs You:  CALCON2019 is starting to ramp up and they need you!  The deadline for submitting proposals is looming – March 1st.  Presenting at CALCON is a great experience and something anyone can do.  Why not take the plunge and give it a try.  Learn more here:  Deadline for CALCON Session Proposals is Coming Soon!

Also – once those program proposals come in – someone need to review them – and that is where CALCON needs you again.  They are looking for volunteers to reveiw proposals.  Share your knowledge, expertise and curiosity with others within the library profession in Colorado.  Get involved.  For more information, click here:  Call for Program Review Volunteers (CALCON)

Mancos Fun Run:  The Mancos Public Library is gearing up for the 6th Annual Mancos Cowboy Half Marathon, 5K and Fun Run on Saturday, June 22. This has turned into a really fun community event and fundraiser for us.Our race courses are beautiful and we get participants from 8-80. Last year was our biggest yet with 176 registered runners and walkers. We raised about $13,000 through sponsorships, donations, and registration fees. This event makes a great destination race as Mancos is located just five miles from Mesa Verde National Park and 30 miles from Durango.For the second year, we will have a team competition in the 5K — maybe we could get some library rivalries happening!Our race website is: http://mancoshalfmarathon.com

Going Fine Free:

  • Clear Creek County Library District:  In order to provide fair access to materials and to promote literacy in our communities, the Clear Creek County Library District is no longer charging fines for overdue reading materials, and all existing fines for overdue reading materials have been erased.

Grant/ Assistance Funding Opportunities:

Native American Library Services Basic Grants program:  Recently, IMLS announced an April 1 deadline for applications for the Native American Library Services Basic Grants program. Basic grants support existing tribal library operations and help maintain core library services. All federally recognized tribes and Alaskan Native villages and corporations with libraries are eligible and welcome to apply. Last year, IMLS awarded over 180 basic grants. They’ve put together a new list of tips to help you submit a successful application package this year—here’s what you need to know.  Read More.

CLIR recently opened our 2019 call for proposals for our Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives program.  Click for further details.

CHNC New Content Support Program:  

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.

Libraries Making News:

Pikes Peak Library District:

Learning for Everyone:

Citizen Science Day 2019: Add Real Scientific Research to Your Library Programming! – February 20, 3:00-4:00 PM CT – Citizen Science Day 2019 is Saturday, April 13th. You and your library are invited to participate in the Stall Catchers Megathon, in which people all over the world will analyze real research data in a game format that would normally take researchers over a year to complete. Join PSR for this webinar to learn more about Citizen Science (real people doing real science), and see how your library can get on board through citizen science activities and programming at different levels.

The Elephant in the Room: Helping Your Community Navigate the Financial Aspects of Healthcare – February 21, 2:00-3:00 PM CT – Financial health literacy occurs at the intersection of managing personal finances and health literacy. This hour-long webinar with GMR will explore the four components of financial health literacy and how librarians can support education and awareness to empower health consumers as they navigate complex issues of terminology, insurance, unexpected costs and financial barriers to healthcare. Better understanding the financial aspects of healthcare provides one key to unlocking health equity and wellness.

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – March 18, 12:00-1:00 PM CT – Sponsored by MAR, this class is designed to assist librarians, public health workers, health professionals, and the general public in locating authoritative information on nutrition and topics relating to nutrition. Background information on the importance of nutrition information to other health-related topics will be included, and resources for locating nutrition-related statistics and evidence-based practice will also be identified.

PubMed for Librarians: Introduction to PubMed – March 26, 1:00-2:30 PM CT – Attend this class to learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings.

CSL In Session:

  • Tear Down This Wall: Find & Remove Barriers to Library Use:  February 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – While your library is ADA compliant and welcomes all, there may be hidden barriers for some in your community that hinder them from using your library.  Join us for this interactive session to discuss how to find out who isn’t coming to your library and why, and talk through strategies for breaking down road blocks that some members of your community have to enable them to become more active library patrons.
  • Helping Patrons with Legal Questions: Part 1 – Legal Research Basics:  February 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – This first webinar in a series of three presented by the Colorado Association of Law Libraries and the Colorado State Library will address aspects of providing legal research services to patrons.  In this session, attendees will learn the following: what are the basic concepts involved in legal research; how to conduct a legal reference interview; and where to refer patrons in order to find forms and legal clinics.  This session will provide attendees with a basic overview of these concepts.  Sessions two and three will delve more into where to locate free legal research resources.

CLiC Spring Workshops:  The CLiC Spring Workshops are just around the corner and registration is open now.   The dates and locations for 2019 are: Grand Junction: March 21 & 22 @ Colorado Mesa University Fort Morgan: March 29 @ Fort Morgan High School Pueblo: April 15 & 16 @ CSU-Pueblo

Weekly Vocabulary Word:

This week’s word comes from the third century Ancient Greek.  You’ve met them, you’ve dined with them, perhaps you are one.  Deipnosophist – a person skilled in the art of dining and dinner-table conversation.  Having one of these around certainly takes the pressure off of the rest of us during meal times.  So – all hail the deipnosphist. We thank you for your gift.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Summer Reading/Summer Learning:  The Colorado State Library has once again renewed their support for ReadingRecord summer reading tracking software!  ReadingRecord is a web-based application for libraries to track reading program participants. It is a cloud (hosted) service, meaning that no additional equipment is required to use ReadingRecord. It can be used to track most any kind of reading program: traditional summer reading programs, winter reading programs, 1,000 books before kindergarten programs, year-long programs, etc.

Helping make history more accessible:  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is not just a spectator sport – you can help make history brighter and more accessible by getting involved.  Make your connection to history deeper by becoming a text corrector in the CHNC database.  It is easy, effective, rewarding, and really addictive.  Learn more about OCR correction and how you can participate here.

Library Related Employment:

Are you thinking of making a change this year in your job?  Check out Library Jobline for hot new library employment opportunities.

Have a great weekend everyone! This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries.   Whats going on at your library?  Let us know what you want to share!  Email Regan Harper, harper_r@cde.state.co.us.  Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

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Book Club Resource

Celebrating Black Voices with the Book Club Resource

The Colorado State Library would like to invite everyone to celebrate Black History Month with our newly updated Book Club Resource! Over the past year, we have refocused our energy toward making our book club collection more diverse and inclusive, so that readers from all cultures and backgrounds can find stories for them written by someone like them. This Black History Month, we are proud to highlight some of our favorite black voices as we remember the struggles of the past and work toward a more equitable future.

 

Citizen: An American Lyric
by Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine’s bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named “post-race” society.

 

The Underground Railroad
by Colson Whitehead

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned—Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

Like the protagonist of Gulliver’s Travels, Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey—hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre–Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.

 

March: Book 1
by John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper’s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

 

The Origins of Others
by Toni Morrison

America’s foremost novelist reflects on the themes that preoccupy her work and increasingly dominate national and world politics: race, fear, borders, the mass movement of peoples, the desire for belonging. What is race and why does it matter? What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid?

