Categories
Plains to Peaks Collective

New Colorado and Wyoming Collections Join the DPLA

The Plains to Peaks Collective – a partnership of the Colorado State Library and the Wyoming State Library – is excited to announce that our partners have recently shared new historic collections with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).  The DPLA allows one-stop-searching of many of the rich cultural heritage items found in the United States. The PPC partners, including institutions from Colorado and Wyoming, now offer 181,000 items for research and discovery.

With this second collection of items, the PPC has welcomed new partners the American Alpine Club; the University of Colorado, Art Museum; the University of Wyoming, Art Museum and Mountain Scholar with collections from Colorado State University Libraries; University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Strauss Health Sciences Library and University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Kraemer Family Library.

A few highlights from our new partners include:

Photograph, Approaching Helen Glacier. American Alpine Club

The Albert R. Ellingwood Collection, American Alpine Club

Albert R. Ellingwood is one of the most notable figures in the early development of western mountaineering.  While on a Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford in the early 20th Century, Ellingwood traveled often to the Austrian and Swiss Alps, learning European climbing techniques from Swiss guides.  He brought that knowledge with him when he returned to the Rocky Mountain region. In 1916 he was the first person to climb the last remaining unclimbed fourteeners; Crestone Peak, Crestone Needle, and Kit Carson. During his time, Ellingwood was one of three men to climb all of the officially named 14,000-ft. peaks in Colorado.  A noted scholar and author, during his career,  he served as a professor of Political Science at Colorado College, Northwestern University, University of Illinois and the University of Southern California.

The American Alpine Club’s Albert R. Ellingwood Collection includes photographs of Ellingwood’s climbs in Colorado and Wyoming in 1920 and 1924.  Ellingwood was often accompanied by other pioneer climbers Carl Blaurock and Herman and Elmina Buhl.

Warren and Genevieve Garst Collection, Colorado State University, Libraries (Mountain Scholar)

Photograph, Warren Garst. Colorado State University. Libraries

Warren, a wildlife cinematographer, and Genny, a computer programmer, started their married life together in 1958.  Shortly after, Genny accepted a position teaching computer programming at then Colorado A & M in Fort Collins while Warren completed a master’s degree in zoology, while at the same time continuing to film wildlife and eventually accepting a filming job with Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom.

For 25 years, from 1962 until 1987, Warren and Genny Garst spent at least nine months a year on the road shooting film footage. In his role as photographer Warren created over 20,000 images of animals, people, and places across all seven continents. The University’s collection contains correspondence between Warren and Genny, research materials, Warren’s writings including drafts and index cards for his zoology dictionary Zoolexicon, their photographic slide collection and oral histories.

University of Wyoming Art Museum

The University of Wyoming Art Museum’s permanent collection includes objects of American art, European art, photography, contemporary art, and ethnographic art.  The collections shared with the DPLA comprise items from their ethnographic art collection including a collection of 20th century sculptures, tools and other miscellaneous carvings from Easter Island. The Art Museum also has several special collections including the Huey G. and Phyllis T. Shelton Collection, which is comprised entirely of the work of Ichiro, the largest single-artist netsuke collection in the U.S. These first items shared with the DPLA are just a small sample of the Art Museum’s rich collection of 8,000 objects which they plan to share more of in the future.

Sculpture, Sarumawashi, Monkey Trainer. Ichiro. University of Wyoming Art Museum
Sculpture, Birdman. Easter Island. University of Wyoming Art Museum

CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder

Lithograph, title unknown. Michel Fingesten. CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder

The CU Art Museum’s growing collection of more than 8,700 objects represents the wide range of materials used in the creation of Ancient & Classical art, art of the Americas, Asian art, European art, and Modern and Contemporary art. The over 500 objects shared include items from the Michel Fingesten Collection.  Fingesten became one of the most prolific graphic artists and bookplate designers of the 20th Century. He died in 1943, shortly after being liberated from the Fascist internment camp of Ferramonti-Tarsia near Cosenza, Calabria. The University, with funding provided by the Program in Jewish Studies, acquired a large collection of Fingesten’s work in 2011.

Returning Partners

The returning PPC partners have continued to share items from their vast collections.  A few highlights from these collections include:

Diaries of a Wyoming teacher, homesteader, and superintendent of public instruction, Edith K.O. Clark, from the University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center.

The Denver Public Library is now sharing over 93,000 items, including this photograph, D&RGW train with engine 552, engine type EMD FT, from the Colorado Railroad Museum Collection.  This is just one of the 413 Colorado Railroad Museum photographs now shared with the DPLA.

Returning partner the Salida Public Library has partnered with the Salida Museum Association to share 127 images from the museum’s collection including this image of the Salida Hot Springs Pool constructed by a 1937 Federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) project.

Please join us in welcoming these new partners and new collections to the DPLA. If you are looking for new stories to discover please check back often as we will be adding new items four times a year; April, July, October and January. If you would like to share your institution’s collections with the DPLA or have questions about participation please contact me, Leigh Jeremias, ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org or visit the Plains to Peaks Collective website.

 

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

CHNC Welcomes the Westminster Journal with help of SIPA & New Content Support Program!

Front Page of Westminster Journal (Vol. 1, No. 1)

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection is proud to welcome Westminster’s first local news publication, The Westminster Journal, to our online catalog in our continued effort to expand access to Colorado’s rich newspaper history! Thanks to the Westminster Public Library, CHNC users can now browse over 850 issues of the Westminster Journal, ranging from its first publication in 1947 to 1964.