Drawing on her Norton Lectures, Toni Morrison takes up these and other vital questions bearing on identity in The Origin of Others. In her search for answers, the novelist considers her own memories as well as history, politics, and especially literature. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and Camara Laye are among the authors she examines. Readers of Morrison’s fiction will welcome her discussions of some of her most celebrated books―BelovedParadise, and A Mercy.

If we learn racism by example, then literature plays an important part in the history of race in America, both negatively and positively. Morrison writes about nineteenth-century literary efforts to romance slavery, contrasting them with the scientific racism of Samuel Cartwright and the banal diaries of the plantation overseer and slaveholder Thomas Thistlewood. She looks at configurations of blackness, notions of racial purity, and the ways in which literature employs skin color to reveal character or drive narrative. Expanding the scope of her concern, she also addresses globalization and the mass movement of peoples in this century. National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates provides a foreword to Morrison’s most personal work of nonfiction to date.

 

The Coldest Winter Ever
by Sister Souljah

During one of New York’s worst snow storms, Winter is born to Ricky Santiaga and his wife. At the age of sixteen, Winter is well-accustomed to a life of decadence provided by her notorious father who commands an intricate family web of drug dealers in their Brooklyn ghetto. As familiar as she is with riches, she is also acutely aware of the devastation of urban poverty to which she is determined never to succumb.

Her father’s decision to move his family to Dix Hills, an affluent Long Island suburb, creates unimaginable consequences. Winter is left alone to find her way precariously through the shifting maze of power, sex, money, and drugs, determined to vindicate her father and rise above the laws, social welfare system, poverty, and dangers that surround her.

Author Sister Souljah, a political activist, is a part of this story as a constant voice through all of Winter’s struggles. Winter hears Souljah’s voice intermittently on the radio and lives with her briefly while in pursuit of her own dubious ambitions. Souljah’s pleas to the young black women she works with to realize their dignity, beauty, and inner power fail to find a place to rest in Winter’s driven spirit.

The Coldest Winter Ever is a fast-moving, impeccably brilliant account of choices and consequences within the urban hip-hop culture. Sister Souljah writes eloquently with expressive insights and language of youth. Amidst the crisis and cruelty of inner city poverty and seemingly insurmountable struggles, Sister Souljah’s voice is one of grace and unmistakable clarity in one young woman’s coming-of-age story.

 

Celebrate black history all year long by checking out these and many other great titles from the Colorado State Library’s Book Club Resource!

(All book descriptions taken from Amazon.com)

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado’s Most Endangered Places

Every February, Colorado Preservation Inc. (CPI) releases their annual list of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places. The program brings awareness to historic buildings, landscapes, or archaeological sites around Colorado that are in danger of demolition, neglect, modification, or development. This year’s endangered places, highlighting the history of southern Colorado, are:

  • Adobe Potato Cellars of the San Luis Valley (Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, Rio Grande, and Saguache Counties)
  • Hose Company No. 3 Fire Museum (Pueblo County)
  • Iglesia De San Antonio-Tiffany Catholic Church (La Plata County)
  • McIntire Ranch and Mansion (Conejos County)
  • R&R Market (Costilla County)

The Culebra River Villages of Costilla County, Colorado, a Colorado Historical Society publication available from our library, mentions the history of the adobe potato cellars:

An important consideration involved storage. When Anglo growers first marketed potatoes they stored surpluses above ground in circular wire-frames encased with hay or in straw-covered trenches. However, the Rio Culebra farmers preferred to store potatoes in a large, underground cellars, or soterranos. Because Hispano[s] used earth, not sod, for walls, their structures maintain an even temperature that kept potatoes from freezing. Hispano subterranean structures were so efficient and cheap to fabricate that Anglo farmers throughout the San Luis Valley adopted double-wall adobe construction for their above-ground storage facilities.

Adobe potato cellars in Rio Grande County, Colorado, circa 1939. Courtesy Library of Congress.

A second Historical Society publication offers information about Conejos County’s McIntire Ranch. An Archaeological Inventory in the Pike’s Stockade Area, Conejos County, Colorado discusses the ranch site‘s historical and archaeological resources, including what remains of the large adobe ranch house. The ranch belonged to Albert McIntire, governor of Colorado from 1895 to 1897. You can read about adobe construction in Adobe as a Building Material for the Plains and Adobe Brick for Farm Buildings, two early-twentieth-century publications from the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station.

To learn more about historic preservation and its impact on Colorado communities, see Preservation for a Changing Colorado, a 2017 publication of CPI and History Colorado. Search our library’s online catalog for more Colorado history resources.

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: President Lincoln’s Birthday

Today marks Abraham Lincoln’s 210th birthday. America’s most beloved President was born on February 12, 1809, in a log cabin in Kentucky, although he lived most of his life in Illinois (aside from his time in Washington, D.C.). In the decades following his death, several efforts were made to make Lincoln’s birthday a national holiday, but were unsuccessful. President’s Day, however, honors Lincoln as well as George Washington, who was also born in February. Lincoln’s birthday is a state holiday in five states, but not in Colorado.

Our state has found other ways to honor Lincoln, however, including Lincoln County and even Lincoln Street in Denver. Colorado-quarried Yule Marble was used to build the Lincoln Memorial. And although Lincoln never visited here, Colorado Territory was established on February 28, 1861 — less than a week before Lincoln’s first inauguration — so it was the country’s newest territory at the time of his presidency.

In the early 1900s, the state’s Department of Public Instruction — now the Department of Education — issued books for teachers with lessons, stories, poems, and recitations in honor of Lincoln’s and Washington’s birthdays. Annual volumes of Birthdays of Washington & Lincoln have been digitized and made available online by our library.  The 1909 issue in particular is a special “centennial number” for Lincoln. Each volume gives fascinating insight not only on the lives of the presidents, but on the values, political atmosphere, and patriotism of the era in which the books were published. These volumes provide valuable primary source material for anyone researching American education and culture a century ago.

Finally, be sure to check out the Library of Congress’s website, where you can view the digitized Abraham Lincoln Papers.

 

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Native American Tribal Membership

How do you become an official member of a Native American Tribe in Colorado? The Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs has put together a helpful FAQ document to answer your questions about obtaining membership in a federally recognized Tribe. “Each of the Tribes has its own right to determine the standards for becoming a member,” the document advises, so you must contact the Tribe directly to find out their requirements. Most Tribes will require proof of descendancy, so the document provides helpful guidance on researching and documenting your genealogy. You can also find more information in the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Guide to Tracing Your American Indian Ancestry.

For additional information about Colorado’s Native American Tribes today, see the following publications:

Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, February 8, 2019

More on Runge:  Born in Germany in 1794, Runge not only discovered caffeine, but also isolated quinine, invented paper chromatography, and discovered the toxic effects of atropine.  The good news is, he was also reported to have directed his chemical knowledge towards household problems, such as removing stains, making wines from fruits, canning meats and vegetables, and showing off his culinary skill at dinner parties.  Coffee and culinary skills… he’s a keeper folks.

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.  So kick back, grab a cup of caffeine, however you take it – and an slice of Käsekuchen …and let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Libraries Take Action:

Library Lobby Day:  Posted on behalf of  CAL Lobby Day Committee (Ray Coffey, Miranda Doran-Myers, Ellen Patterson, and Lauren Seegmiller)

The Colorado General Assembly will soon be finalizing the state budget. The CAL Legislative Committee needs your help in trying to secure more money for Colorado Libraries. Tell your legislators the stories of how your library impacts your community by participating in Library Lobby Day.

The CAL Legislative Committee’s core messaging for the 2019 session is “Libraries Build Community.” In addition to thanking legislators for current appropriation of $2.5M for State Grants to Libraries, they are asking for an increase of $2M to invest in educational materials and for continued support of the rights of individuals to conduct research and explore new ideas. Additional funding helps support free access to information, which in turn supports an informed citizenry and enriches our democracy.

They are promoting three ways to reach out to the Colorado General Assembly in Spring 2019:

  • Meet with your legislator one-on-one during the week of March 11-15 (or when you can).
  • Be visible at Library Lobby Day on the morning of Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at the State Capitol.
  • Send written materials to be included along with other information about the impact state funding has on Colorado Libraries.

If you would like to participate in Lobby Day in any of the above ways, the CAL Legislative Committee is here to support you! If you’d like join them at the capitol, send a letter to your legislator, need additional information, or have any other questions, please email lseegmiller@denverlibrary.org.

Going Fine Free:

  • Fine Free Basalt:  We are excited to announce the removal of late/overdue fines on all youth library card holders, and on all children’s and young adult library materials.  Late fines shouldn’t be a barrier to accessing the library, and now they no longer will be. To learn more, please visit our website at basaltlibrary.org/fine-free-basalt
  • The Broomfield Library is Officially Fine-Free! What does that mean? All your favorite Library services with NO fines! Fine-Free libraries ultimately remove barriers to serving the community. They allow for more people to take advantage of library services,free up library staff time to serve the public better, and often results in FEWER overdue materials.Find out more from Library and Cultural Affairs Director,Abby Yellman HERE!
  • Denver Public Library:  As of Jan. 1, we’ve eliminated fines for overdue materials in an attempt to reduce barriers for our most vulnerable customers. We’re even forgiving most customers’ overdue fines to get folks back in the doors and borrowing again. Read more about this change and what it means for you as a borrower.

Open Educational Resources: The Colorado Commission on Higher Education approved 20 proposals that will provide nearly $550,000 in funding for higher education Open Educational Resources (OER) projects throughout the state.“I applaud the work of the commission to bolster innovation and save our students money,” said Governor Jared Polis. “These grants will no doubt have a huge impact on the future of OER and inspire other higher education institutions in the state to follow suit with creative and impactful solutions.”  To learn more about this and related issues – click here.

Grant/ Assistance Funding Opportunities:

Grants Promote Innovative Pre-K-12 Projects:  Ezra Jack Keats Foundation: Mini-Grant Program – The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation offers Mini-Grants of up to $500 to public schools, public libraries, and public preschool and Head Start programs in the United States and its territories. The Foundation accepts proposals for creative, innovative projects that give teachers and librarians a unified, flexible way to meet Common Core goals as well as offer students a fun experience, a sense of achievement, and a source of pride. Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grants have funded projects in all disciplines, at all grade levels, and of all sizes. Approximately 70 projects are funded each year. The application deadline is March 31, 2019. Visit the Foundation’s website to learn more about the application process.

CHNC New Content Support Program:  

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.

Libraries Making News:

Learning for Everyone:

Colorado ILL Conference:  The keynote for the Colorado ILL Conference has been announced.  Kyle Courtney, Copyright Adviser for Harvard University,  is the keynote speaker for this year’s  50th CO Interlibrary Loan conference   , which will be held at the Westin in Westminster, CO April 25, 26th.  Courtney is a prolific writer and speaker on copyright and serves as the copyright and information policy adviser for HarvardX/edX.  He has also presented at the 2017 and 2018 UCCS Kraemer Library Copyright conference.

Courtney is founder of Copyright First Responders, a service that supports teaching, learning and scholarship through community engagement with copyright. In 2014 Courtney founded Fair Use Week which has become an international celebration observed by over 100 universities, libraries and other organizations.   He was named a National Academic Library Mover and Shaker by Library Journal in 2015.  Courtney currently teaches research sessions at Harvard Law School to first year students. He has a dual appointment at Northeastern teaching “Cyberlaw: Privacy, Ethics, and Digital Rights” ,  “Legal Research and Writing for LLM’s” and “Advanced Legal Writing Workshop” .   Courtney has a J.D. with distinction in Intellectual Property Law and an MSLIS.  You will find his writings in Politico, Slate, Library Journal, and other publications.  Courtney’s most recent publication is titled “MOOC’s and Libraries”, published by Rowman & Littlefield, Ltd.  His blog is at http://kylecourtney.com and you can follow him onTwitter @KyleKCourtney.

CAL Maker Division Workshop:  Save the date for the 2nd annual CAL Maker Division Workshop! This year’s workshop will be held at the Central Library (10 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy, Denver, 80204), and will be a full day of maker-related sessions. Stay tuned to the CAL website for registration details, coming soon.In order to have a fantastic workshop, the Division needs presenters who are willing to facilitate a 75 minute session on a topic related to making or makerspaces. If you have an idea for a possible session, please submit your session idea before February 24. If you’re thinking “Wow, that seems close to the CALCON submission deadline of March 1,” you’d be right. The Division is encouraging people to submit their ideas to the Conference as well as the Workshop, even if there are very few changes (if any) between the two. Any questions can be sent to me or to calmakerdivision@gmail.com.

CSL In Session:

  • Tear Down This Wall: Find & Remove Barriers to Library Use:  February 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – While your library is ADA compliant and welcomes all, there may be hidden barriers for some in your community that hinder them from using your library.  Join us for this interactive session to discuss how to find out who isn’t coming to your library and why, and talk through strategies for breaking down road blocks that some members of your community have to enable them to become more active library patrons.
  • Helping Patrons with Legal Questions: Part 1 – Legal Research Basics:  February 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – This first webinar in a series of three presented by the Colorado Association of Law Libraries and the Colorado State Library will address aspects of providing legal research services to patrons.  In this session, attendees will learn the following: what are the basic concepts involved in legal research; how to conduct a legal reference interview; and where to refer patrons in order to find forms and legal clinics.  This session will provide attendees with a basic overview of these concepts.  Sessions two and three will delve more into where to locate free legal research resources.