The Journal was founded by A.B. Withers, who was also publishing the Wheat Ridge Journal and the Edgewater Tribune at the time. Withers maintained the Westminster Journal and grew its readership until 1954, during which time he was responsible for the hire of some of Colorado most famous journalists, including Jack Bacon, who won the Colorado Press Association Newspaper Person of the Year in 1994. After Withers sold the paper, it changed hands several more times over the next nearly 20 years until Community Publications assumed its management and changed the name to the Journal-Sentinel.  However, the Westminster Journal saw this sleepy Denver satellite grow into a thriving central Colorado metropolis during a very exciting time in the Centennial State.

Readers can browse the journal to read about the first graduating class of the United States Air Force Academy, learn how the construction of I-25 changed the landscape and culture of the Front Range, or bask in the glow of the Denver Broncos victory over the Boston Patriots in the very first game of the newly re-established 1960 American Football League. Whatever your interest, the CHNC and our new partner, the Westminster Public Library, have you covered with help, in part by the Colorado Statewide Internet Portal Authority (SIPA) micro grant program and the CHNC New Content Support Program.

Both funding sources offer assistance to educational institutions expanding access to online resources.  And great news, the CHNC New Content Support Program for 2019 is officially underway and taking applications now. Learn more about how your Colorado community’s news publication can join the CHNC and reach audiences all over the world at http://bit.ly/chncnewcontentsupport and check out all of our great titles at coloradohistoricnewspapers.org!

Categories
Digital Colorado

CLIR: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Grant Available.

Council on Library and Information Resources: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives

Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives, a program of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), is intended to help digitize and provide access to collections of rare or unique content in cultural heritage institutions. The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution. Collections proposed for digitization may be in any format or relevant to any subject. Grants, ranging from a minimum of $50,000 to a maximum of $250,000 in the case of a single-institution project or $500,000 for a collaborative project, will be provided to colleges and universities, research centers, museums, libraries, historical societies, cultural associations, and select government units. Online initial proposals must be submitted by April 3, 2019; final proposals are due September 17, 2019. Visit the CLIR website to review the program guidelines and application process.

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Topics in History: The Lake County War

(Photo from leadville.com)

The Lake County War, as it has become known, was not actually a war at all in the traditional sense.  Instead, it is the term used to describe the time period in what was once Lake County (now Chaffee County) from 1874-1881, during which law and order broke down and vigilante “justice” reigned. For nearly a century, details of the events of this time were based on scattered and varying accounts, questionable witness testimony, and even local legend. In recent decades, however, historians have gathered information from local news sources, court records, and family histories in order to piece together the events of this tumultuous time in Colorado’s Arkansas River Valley.

In the early morning hours of June 17, 1874, Lake County homesteader, George Harrington raced from his home to a nearby outbuilding that was engulfed in flames. As Harrington and his wife attempted to extinguish the fire, which had been started deliberately, shots rang out and he was struck in the back and killed on the spot. Friends of Harrington were convinced that he was murdered by a fellow Lake Countian named Elijah Gibbs, with whom Harrington had recently quarreled over rights to an irrigation ditch. When Gibbs was acquitted of the murder in a Denver court, the late Harrington’s friends and supporters took matters into their own hands.

On the night of January 22, 1875, a posse of approximately 15 men surrounded Gibbs’s cabin and demanded he come out to be lynched. When Gibbs refused, the group threatened to set fire to the home with Gibbs’s family inside. As the group prepared to storm the cabin, Gibbs opened fire, hitting two of the men and causing one to accidentally fire on his own group, leaving all three dead. The posse left and Gibbs and his family fled the area. However, Harrington’s supporters were determined to get justice. The posse reformed with greater numbers and called themselves “The Committee of Safety.”

Over the following months, The Committee of Safety rounded up many of Gibbs’s alleged supporters, sympathizers, and fellow cattle rustlers. Many were tortured, while others were lynched. The committee’s tactics for “trying” a defendant included questioning the accused with a noose around their neck and tightening it with each answer the committee disliked. The group is even believed to have been responsible for the shooting death of Judge Elias Dyer, son of the famed circuit-rider Father John Dyer, after he issued warrants of arrest for 28 members of the Committee of Safety. The violence continued to a point that the Governor of Colorado sent a special detective to the area to investigate the conflict and report back.  However, the agent never uncovered anything of substance and the violence continued for the next several years, causing many families to flee the area in fear for their safety.

As time went on, the fervor of the committee members waned and the violence eventually subsided. The last of the Lake County War deaths is believed to have taken place in 1881, but estimates of the total death toll range anywhere from 10 to 100 over the course of the conflict. Among those lives allegedly claimed by the Lake County War were two brothers from the Boone family, distant relatives of the same Boone family that explored the Missouri Territory. Though many details of the Lake County War have been lost to time, a renewed effort by historians has uncovered new information regarding the motives and power dynamics of its key players.  One thing that remains certain though, is that the Lake County War was evidence of a Colorado that was still very much the Wild West.

 

Historic Newspaper Articles About The Lake County War

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

New Year, New Newspaper Support Program

CHNC New Content Support Program

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.  We want to help local communities include their historic stories to the larger Colorado digital newspaper footprint.