CLiC Spring Workshops:  The CLiC Spring Workshops are just around the corner and registration is open now.   The dates and locations for 2019 are: Grand Junction: March 21 & 22 @ Colorado Mesa University Fort Morgan: March 29 @ Fort Morgan High SchoolPueblo: April 15 & 16 @ CSU-Pueblo

Interesting Info:

CLiC Vendor Discount Program:   CLiC’s 2019 Vendor Discount list has added TWO more companies!Check out the new additions at: www.clicweb.org/save-money/vendor-discounts

Louisville Public Library:  Louisville’s Great Horned Owl Cam:   http://www.louisvilleco.gov/residents/departments/parks-recreation-and-open-space/louisville-great-horned-owls

Weekly Vocabulary Word:

In homage to last weeks word which was the longest non medical word in the English language – we have this weeks word: sesquipedalian.  Sesquipedalian describes the tendency to use long words. If you possess this trait, you will enjoy trying to use this word in your next conversation.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Library Related Employment:

Are you thinking of making a change this year in your job?  Check out Library Jobline for hot new library employment opportunities.

Have a great weekend everyone! This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries.   Whats going on at your library?  Let us know what you want to share!  Email Regan Harper, harper_r@cde.state.co.us.  Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado Downtown Streets

Safety, walkability, transportation, and aesthetic design are all important components of planning a downtown commercial area, whether in a large city or a small town. Downtowns and “Main Streets” can, if well planned, boost tourism and enhance quality of life for residents. Therefore the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the Colorado Department of Transportation teamed up to produce the guidebook Colorado Downtown Streets: A Tool for Communities, Planners, and Engineers, which you can view online from our library. The agency partners provide the following summary:

Great streets are more than infrastructure: they are the fundamental building blocks of successful communities. [Colorado Downtown Streets is] designed to help local leaders, community members, and technical professionals work together to transform their streets into safe, accessible, and vibrant places.

Use this guidebook to learn how well-planned streets can promote health, increase tax revenue and property values, attract tourists, and contribute to the life of the community by giving the city or town its own identity. Design considerations, such as bike lanes, traffic flow patterns, on-street parking, landscaping, lighting, and signage, are provided along with examples from towns and cities around the state. Tips for planning, implementing and funding are also provided, as are tools for enhancing “placemaking” and revitalizing historic areas.

To supplement the guidebook, a webinar and several companion videos were created, which you can view here. The guide was published as a component of the Colorado Main Street Program, which you can learn more about on the Department of Local Affairs’ website. You can also find more resources from state agencies about city planning and transportation by searching our library’s online catalog.

 

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The WPA in Colorado

During the height of the Great Depression, as banks failed, unemployment soared, and farm prices dropped, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was established as one of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal projects. The WPA focused on creating and providing jobs rather than handing out direct relief. Most of the WPA jobs were aimed at civic improvements, such as public buildings and roads. Thousands of out-of-work artists and artisans, architects, musicians, writers, historians, and others who had previously been employed in creative or intellectual fields were given temporary work. Parks, trails, bridges, public buildings, artworks, and literary projects produced by the WPA continue to be enjoyed to this day.

Colorado’s division of the WPA issued The WPA Worker: A Monthly Pictorial Journal for Workers and Citizens of Colorado Interested in the Statewide Projects of Works Progress AdministrationIssues from 1936 and 1937 have recently been digitized by our library. Each issue of this amazing periodical highlights WPA projects in all corners of the state. These included many construction projects like public buildings, roads, bridges, stadiums, and parks, but also included such varied activities as

As Coloradans suffered from the effects of the Great Depression, the WPA enhanced life in every part of the state, and often undertook long overdue projects that in many cases would not have been otherwise completed. Many of the projects continue to enhance our lives today.

For more resources on the WPA in Colorado, see the following publications available from our library:

Aguilar’s city hall was constructed by the WPA.

 

The playground at Lake Junior High in Denver was also a WPA project.

 

Old infrastructure was replaced across the state.
Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Starting a Charter School

This is the time of year when those interested in establishing a new charter school need to begin the application process. Charter school establishment is overseen by the Colorado Department of Education’s Charter School Institute (CSI). They require a letter of intent to be filed by March 1, and the completed application is due March 28. For application materials and a full list of important dates, see the CSI website. Also be sure to view the Colorado Department of Education’s online Charter Schools Guidebook and Colorado Charter Schools webpage for important information.

Our library has many resources that can help guide you in the process of establishing a new school, or simply to help you understand how charter schools operate in Colorado. See the following resources for information:

Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, February 1, 2019

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library. So kick back, grab your favorite cocktail and an amuse-bouche or two…and let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

February is Black History Month:

Denver Pubic Library:

  • Juanita Gray Community Service Awards Ceremony:  Saturday, Feb. 2, 1:30–3:30 p.m. @ Blair-Caldwell. Join DPL as they honor African American community leaders at the annual Juanita Gray Community Service Awards Ceremony. They’ll honor men, women and youth making outstanding contributions to the Denver metro area and who have accomplished a professional goal in their field. They’ll also induct Dr. Jennie Mae Rucker (posthumously) into the Blacks in Colorado Hall of Fame.
  • The Uncomfortable Truth: The History of Racism in America Film Screening:  Wednesday, Feb. 6, 6-7:45 p.m. @ Blair-Caldwell. Come watch a comprehensive and insightful exploration of the origins and history of racism in America—from slavery to Jim Crow era, from lynchings to protests—told through a very personal and honest story.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.: Thursday, Feb. 14, 1-2 p.m. @ Sam Gary  It’s been over 50 years since Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. Join Active Minds to take a look at his life and legacy, and trace Dr. King’s rise to prominence from a Baptist pastor to Nobel Prize winner and leader of the civil rights movement.
  • The Life of Booker T. Washington: A Family Perspective:  Saturday, Feb. 23, 2-3 p.m. @ Woodbury.  Eric Hughes, the great-grandson of Booker T. Washington, tells a visual story of the life of this remarkable American. Using family photographs and other illustrations, the exceptional history of Dr. Washington comes alive in this presentation. Q&A to follow.
  • Black History Live: Maya Angelou:  Saturday, Feb. 23, 2:30-3:30 p.m. @ Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales.  National Humanities and Chautauqua scholar Becky Stone will portray Dr. Maya Angelou, American poet, singer, memoirist and civil rights activist. Dr. Angelou will share how language can build, heal and transform. She gives insight into how she writes and why and reflects on her philosophy of life.
  • Nnedi Okorafor:  Thursday, February 7Embassy Suites DTC10250 E. Costilla Ave., Centennial – 7-8 pm: Author Talk 8-9 pm: Book Signing.  Spend an evening with award-winning and New York Times best-selling author Nnedi Okorafor, who will share about her acclaimed novel, Who Fears Death, slated to be an HBO series. Okorafor’s African-based science fiction and fantasy novels include the “Binti” trilogy and Akata Witch. She has also authored several of the popular “Black Panther” Marvel comic books. Okorafor’s latest standalone series features Black Panther’s sister Shuri.  Enjoy light refreshments and an author signing. Buy books from Book Bar onsite. For teens and adults. Reserve your spot here.

Longmont Public Library:

  • Black History Live: Maya AngelouThursday, February 28, 7 to 8:30 pm.  Storyteller Becky Stone will bring author and poet Maya Angelou to life in this special performance to honor Black History Month.  This program is for ages 18+ only and is offered in partnership with Colorado Humanities and is part of a larger Black History Live tour created and funded by them.

What is your library doing for Black History Month – let us know so that we can share!

The Public:

Hey – you have heard about the movie The Public by Emilio Estevez.  It was initially released in 2018, and tells the tale of  a large group of homeless library patrons, faced with a brutal Midwestern cold front making its way to Cincinnati, Ohio, who refuse to leave the downtown public library at closing time. What begins as a nonviolent Occupy sit-in and ragtag act of civil disobedience quickly escalates into a standoff with local riot police, led by a no-nonsense crisis negotiator (Alec Baldwin) and a savvy district attorney (Christian Slater) with lofty political ambitions, all as two librarians (Emilio Estevez and Jena Malone) are caught up in the middle of it.  Well – it is rumored that this film will be released to main stream cinemas in April of this year.  But – if you would like to see it before it hits a multi=plex near you, Boulder Public Library will be hosting a screening of the film as part of their Boulder International Film Festival series, with Director, and 80’s heart throb Emilio Estevez in attendance.  Mr. Estevez will offer a special and private screening for library workers on the afternoon of March 1 at Boulder Public Library while he’s in the area. And you are invited!

  • Friday, March 1, 2p.m. at the Canyon Theater (1000 Canyon Boulevard, North entrance at Boulder Public Library, Main Library; parking is also available at 1001 Arapahoe Avenue at the South Library entrance; please note: you must pay for parking if you stay in the lots 90+ minutes; look for the parking pay machines in each lot; the downtown Boulder bus station is also just a few blocks away)
  • Seating is limited to 201 people, first-come, first-served (no tickets or RSVPs). Please arrive before 2 p.m. for seating before the film starts.
  • The film is 2 hours long and Mr. Estevez will also likely speak/answer questions, as he wants to spend time with library workers after being inspired by this film role.

See you all there!

Grant/ Assistance Funding Opportunities:

Support for Innovative Programs Serving Colorado Seniors: NextFifty Initiative

NextFifty Initiative is dedicated to funding mission-driven, innovative programs that improve community services for those age 50 and older, including adults with disabilities, and their caretakers. The majority of funded programs will directly serve the people of Colorado. Grants are provided to nonprofit organizations and government agencies that are working to improve the lives of the current aging population and dedicated to crafting an exciting future for aging. NextFifty Initiative is also interested in projects that target the most vulnerable in the aging sector, including low-income individuals, ethnic and racial minorities, the homeless, and LGBT communities. The upcoming grant application deadline is February 28, 2019.

Visit the NextFifty Initiative website to review the funding guidelines and submit an online application.

Funds Available for Native American Libraries: Institute of Museum and Library Services

The Native American Library Services: Basic Grants program provides support for existing library operations and to maintain core library services. Support is also available to enhance efforts to recruit future professionals to the field of library and information services. The application deadline is April 1, 2019.

CHNC New Content Support Program:  

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.

Libraries Making News:

Learning for Everyone:

The 2019 CATS Winter Workshop will be held on Monday, February 4th 2019 at Library 21C 1175 Chapel Hills Dr. Colorado Springs, CO 80920 from 9-4.

The Colorado Council of the International Reading Association (CCIRA) Conference will be at the Denver Marriott Tech Center February 6 – 9, 2019. CCIRA collaboratively encourages, supports, and advances literacy through research-based instructional practices to increase literacy access to all.

Conference on Inclusive Education:  February 14 – February 15 – PEAK Parent Center’s annual Conference on Inclusive Education is an excellent professional and personal development opportunity for EVERY PERSON involved in the education and inclusion of diverse learners. Family members, youth, self-advocates, general and special education teachers, school administrators, college students and other professionals are all encouraged to attend!

Teacher-Librarian Day 2019:  February 15 @ 7:30 am – 3:30 pm – The day consists of a suite of short, carefully prepared talks, demonstrations, and performances on a varying range of subjects to foster learning, inspiration, and wonder – and to provoke conversations that matter. The 2019 theme is Voices; recognizing every voice and developing these skills in our students through primary sources as windows of the past help our communities to become more civically minded, thoughtful, and curious.

CSL In Session:

  • Tear Down This Wall: Find & Remove Barriers to Library Use:  February 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – While your library is ADA compliant and welcomes all, there may be hidden barriers for some in your community that hinder them from using your library.  Join us for this interactive session to discuss how to find out who isn’t coming to your library and why, and talk through strategies for breaking down road blocks that some members of your community have to enable them to become more active library patrons.
  • Helping Patrons with Legal Questions: Part 1 – Legal Research Basics:  February 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – This first webinar in a series of three presented by the Colorado Association of Law Libraries and the Colorado State Library will address aspects of providing legal research services to patrons.  In this session, attendees will learn the following: what are the basic concepts involved in legal research; how to conduct a legal reference interview; and where to refer patrons in order to find forms and legal clinics.  This session will provide attendees with a basic overview of these concepts.  Sessions two and three will delve more into where to locate free legal research resources.

Social Justice & Public Libraries Symposium:  February 25 – February 26 – The Public Library Association is hosting this regional symposium on equity, diversity, inclusion, and social justice for public libraries in Denver. During this one-and-a-half-day symposium we will explore how power and privilege operate inter-personally and institutionally; identify how oppression shows up in our communities and libraries; and learn about historical and contemporary social justice movements. Participants will hear from libraries putting equity into practice, develop regional connections, and create local action plans to advance equity and social justice in our organizations and communities.  The symposium agenda and registration are available at:  http://www.ala.org/pla/education/inperson/equity

Free online CE for Library professionals and paraprofessionals:  Once again – our Wyoming counterpart has stepped up to the plate – swung – and hit it out of the park with their aggregated list of free CE opportunities.  Thank you Wyoming State Library for being the best in the west!  Check out the list of amazing free opportunities here.

Save the date and plan a weekend in beautiful Steamboat Springs this summer:  The Colorado Reference Service Group has a date for a summer meet up. The meeting will take place on Friday, August 9th, at Bud Werner Memorial Library, Steamboat Springs. More details to follow. Save the date and plan a weekend in beautiful Steamboat Springs this summer.

CLiC Spring Workshops:  The CLiC Spring Workshops are just around the corner and registration is open now.   The dates and locations for 2019 are: Grand Junction: March 21 & 22 @ Colorado Mesa University Fort Morgan: March 29 @ Fort Morgan High SchoolPueblo: April 15 & 16 @ CSU-Pueblo

Library Creation and Learning Website:  Do you make use of the Library Creation and Learning website?  Well you should!  This site, developed by the Colorado State Library, is your portal to library continuing education opportunities and information.  At the site you will find:

  • Online courses
  • Training information and curriculum for both staff and the public
  • Library Makerspaces
  • Software and hardware information
  • Information about library customer service, intellectual freedom, privacy and confidentiality, and professional ethics.