About CHNC

A service of the Colorado State Library, the CHNC currently includes more than 1.2 million digitized pages, representing more than 250 individual newspaper titles published in Colorado primarily from 1859 through 1923. Due to copyright restrictions, the CHNC does not always include newspapers published after 1923, but the CHNC can digitize beyond 1923 if publisher permission can be secured by our partners.

On-going support for maintaining, developing, and providing access to the CHNC is paid for with state and federal funds administered by the Colorado State Library. We continue to add new pages to the CHNC when community funding is located to pay the costs of digitization.

Awards

Program funding will be awarded for the digitization of newspapers on microfilm or in original format; the processing of digital files including segmentation of pages into articles, advertisements and illustrations; the creation of metadata; OCR transcription of newspaper text and inclusion in the CHNC online database.  Support awards can only be used to offset the cost of digitizing newspaper pages for inclusion in the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection, and will be applied by the Colorado State Library to support the actual digitization process through their chosen vendor partners.

In Spring of 2019, CHNC will award $15,000 in support for newspaper digitization projects. Institutions can apply for a maximum of $3,000 of support funding and a minimum of $1,500 towards the digitization of newspapers for inclusion in the CHNC. All support awards require a 25{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} cash match.  The cash match needs to be provided to CHNC by June 30, 2019. The amount of funding requested by applicants will determine how many projects will be funded.

Who Can Apply

We strongly encourage institutions that are not currently CHNC partners to apply.  Special consideration will be given to newspaper content that is underrepresented in CHNC such as geographic areas, ethnic groups, social movements and non standard content types such as company newsletters.

Private individuals wishing to apply for support funding should be partnered with a local cultural heritage organization such as a library, archives, museum, friends group or association.  Single individuals without affiliation will not be considered.

Application Process

Complete all questions on the application form, found here.  Incomplete applications will not be considered.  Applications received on or before February 28, 2019 will be considered.

Successful projects will be selected by the Program Committee.  Projects will be evaluated on the historical significance of proposed newspaper title, support of content areas that are currently underrepresented in CHNC and plans for community engagement.  Special consideration will be given to institutions that are not currently CHNC partners.

Application Rubric

Total available points = 50 pts

  • Completed form = 5 Pts
  • Historical significance of title(s) = 1 – 10 pts
  • Support of Content Areas not currently represented = 1 – 10 pts
  • New title to CHNC = 5pts
  • New Partner to CHNC = 10 pts
  • Plans for ongoing community engagement and promotion = 1-10 pts

Project Period or Timeline

The project time period is from April 1, 2019 to December 30, 2019.  Any digitization work needs to be in process by December 15, 2019.

Deadline

Completed applications must be received on or before February 28, 2019.

Awards

Awardees will be notified by March 15, 2019.

Questions and Additional Considerations

The program does not cover indirect costs and cannot be used for any purpose other than the digitization of newspaper content to be added to CHNC.  If you have questions about the support program, the application process, or about newspapers available for digitization or if you would like a cost estimate please contact Leigh Jeremias, ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.  If you are considering applying to support a newspaper title that may be in copyright (issues published after 1923) please contact Leigh prior to the application submission so copyright holder permissions can be discussed.

 

Categories
Digital Colorado

SIPA is Here to Help

The SIPA (Statewide Internet Portal Authority) recently opened applications for its 2019 Micro-Grant program.   The program is designed for state and local governments, special districts and public education in Colorado to put more information and services online.  Grant funding is available for hardware, professional services, innovation, digitization
project planning and broadband.  Example projects include, digitization and online access of historical collections, school programming, information kiosks and interactive mapping. 

Mark you calendar for SIPA’s 2018-19 grant application timeline:

  • November 30, 2018: Grant applications open
  • January 18, 2019: Grant applications due by 5pm MST
  • January 19 – March 1, 2019: SIPA review period
  • March 4– 8, 2019: SIPA will announce the 2019 grant awardees
  • April 16, 2019: Awards are given at the annual SIPA User Conference and Grant Ceremony

If you have questions about the grant application process please refer to SIPA’s frequently Asked Questions page or email sipa@cosipa.gov.  I am also happy to offer advice on proposed historic collection projects.  You are welcomed to contact me at ljeremias@coloradovituallibrary.org.

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Colorado’s Cultural Newspaper History

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection has once again grown by thousands of pages thanks to some very special new additions! We at the CHNC are proud to welcome more than 10 new foreign language titles to our online catalogue as we constantly strive to grow our knowledge of Colorado’s rich, cultural history.  Whether it’s reading the local news in Italian, catching up on politics in Serbian, or browsing the classifieds in Spanish, CHNC visitors now have an even more direct line to Colorado’s cultural past through the voices of those who lived it with these great, new titles:

Spanish

Title: La Hermandad
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1889-1907
Issues Available on CHNC: 123

Title: El Progreso
County: Las Animas
Years of Publication: 1888-1944
Issues Available on CHNC: 1

 

Italian

Title: L’Unione
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1897-1947
Issues Available on CHNC: 299

Title: Il Risveglio
County: Denver
Years of Publication: 1905-1956
Issues Available on CHNC: 79

Title: Il CO-Operatore
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1918-1919
Issues Available on CHNC: 6

Title: Marsica Nuova
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1918-1926
Issues Available on CHNC: 113

Title: Corriere di Trinidad
County: Las Animas
Years of Publication: 1903-1944
Issues Available on CHNC: 2

 

Slavic

Title: Glas Svobode
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1902-1904
Issues Available on CHNC: 5

Title: Mir
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1901-1902
Issues Available on CHNC: 13

 

Serbian

Title: Srpski Odjek
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1902-1903
Issues Available on CHNC: 13

Title: Srbin
County: Pueblo
Years of Publication: 1909-1911
Issues Available on CHNC: 1

 

So whether you’re searching for your ancestors, researching a cultural project, or just practicing your Italian, stop by ColoradoHistoricNewspapers.org and dive into Colorado’s rich and diverse history. And be sure to visit again and again as we’re adding new titles and issues all the time!

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Topics in History: Colorado’s Homegrown History

As Thanksgiving approaches, there’s a chance you may be swapping recipes with friends, recreating an old family dish, or doing some googling for fresh ideas. Luckily for us Coloradans, our Rocky Mountain home has more than a few favorite foods that are as uniquely intertwined with our history as they are with our daily diets. Whether they’re from the sunny orchards of the western slope, the spicy southern Colorado border towns, or the eastern plains, Coloradans have always had a special love for their local fare.  These are some of our favorites that are ripe with flavor and Colorado history!

Palisade Peaches

The region that would one day become the town of Palisade was originally inhabited by the Ute tribe of Native Americans.  Settlers began to arrive in the area in the early 1880’s and named it for the palisade cliff formations to the North. Some of the first peach trees in the area were planted by John Harlow in 1882 and by the early 1900’s, new irrigation systems allowed for more than 25,000 pounds of peaches to be shipped daily from Palisade to destinations all around the region. The rich soil and nearly 200-day growing season of the Western Slope produces apples, cherries, and even impressive wine grapes, but are first and foremost responsible for these peaches, which are now some of the most sought after nation-wide. In fact, because the town owed so much to its peaches, in 1968, the town of Palisade began hosting an annual Peach Festival in August that now draws over 15,000 visitors to the town. In Colorado, Palisade peaches are used in everything from jam to barbeque sauce to Colorado whiskey and we could not be more proud!

Rocky Ford Melons

The town of Rocky Ford was named for a nearby shallow crossing of the Arkansas River by explorer Kit Carson, founded by G.W Swink and Asa Russell in 1871, and moved shortly thereafter following the placement of railroad tracks. By 1881, Swink had gardens so large that they were producing nearly 300 tons of watermelon a year and in 1886, he began to grow the Netted Gem Cantaloupe, the melon for which Rocky Ford is now most well-known. And just like Palisade’s famous peaches, Rocky Ford’s melons have their own festival that centers around Watermelon Day, which was founded by Swink himself in 1878 with about 25 friends and neighbors. Today Watermelon Day is the centerpiece of the Arkansas Valley Fair and boasts over 12,000 attendees and hosts events ranging from seed-spitting contests to watermelon carving competitions. It is also estimated that nearly 50,000 pounds of free watermelons are given away on that day at Rocky Ford’s famous Watermelon Pile. Also, the Rocky Ford cantaloupe don’t just grow bigger and healthier than other region’s melons. They actually contain up 5{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} more natural sugar, making them richer and sweeter than others and proving that Colorado sun and soil really do make all the difference!

Colorado Green Chile (Pueblo Chilies)

Even though we saved it for last, if you ask anyone Coloradan what food we love most, our green chile is #1. Unlike our peaches and melons, the Pueblo Chilies that provide the base for our favorite dish are a fairly recent discovery. While chilies are no strangers to Southern Colorado, the particular variety that has become the commonly known Pueblo Green Chile of today was actually the result of a mutation in the crop of farmer name Harry Mosco.  After his passing in 1988, Mosco left a bag of seeds to his nephew, Dr. Mike Bartolo, the manager and vegetable crop specialist at Colorado State University’s Arkansas Valley Research Center.  Bartolo found that the peppers these seeds produced tended to be a little bigger, a little thicker and faced upward toward the sun while growing, as opposed to hanging down like most chilies.  Today, these Mosco chilies are the most common variety of Pueblo Chile found in Colorado and as you may have guessed, they too have their own festival. The Pueblo Chile and Frijoles Festival takes place in September and attracts over 140,000 attendees over 3 days. But Coloradans don’t need a festival to celebrate their favorite dish all year long.  From Burgers to biscuits to pasta and even pizza, our Colorado hearts pump green and spicy!

 

Historic Newspaper Articles/Ads About Palisade Peaches

Palisade Tribune, Volume 39, Number 7, August 15, 1941

Palisade Tribune, Volume 10, Number 7, July 12, 1912

Palisade Tribune, Volume 4, Number 13, August 25, 1906

Historic Newspaper Articles/Ads About Rocky Ford Melons

La Junta Tribune, Volume 21, Number 41, August 15, 1900

Middle Park Times, July 12, 1912

Aspen Daily Times, August 25, 1908

Historic Newspaper Articles/Ads About Colorado Green Chile

La Cucaracha, Volume II, Number 10, November 7, 1977

Louisville Times, Volume 64, Number 5, July 21, 1977

Categories
Boom Years

Otto Mears: Pathfinder of the San Juans

When: 1840 – 1931

Where: Born in Russia and came to America at the age of 11.