Please contact Christine Kreger with any questions you may have or recommendations for content.  We would love to hear from you.

Talk about Awesome:

Poudre River Library District:

  • Great Decisions — Topic 1: Refugees and Global Migration: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 05, 2019.  7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Old Town Library, Large Meeting Room Combo – Today, no countries have open borders. Every state in today’s global system has its own laws and policies about who is permitted to cross its borders, and how they will do so. Who determines whether someone is a refugee or a migrant? How have different countries, including the United States, reacted to migration? How effective are the international laws, policies and organizations that have evolved to assist and protect refugees and migrants?More about this Foreign Policy Association program is at http://www.fpa.org/great_decisions/.
  • Part 1: Selecting the Audit Service and Provider Right for Your Nonprofit: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 06, 20193:00 PM – 4:30 PM Harmony Library, Community Room (H)  – Join Nonprofit CPA, Chyla Graham for the first in a three-part series on audits for your nonprofit.Part 1 will examine the different types of attest (audit-type) services and what may serve your organization best. Once you know what type of services you need it’s easier to ask for it and determine who can best provide the level of service necessary. Takeaways:1. Different types of attest services – How to decide which one is right for you.2. What questions should you ask the prospective auditor?3. What should you ask their references?

Douglas County Libraries:

  • Steve Berry – Author Visit:  Tuesday, March 5th at 6:30pm at Douglas County Libraries in Parker has NYT bestselling author Steve Berry coming to talk about his book The Malta Exchange which hits the selves that day. Books will be sold at the event.
  • Lisa See – Author Visit”  Saturday, March 9th at 7pm at Douglas County Libraries in Castle Rock has NYT bestselling author Lisa See who will talk about her new book The Islands of Sea Women. Books will be sold at the event.
  • Kirk W. Johnson  – Author Visit:  Tuesday, June 25th at 6:30pm at Douglas County Libraries in Highlands Ranch has Kirk W. Johnson who will talk about The Feather Thief, one of the most notable nonfiction, true crime books of 2018.

For all events, please register at DCL.org, click Library Events and then Authors & Events.

Boulder Public Library:

  • History Lecture with Dr. Andrés Reséndez.  Thursday, Feb. 7, 5 – 6:30 p.m., Canyon Theater:  Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in the Americas. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez illuminates in his myth-shattering book, The Other Slavery, the subject of this year’s Athearn Lecture, it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. Andrés Reséndez is an award-winning historian and author specializing in colonial Latin America, borderlands, and the Iberian world. His most recent book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Slavery in America (2016), won the Bancroft Prize in American History and was a finalist for a National Book Award in Nonfiction. The History Department at CU Boulder is proud to partner with the Boulder Public Library to present the 30th Athearn Lecture in Western History. Reception and book-signing to follow the talk.

Eagle Valley Library District:

High Country Speaker Series presentsWildlife in the Rocky Mountains: The hidden stories of conservation, recreation, and sharing our communities with charismatic fauna. Join the Eagle Valley Library District and Walking Mountains Science Center in welcoming a variety of experts and authors for a conversation about the interesting intersection between humans and wildlife. For more information please visit evld.org.  HCSS events aim to encourage environmental awareness, inspire positive relationships with the natural world and create thought provoking dialogue in our community through FREE dynamic programming.

High Country Speaker Series Schedule:

Weekly Vocabulary Word:

I often find that I come across interesting words that have fallen out of common use in the English language – but that deserve to be pulled back into the light at least once more.  So – going forward, we will give these lost words a bit of sunlight here in the grab bag.   I challenge you to find a use for this weeks word… well – I challenge you to even be able to pronounce it.

floccinaucinihilipilification: noun RARE

  1. the action or habit of estimating something as worthless.  Often cited as the longest non-technical word in the English language, being one letter longer than the commonly cited antidisestablishmentarianism.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Plains to Peaks Collective Grows (I know this is a repeat from last week – but we are pretty darn proud of it.)

The Colorado State Library and the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC) are excited to announce that our partners have recently shared new historic collections with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).  The PPC partners now offer 181,001 items for research and discovery through the DPLA.

With this second collection of items, the PPC welcomes new partners: American Alpine Club; University of Colorado, Art Museum; University of Wyoming, Art Museum; Mountain Scholar with collections from Colorado State University Libraries; University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Strauss Health Sciences Library and University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Kraemer Family Library.  Check out this link to see what is there.

Library Related Employment:

Are you thinking of making a change this year in your job?  Check out Library Jobline for hot new library employment opportunities.

Have a great weekend everyone! This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries.   Whats going on at your library?  Let us know what you want to share!  Email Regan Harper, harper_r@cde.state.co.us.  Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Auto Theft Prevention Resources

Motor vehicle theft is on the rise, according to statistics from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. There were 22,206 cases of auto theft in 2017, a 72{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} increase from 2014! Less than half of the vehicles were recovered. And vehicle break-ins are one of the most common types of property crimes in Colorado.

So what can you do to help protect your vehicle from theft or break-in? What should you do if one happens? And if you’re buying a used car, how do you make sure it’s not stolen?

The Colorado State Patrol has put together a helpful list of resources to answer these questions. The list includes links to information and tips from insurance groups, government agencies, and auto associations about how to protect yourself. Also included are links to auto prevention authorities in other states, since stolen vehicles frequently cross state lines. Resources like a VIN Decoder are also provided to help you verify if a car you wish to purchase had been stolen. You’ll also find links to neighborhood crime reports to help you find out about crime rates in your area, since one third of all vehicle thefts occur at the owner’s home.

You can also find helpful information at lockdownyourcar.org, a website sponsored by the Colorado Automobile Theft Prevention Authority (CATPA), a division of the State Patrol. See this publication to learn about what CATPA is doing to reduce vehicle thefts in Colorado. Statistics and information is also available in their annual report.

Did you know that the highest number of vehicle thefts occur between 6 and 9 a.m.? This may be because drivers often leave their cars idling and unattended on cold mornings. There are many things you can do to help reduce the risk of having your car stolen or vandalized, so check out these handy resources to help increase your awareness.

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: History of Aspen, Colorado

Today, Aspen’s riches come from the ski industry — but they used to come from silver mining. Aspen was founded in 1879, during the glory days of Colorado silver mining — the same era when mining boomtowns like Leadville and Georgetown were being established. With seemingly endless amounts of silver in the nearby Elk and Sawatch mountains, Aspen thrived until 1893, when economic disaster struck. That year, Congress repealed the Sherman Silver Purchase Act, under which the federal government had purchased millions of ounces of silver for coinage. Without a market for the silver, Aspen and the other boomtowns nearly became ghost towns.

Despite a steady decline in population, and area mines and railroads going bankrupt, Aspen managed to survive — but it needed something to sustain it. Tourism, and the newly fashionable sport of skiing, became the answer. In 1924, the Independence Pass Highway was completed, making travel to Aspen easier. Then, in 1936, Aspen’s first ski lodge was opened, ushering in the industry that would give rebirth to the town. Ski enthusiasts and wealthy vacationers descended on Aspen. In 1946, the area’s first chairlift opened, the longest in the world at the time, according to an article in the Colorado Encyclopedia. New ski resorts opened, and Aspen continued to thrive.