Why Important: Built 450 miles of toll roads that later became most of the modern roads in southwestern Colorado.  He also built three railroads in the San Juan Mountains that helped develop the area’s mining wealth.

Biography

Otto Mears was born in Estonia, which was part of Russia in 1840.  He was orphaned at an early age and was eventually sent to live with relatives in San Francisco, California when he was 11. Mears worked very hard from the time he arrived in America until he joined the California Volunteer infantry during the Civil War. In 1864, Mears travelled to Santa Fe for a short time before moving to the Saguache, CO where he opened a general store and married Mary Kampfshulte in 1870. That business eventually grew to include hardware stores in several towns in southwestern Colorado.

Travel in Colorado was still very difficult at that time and Mears needed to find ways to move his goods around the region, so in 1870 he began building toll roads with the Poncha Pass Wagon Road.  He went on to build more than a dozen toll roads covering more than 450 miles.  Among these was the famous Million Dollar Highway between Ouray and Silverton, and by 1883 no one could get in or out of the City of Ouray without traveling over a Mears toll road.

In 1887 Mears built the Silverton Railroad to tap the silver mines on Red Mountain Pass between Silverton and Ouray. Because he was responsible for the railroad, Mears was able to issue passes to his friends, family, and colleagues for unlimited travel on his rail lines. He printed these special passes first on paper, then on leather, and eventually created them out of engraved silver and gold. Today, these passes are very rare and valuable. Mears later built four more railroads, including the famed the Rio Grande Southern Railroad from Ridgway and Durango.

Mears wasn’t just a successful businessman. He was also very active in politics and involved in many of the treaty negotiations between the Ute Indians and the US Government. He spoke the Ute language and was a friend of Chief Ouray. Mears was also chosen as one of Colorado’s three presidential electors in 1876 and was elected to the Colorado Legislature in the 1880’s. Despite Mears’ many successes in Colorado however, the Silver Panic of 1893 hit his businesses hard, causing him to lose control of many of his Colorado enterprises.  In 1896 he moved to the east coast where he built the Chesapeake Bay Railroad, served as President of the Mack Truck Company, and built a railroad in Louisiana.

Mears returned to Colorado in 1906 and purchased a house in Silverton.  He continued to invest in mining activities and regained much of the fortune he had lost in the 1890s.  Otto retired to Pasadena, California in 1920 where he and Mary lived in the Maryland Hotel until Mary died in 1924 and Otto on June 24, 1931.

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

DU’s Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus Student Newspapers Join the CHNC!

As our list of university newspapers continues to grow, the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection is pleased to welcome some very special additions to our online catalog. The Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus, the University of Denver’s first and second (respectively) student newspapers are now available at ColoradoHistoricNewspapers.org and they are even more unique and interesting than we could have hoped! While they both offer a glimpse into the life of DU students at the close of the 19th Century,each paper has a voice and a style that makes it truly one of a kind.                                

The Weekly Peanut was first created in 1882, just 20 years after the University’s founding, by students George Manly and Clark Winsor.  While the Weekly Peanut perfectly captured the silliness and sarcasm common to college students of any era, the paper was quite unique in one very obvious way: all articles and illustrations were done by hand. Readers can now take in the detailed account of one student’s vacation to Santa Fe in his own elegant script or read the description of a student’s prank on his professor in his rough, but personalized hand. But don’t worry about deciphering any Victorian cursive, we’ve transcribed each issue, so you won’t miss a word! And while you might visit for the stories, you’ll stay for the illustrations. The Weekly Peanut illustrators didn’t pull any punches in their depictions of fellow students, school facilities, and even professors. Even though it only produced four issues (of which we have three), the Weekly Peanut is truly one of the gems of our CHNC catalog.

Though it began only four years after the final issue of the Weekly Peanut, DU’s second student newspaper, The Hesperus, depicts an image of student life that could not be more different. Issues of The Hesperus feature lofty poetry, profiles of important political and cultural figures, and meditations on morality that remind readers that, at that particular point in time, the University of Denver was still very much a Seminary College. Even so, The Hesperus depicts a distinctly progressive college atmosphere in which co-education of the sexes and outspoken political engagement were expected and encouraged. The Hesperus ran for 12 years before competition from the Clarion, DU’s student paper still in print today, shut down its presses, but its mark on the University’s history remains.

The Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus, though vastly different in their style and concept of “news,” together give readers a fuller understanding of what life was like for university students in Denver at the end of the 19th Century.  Whether it is a less than flattering sketch of an unpopular professor or in-depth look at a deeply biblical lecture, both the Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus are invaluable pieces of Colorado History.  Come check out both papers at ColoradoHistoricNewspapers.org for yourself and make sure to check back often, as we’re adding new issues and titles all the time!

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Topics in History: The Coffee Myth and the Power of Advertising

In today’s health obsessed culture of fit watches and online trainers, it seems that most Americans should have a pretty solid grasp on what is and is not good for them. However, with the constant inundation of “new studies” and “fitness breakthroughs,” it can be tough to tell what is really new information and what is actually just clever marketing. Any kid who ever reached for their parent’s steaming mug as a child or tossed back an espresso or two for a term paper all-nighter may have heard the familiar scolding, “Kids shouldn’t drink coffee. It will stunt your growth.” Whether that seemed like a fair trade at the time or kept you off coffee for life, you may be shocked to learn that this potential “health risk” was actually the advertising creation of the Post Cereal Company (now Post Consumer Brands, LLC) in the early 20th century.

Before he started stuffing children full of incredibly healthy favorites like Fruity Pebbles and Waffle Crisp, cereal tycoon C.W. Post first developed a “cereal-based, caffeine-free coffee substitute” called Postum. While the product did not contain any caffeine, tasted nothing like coffee, and only vaguely resembled the brownish morning beverage, it was marketed as a healthy alternative for the old, the young, or anyone afflicted by the “dangerous” side effects of coffee. Unfortunately, there wasn’t any concrete, scientific evidence to support the claims that coffee was unhealthy, other than occasional jitters or nervousness it could cause when consumed in excess. Fortunately for Post, their advertising didn’t need evidence; just a strong campaign with a story that was just believable enough to scare up some customers.

Post began running newspaper ads that read like a doctor’s interview, listing symptoms (some real and some imagined) that immediately ceased when the afflicted switched from coffee to healthier Postum. Furthermore, the ads claimed that coffee was often consumed as a replacement for milk as a morning beverage, leaving the drinker without their daily requirement of calcium. This lack of calcium, they claimed, was responsible for everything from dyspepsia to weakness to, you guessed it, stunted growth. Postum’s ads implored readers to switch from coffee themselves and to protect their children from the dangers of malnourishment and impeded development caused by coffee. In doing so, Post managed to pilfer one generation of consumers and secure the next in one fell swoop.

With the story of coffee’s danger to children firmly in place, the Post Cereal Company established itself as a nationwide corporation. When the U.S. joined World War II, Postum enjoyed even more success as coffee was rationed in the States. Not only was Postum now the healthy choice, but it was the moral and economic choice in a time when coffee was needed to energize the troops overseas.  Though Postum enjoyed a long and profitable popularity in the U.S., the coffee renaissance of the 1990’s firmly re-established coffee as both a luxury and a necessity, leaving its substitute unable to compete.  Post Consumer Brands, LLC discontinued Postum in 2007, but the effects of its once genius marketing campaign have not been forgotten. The question of coffee stunting growth is still a popular one on online health, lifestyle, and coffee forums alike, and while there has never been any concrete evidence to support this claim, many parents and young people alike still stick to the “better safe than sorry” philosophy when it comes to coffee.

“Sponsored Articles” About the Dangers of Coffee

Categories
Touring Colorado's Collections

Touring Colorado’s Collections: Historical Publications from the State of Colorado

 

You may not realize that one of the State Library’s own divisions is a treasure trove of historical information on Colorado. The State Publications Library was founded in 1980 to ensure the accessibility of all state government publications in perpetuity. The library’s collection includes publications from every state agency, dating from Territorial days to the present. In recent years the library has been engaged in digitizing many of its historical print documents, so that a wide variety of resources on Colorado history are now accessible to anyone. These documents can be explored in the library’s digital repository and many are now also available in the Digital Public Library of America.

What are some of the things you can find in the State Publications Library’s digital collection? Our collection contains state-issued reports on a variety of topics such as agriculture, education, elections, health, natural resources, taxes, etc. We have publications from the Legislature and from the state Supreme Court. And so much more.

One of our most frequently-accessed publications is the Biennial Report of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the state’s old name for the Department of Education. This serial, dating from 1870 to 1964, provides updates and information on the state’s public schools and districts. Anyone researching Colorado schools should be sure to view these reports. We also have Course of Study books that outline the curricula used in Colorado schools in the early 1900s.

The library also has digitized a number of past governors’ speeches. One of the most interesting is from 1905. During the previous November election, the two candidates for governor, Alva Adams and James Peabody, were both accused of obtaining fraudulent votes, so the governorship went to Lt. Governor Jesse McDonald in what became known as Colorado’s “three governors in a day” scandal. The speeches of Peabody and Adams provide fascinating first-person accounts of the controversy.

In Colorado’s early days, mining was a major part of the Colorado economy. We have hundreds of mining and geology reports from the early 1900s available online, including reports of the state coal mine inspector, which detail some of the hazardous working conditions the miners experienced. A report of the special investigation into the Ludlow Massacre in 1914 is also available.

Another popular topic is Colorado’s amazing wildlife. Included in the library’s digital collection is everything from birdwatching guides to publications that teach kids about wildlife. Arthur Carhart’s Report of Sage Grouse Survey from 1941 is one of our early wildlife publications.

The library also has thousands of research publications from state colleges and universities, especially Colorado State University and the University of Colorado at Boulder, available online. We also have digitized publications from the State Historical Society, such as this 1972 brochure about the old state museum, as well as one of our most popular items, Baker and Hafen’s 1927 five-volume History of Colorado.

The documents listed here are but a very small sample of the thousands of digital publications available from the State Publications Library. While the library has been digitizing historical publications, those documents that are “born digital” today are also being added to our repository, ensuring that the current information that is tomorrow’s “history” will be available online for generations to come.

Old highway maps, like this one from 1942, are available online from the State Publications Library.

Categories
Touring Colorado's Collections

Touring Colorado’s Collections: Greetings from Southwest Colorado!