It wasn’t just skiing that made Aspen famous, however. It became known as a center for arts and culture, hosting such notable events as the Aspen Music Festival, the International Design Conference, and the Aspen Institute. Today, Aspen is known as a playground for celebrities, with some of the most expensive real estate in the United States — a far cry from the Silver Crash days.

You can read more about Aspen in numerous publications from our library; many are available online. In 1958, William Wardell wrote a delightful article in the Colorado Historical Society’s Colorado Magazine, sharing his memories of childhood in Aspen before the Silver Crash. You can also read about Aspen during the mining years in Aspen: The History of a Silver Mining Town, 1879-1893, which is available for checkout.

Over the past several decades the University of Colorado’s business school has prepared numerous studies on Aspen tourism, including:

The University’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research also published several studies on Aspen environmental issues, including Quality Skiing at Aspen, Colorado (1975) and Landslides Near Aspen, Colorado (1976).

Other historical resources on Aspen available from our library include highway studies, air quality studies, a 1965 report on the Aspen general area plan, and, more recently, Climate Change and Aspen from 2006. Search our online catalog for titles. Finally, be sure to check out the Aspen Historical Society’s website for a historical timeline, digital archives, and more.

 

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Colorado Colleges and Universities: Colorado Mesa University

Founded in 1925, today’s Colorado Mesa University has grown and evolved significantly since its beginnings. Located in Grand Junction, the school started out as a junior college, then began offering baccalaureate degrees in 1974 and master’s degrees in 1996. In 1988 the school’s name changed from Mesa College to Mesa State College. Then, in 2011, the Colorado State Legislature officially changed the institution’s name to Colorado Mesa University, reflecting its expansion and evolution.

Today Colorado Mesa University has an enrollment of about 11,000 students; about 15 percent of the student body comes from out of state. The university has thirteen academic departments offering a variety of courses of study. In addition to its main campus in Grand Junction, CMU also has a campus in Montrose. Also part of the CMU network is Western Colorado Community College, an open admission college from which many students transfer to CMU.

Researchers looking for information about Colorado Mesa University, including historical information on Mesa College and Mesa State, can find many resources in our library. These include budgets and financial audits going back to the 1970s; catalogs from Mesa CollegeMesa State College and Colorado Mesa University; security reports; and more. Other reports include a 2012 admissions policy study; economic impact studies, annual statistical data, and 2013 self-study.

A number of research publications from the institution are also available from our library. Several issues of the Journal of the Western Slope, Mesa State College’s history magazine exploring life in Grand Junction and the surrounding area, have been digitized. CMU also sponsors the Ruth Powell Hutchins Water Center, publishing an annual report and technical report series. The center has also produced a documentary video, Water in the Desert, that you can view online or check out from our library on DVD.

To find more publications, search our library’s online catalog.

Categories
Book Club Resource CSL News

CSL Book Club Resource Brief Hiatus Beginning January 31st

The Colorado State Library’s Book Club Resource and Resource Kit Program will be taking a brief hiatus while our friends at the Colorado Library Consortium (CLiC) complete their AspenCat migration, which is scheduled to begin the first week of February. During this time, we will not be able to add or change any records, or operate any circulation through the system. As a result, the Book Club Resource and Resource Kit Program will not be accepting any hold requests after 10:00 pm on January 31st. We do apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you and hope that the process will go as quickly and smoothly as possible.

If you would like to place a request for your a book club set or resource kit, please do so as soon as possible.  While we do not have an exact date for the completion of the migration, we know that our friends at CLiC will be working tirelessly to get us back up and running. We will, of course, still be accepting any returns that you might have during this time. So if you’ve been considering a title for your book club or planning a program with one of our resource kits, go ahead and snag it today! And as always, if you have any questions, issues, or concerns now or during the hiatus, please contact Madison Basch at basch_m@cde.state.co.us.

Categories
CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, Friday January 25, 2019

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library. Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!  

Grant/ Assistance Funding Opportunities:

Annual Colorado Teen Literature Conference:

Grants are now available for teens and adults to attend the 31st Annual Colorado Teen Literature Conference on Saturday, April 13th, 2019, featuring keynote authors Sandhya Menon and Bill Konigsberg. This annual conference offers breakout sessions that have appeal for teens, educators, librarians, and anyone interested in teen literature.

The conference will be held at the Tivoli Conference Center (900 Auraria Parkway, Denver CO, 80204) on the Auraria Campus. Grant applications for the 2019 conference are open starting November 15th, 2018. The deadline for all grants is January 25th, 2019. All applicants will be notified of final decisions by email.

All grants include conference registrations ($75 for adults and $40 for students), breakfast snacks and lunch at the conference. Grants are awarded before general registration opens. If you do not receive a grant you may register for the conference starting February 4th.  For more information – click here.

Council on Library and Information Resources: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives

Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives, a program of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), is intended to help digitize and provide access to collections of rare or unique content in cultural heritage institutions. The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution. Collections proposed for digitization may be in any format or relevant to any subject. Grants, ranging from a minimum of $50,000 to a maximum of $250,000 in the case of a single-institution project or $500,000 for a collaborative project, will be provided to colleges and universities, research centers, museums, libraries, historical societies, cultural associations, and select government units. Online initial proposals must be submitted by April 3, 2019; final proposals are due September 17, 2019. Visit the CLIR website to review the program guidelines and application process.

Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation supports nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and libraries that offer literacy programs in communities served by Dollar General in 44 states. The Foundation provides support through the following grant programs: Adult Literacy Grants support nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to adults in need of literacy assistance. Family Literacy Grants support family literacy service providers that combine parent and youth literacy instruction. Summer Reading Grants help nonprofit organizations, schools, and libraries with the implementation or expansion of summer reading programs for students who are new readers, below grade level readers, or readers with learning disabilities. Online applications for the three programs described above must be submitted by February 21, 2019. In addition, Youth Literacy Grants support nonprofit organizations, schools, and libraries that work to help students who are below grade level or experiencing difficulty reading. The application deadline for this program is May 16, 2019. Visit the Foundation’s website to access guidelines for each grant program.

EBSCO Information Services Solar Grant : (EBSCO) continues its commitment to helping libraries in their sustainability efforts with the 2019 EBSCO Solar grant program. As part of the EBSCO Solar initiative, EBSCO is soliciting grant applications to give libraries the opportunity to “go green” by funding solar installations. EBSCO will be accepting submissions from both domestic and international libraries.  For more information, click here.

CHNC New Content Support Program:  

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC. 