Courtesy Fort Lewis College

Today quick messages and family updates are sent by text message, Facebook, Instagram or other social media posts.  But before social media and cell phones, postcards were the most popular way for friends and family to quickly and easily communicate with each other.  Even though postcards are not as widely used as they were during the “Golden Age of Postcards”, between 1907 and 1915, collecting them or deltiology, is still a popular hobby.

Greetings from Durango, Colorado. Courtesy Fort Lewis College

One avid collector, as well as philanthropist and overall promoter of southwest Colorado history, Nina Heald Webber, donated her postcard collection to the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College in Durango starting in 2002.  The Webber collection is vast containing about 4,500 postcards separated into six volumes and organized by place and subject: Early Durango, Later Durango and Local Narrow Gauge Railroads, Mesa Verde – Aztec Ruins, Silverton & Animas Canyon, Telluride – Ouray – Ophir, and Other Southwest Colorado Areas. The collection offers a tourist perspective of the Southwest region as well as documents how the region’s industries, towns and natural landscapes have changed over time.

The Webber collection includes postcards from the 1890’s to the 1950’s allowing researchers to also learn about the history and evolution of postcard production.  Postcard highlights from the collection include the White Border Period from 1915 to 1930,  the Photochrom Period from 1945 to present and numerous real photo postcards. A personal favorite, leather postcards, produced between roughly 1903 and 1910, are also found in the collection. Leather postcards were banned by the U.S. post office in 1907 because they jammed postage-canceling machines.

Leather Postcard. Greetings from Ouray, Colorado. Courtesy Fort Lewis College.

Real photo postcard. The Galloping Goose – Unique Train on the Rio Grande Southern in Southwestern CO. Courtesy Fort Lewis College.

The collection is available to view in person at the archive of the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College. The Center and Webber have dedicated time and resources to digitizing the collection and making it available online. The collection can be easily browsed through the Fort Lewis digital archive collection.  Fort Lewis recently shared a portion of their digital collection with the Plains to Peaks Collective, making these items discoverable through the Digital Public Library of America, a national platform for digitized historic collections. Thank you to Webber and to the Center for sharing this important Colorado history!

If you would like to share your unique historic digital collections with the DPLA, please contact Leigh Jeremias at ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org or 720-483-4261.  We are currently gathering information about all institutions that would like to participate in the future so please reach out.  Information about the PPC can be found at: http://ppc.cvlsites.org/

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

CHNC News: Holy Cross Trail

For many Coloradans, climbing a fourteener is a rite of passage.  There are 53 fourteeners in Colorado but only one had a newspaper named after it.  CHNC partner, the Eagle Valley Library District, recently added 913 issues of the Holy Cross Trail, from 1924 to 1941. The Red Cliff paper, published by O. W. Daggett was a source of Red Cliff and Minturn news but also promoted Daggett’s other endeavors or crusades.

This included his devotion to the Mount of the Holy Cross, a Colorado fourteener at 14,005 ft, that was named for the distinctive cross-shaped snowfield on its northeast face. It grew in fame after 1873 when renowned photographer William Henry Jackson climbed the adjacent Notch Mountain and took the first of many photographs of the distinctive cross .  Over the next few decades the Mount of Holy Cross continued to grow in fame as a Christian symbol.

William Henry Jackson. Mount of the Holy Cross, in the Clouds, 1890-1910. Courtesy History Colorado, 86.200.425

Courtesy, Holy Cross Trail

As a result in 1921 the Holy Cross Association, of which Daggett served as publicity manager, was established for the purpose of developing the Holy Cross “Shrine” for religious, educational and recreational purposes.  In the mid-1920’s Dr. O.W. Randall, a dentist from Eagle, and John P. Carrigan, a Catholic priest from Glenwood Springs, conceived of the pilgrimages and worship services to the Shrine.

 

Services at Mt. of the Holy Cross, 1929-1933. Courtesy Eagle County Historical Society

Daggett’s Holy Cross crusade also had the backing of Denver Post publisher Frederick Bonfils who repeatedly promoted the pilgrimages in the Post. The pilgrimages began to attract thousands of people from all over the world. With this increased popularity, the Mount and the surrounding area received National Monument status on May 11, 1929.  Over the next few years the Forest Service and Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), who camped on O. W. Randall’s property, made area improvements including new trails, a pilgrim base camp, the Tigiwon Community House, and a viewing shelter, the Notch Mountain Shelter.

CCC camp on Randall’s ranch, 1930-1934. Courtesy Eagle County Historical Society

The height of visitation was in 1934 when about 3,000 pilgrimages were made to Holy Cross National Monument. Visitation began to steadily decrease and in 1950 its national monument status was revoked. Daggett sold the paper in 1940 and the new owner discontinued it shortly after.  Regardless, today hikers still continue to check the Mount of the Holy Cross off their list of climbed fourteeners and pilgrimages are still made to Notch Mountain viewing site.  Researchers and history buffs can learn more about these historic pilgrimages and Daggett’s other crusades by browsing this exciting new addition to CHNC.

Thank you Eagle Valley Library District for continuing to add historic newspapers to CHNC! If you would like to learn more about becoming a CHNC partner and how to add historic news to CHNC please contact me at ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.

Further Reading and Related Historic Collections:

CHNC logo

Categories
Plains to Peaks Collective

Ready… Set….Go!

A group of six WSC coeds ready for a race on the ice skating rink, WSC campus, ca. early 1940s. Courtesy, Leslie J. Savage Library.