Libraries Making News:

Learning for Everyone:

CLiC Spring Workshops:

The CLiC Spring Workshops are just around the corner and registration is open now.   The dates and locations for 2019 are: Grand Junction: March 21 & 22 @ Colorado Mesa University Fort Morgan: March 29 @ Fort Morgan High SchoolPueblo: April 15 & 16 @ CSU-Pueblo

Library Creation and Learning Website:

Do you make use of the Library Creation and Learning website?  Well you should!  This site, developed by the Colorado State Library, is your portal to library continuing education opportunities and information.  At the site you will find:

  • Online courses
  • Training information and curriculum for both staff and the public
  • Library Makerspaces
  • Software and hardware information
  • Information about library customer service, intellectual freedom, privacy and confidentiality, and professional ethics.

Please contact Christine Kreger with any questions you may have or recommendations for content.  We would love to hear from you.

Whats New:

Garfield County Libraries – New Castle Branch:  Masquerade Suicide Awareness Rally

Grab a mask and join us at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 30 at the New Castle Branch Library of the Garfield County Libraries to bring light to the often stigmatized suicidal mind. The rally will include a poetry reading by Beth Walgren, who has been suicide free for almost 9 years. Free and open to all, with a suggested minimum age of 15. Masks provided at the event. For more information call 970-984-2346. https://www.gcpld.org/news-and-events/event/masquerade-suicide-awareness-rally

Vail Library:  This Year’s One Book One Valley Valley Selected Title . . . One Book One Valley is a collaborative effort designed to unite and uplift hundreds of citizens by encouraging reading and promoting a sense of community by sharing a common topic for conversation. This year’s selected title is “The Last of the Menu girls” by Denise Chavez. Join us! throughout January, February, March and April for book discussions, movies, author visits and round table discussions of this wonderful book! For more information, please contact us at libinfo@vailgov.com or 970-479-2187.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Book Club Hiatus:  The Colorado Book Club Resource, managed by us at CSL, will need to go on a brief hiatus from the end of January thru the first week of February.  Book club is run through the AspenCat Union Catalog, and the good folks at CLiC will be migrating the AspenCat service in early February.  That means that while that process is happening – we cannot change content online – no cataloging – no editing – and no circulation.  We will not accept any more loan requests after 10:00 pm January 31st, but all loans before that cut off time will be fulfilled.  Right now we do not know the exact date the service will be open again – but we will keep you posted through LibNet , CVL and of course – the Friday Grab Bag.  For more information, contact Madison Basch (basch_m@cde.state.co.us) – our Book Club Goddess. Thanks for your patience everyone, and get your book club requests in now.

Colorado Virtual Library Blog:

Plains to Peaks Collective Grows

The Colorado State Library and the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC) are excited to announce that our partners have recently shared new historic collections with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).  The PPC partners now offer 181,001 items for research and discovery through the DPLA.

With this second collection of items, the PPC welcomes new partners: American Alpine Club; University of Colorado, Art Museum; University of Wyoming, Art Museum; Mountain Scholar with collections from Colorado State University Libraries; University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Strauss Health Sciences Library and University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Kraemer Family Library.  Check out this link to see what is there.

Colorado State Publications Blog:

Library Related Employment:

Are you thinking of making a change this year in your job?  Check out Library Jobline for hot new library employment opportunities.

Have a great weekend everyone! This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Regan Harper, harper_r@cde.state.co.us.  Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Government Shutdown Resources

If you or a family member are affected by the recent government shutdown, the State of Colorado is stepping in to help. Furloughed workers are currently permitted to file for unemployment benefits. See Governor Polis’s press release for an overview, and visit the Colorado Department of Labor & Employment’s unemployment website for more details and to apply. Note that if federal workers do receive back pay after the shutdown ends, they are expected to reimburse the State for their unemployment benefits.

The Colorado Department of Education has added page on their website with education resources to help families during the shutdown. Here you can find links to food assistance and other benefits. You can also find information about assistance and benefits at the Colorado Department of Human Services website. See the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies website if you need information about making insurance payments during the shutdown.

Finally, Colorado 211, a human services referral agency, has a list of helpful resources on their site. Coloradans are welcome to contact 211 directly, via phone or online chat, for further assistance.

 

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Why are Colorado’s Deer Populations Declining?

According to Colorado Parks & Wildlife (CPW), the state’s current mule deer population of around 450,000 is about 25{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} below their objective. Populations have been declining over the last several decades due to human population growth resulting in habitat loss and vehicle collisions, as well as other factors like climate change, malnutrition, diseases like chronic wasting disease, and predation. A recent technical report from CPW examines the causes of deer mortality, specifically to help wildlife investigators determine the difference between predation and scavenging so that accurate causes of death can be determined and addressed. Since 2016 CPW has been studying whether predator control can help boost mule deer populations. You can read more about this strategy on CPW’s website.

CPW has also recently released The Story of Colorado’s Mule Deer, a short publication for general readers that explores the history of mule deer in Colorado and some of the factors behind the recent population decline. Additional information can be found in Mule Deer in Northwest Colorado, a fact sheet from CPW summarizing their research in that part of the state.

Colorado is not the only western state to experience declining mule deer populations. In 2004 CPW (then the Colorado Division of Wildlife) teamed with other western U.S. wildlife agencies to produce the North American Mule Deer Conservation Plan, which examines a variety of population decline factors including hunting, disease, and habitat loss. A few years prior, the Division of Wildlife also submitted a report to the Colorado legislature on declining mule deer populations. Our library collection includes numerous other resources on Colorado mule deer research; search our library’s online catalog for titles.

 

Photo by David Hannigan courtesy Colorado Parks & Wildlife

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The Colorado State Museum

Credit: Denver Public Library Western History & Genealogy Department

Have you lived in Colorado long enough to remember when the State Museum was located at 14th and Sherman, in what is now the Legislative Services Building?

The State Historical Society was established in 1879 and its earliest museum exhibits were located in the State Capitol. By the early 1900s, however, the Society wanted its own home. Architect Frank Edbrooke — who had completed the designs for the Capitol — was hired to design a new structure, which would be located across the street. Built of native Colorado materials including Yule marble and Cotopaxi granite, the three-story Classical Revival-style building was completed in 1915. The museum was best known for its impressive archaeological collections and early Native American artifacts. Later, in the 1930s, WPA activities resulted in a great deal of historical research as well as the creation of the dioramas that became one of the museum’s most memorable features. In fact, the amazingly detailed WPA diorama depicting 1860 Denver can still be viewed at today’s History Colorado Center.

You can learn about the old museum building in Colorado Capitol Buildings, a 1951 publication highlighting the State Capitol and its associated architecture. In addition, a 1972 museum brochure digitized by our library might bring back memories, with photos and descriptions of the exhibits.

The State Museum continued at 14th and Sherman until 1976, when it moved to a new home at 1300 Broadway. That second building was torn down in 2010 and the current building, at 12th and Broadway, opened in 2012. The old museum building became legislative offices, due to its proximity to the Capitol, and is a part of the Denver Civic Center National Historic Landmark District.

The Colorado State Museum under construction, circa 1915. Credit: Denver Public Library Western History & Genealogy Department.