Earlier this month the Plains to Peaks Collective went live with its first collection in the Digital Public Library of America.  We know that there may be potential partners in Colorado and Wyoming that are eager to participate but are unsure if they are ready.  Good news! We are here to help you determine that.  We created the below checklist to help you determine if your institution is ready to contribute metadata records to DPLA through the PPC.

  1. Do you have digital collections that are publicly available? If not, see our Digital Toolkit for digitization project planning and implementation.
  2. Is your institution able and willing to sign the PPC Service Hub Participation Agreement agreeing to contribute your metadata to the DPLA under a CC0 license? Here is the PPC Service Hub Participation Agreement Template.
  3. Are your digital collections (images, texts, audio, video, etc.) available on a publicly accessible collections management system?
  4. Do the digital collections that you wish to share meet the DPLA’s current Collection Development Guidelines? The DPLA currently does not accept the following:
    • Most Scholarly material (i.e. electronic thesis and dissertations, journal articles). See Collection Development Guidelines for more information.
    • Finding aids or archival collection guides (i.e. EAD files)
    • Items that do not resolve to a publicly accessible URL (i.e. embargoed, hidden or restricted files.)
    • Datasets
  5. Does your Content Management System (CMS) have a way of sharing your collection metadata, for example through an OAI-PMH feed, API, xml export or CSV file? [If you are unsure please contact us.]
  6. Do each of the records in your collection include a unique title field and a valid rights statement? See the PPC Metadata Guidelines for further information on the DPLA requirements.
  7. Does your system store preview/thumbnail images of the objects in your collection?
  8. Are you able to provide, in each of your records, a link back to the record on your local site? [This link allows the DPLA portal to point back to each object in its local context.]
  9. Do you have a staff member who can work with PPC staff to address any issues related to sharing your collection metadata with the DPLA?

If you have any questions about the above considerations and/or are unsure if you meet the requirements for contributing to the PPC and the DPLA, please contact us. We are very willing to work with potential partners to fulfill the requirements listed above. If you would like to learn more about the PPC visit our site, ppc.cvlsites.org or contact me at ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org

[Checklist adapted from PA Digital Readiness Guidelines. Thanks PA!]

 

Categories
Plains to Peaks Collective

Plains to Peaks Collective Shares Historic Collections from Colorado and Wyoming with the Digital Public Library of America

The Colorado State Library is happy to announce that historic collections from Colorado and Wyoming are now part of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The DPLA website (dp.la) is a free portal that allows visitors to discover over 21 million unique items from across the United States and then go directly to the digital collections held at the home institution. Visit the Colorado and Wyoming collections in the DPLA here.

The Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC), the Colorado-Wyoming Service Hub of the DPLA, is a collaboration between the Colorado State Library and the Wyoming State Library that brings together descriptive information about collection material held by our libraries, archives, and museums, and makes it freely available to the world. Through the PPC institutions can now share their unique digital collections with a wider national audience of avid researchers, genealogists, students, teachers and history buffs. It is our hope that every institution in Colorado and Wyoming has the opportunity to participate in the DPLA through the PPC.

Many institutions in our two states hold unique stories of local and national significance. Together, these items tell the story of the people, places, events and cultures that shaped the history of Colorado, Wyoming and American West.

For its inaugural collection, the PPC partnered with seven institutions—Denver Public Library, Colorado State Publications Library, History Colorado, Colorado College, University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center and the Marmot Library Network—which represent the unique landscapes of Vail, Gunnison, Salida, Durango and Laramie and many other towns. By bringing this collection information together, DPLA visitors can now explore over 46,000 unique collection items from Colorado and Wyoming through one search, as well as through online exhibits and classroom primary source sets.

Denver and Rio Grande Roadhouse in Salida, 1890. Courtesy, Salida Regional Library.

Looking south along Second Street, Laramie, [1910-1920]. Courtesy, American Heritage Center

Parade in Durango, Colorado (between 1907 and 1929). Courtesy Fort Lewis College.

Collection highlights include the 10th Mountain Division, a full division of the United States Army  specializing in mountain and winter warfare who trained at Camp Hale, Colorado, during World War II. Many of these soldiers on skies were veterans who were instrumental to the development of Colorado’s beloved ski industry and to the growth of Colorado’s recreation industry and nature conservation.

10th Mountain Division M29 “Weasel” Light Cargo, Carrier, (between 1942 and 1945). Courtesy History Colorado.

Ski Troopers, U.S. Army, Camp Hale, 1944. Courtesy Eagle Valley Library District.

DPLA visitors can also explore materials that document the life and culture of the native peoples that inhabited our two states.  The inaugural collection contains items from Mesa Verde, the seasonal home of the ancestral Pueblo people who lived in southwest Colorado for over 700 years; historic images of Lakota, Arapahoe, Cheyenne and other tribes in Colorado; as well as historic images of the Crow and Shoshone tribes in Wyoming.

Mesa Verde storage jar, 1180-1280. Courtesy History Colorado

Indians – Crow; White Swan and Curley on Their Horses. Courtesy American Heritage Center.

Sitting Bull’s family, in front of cabin, 1880-89. Courtesy Denver Public Library

The collections of our initial partners, Colorado College and the University of Wyoming, also reveal the vast and diverse collections held by our universities. DPLA visitors can explore collections that document student life, faculty work and university initiatives. Included in these collections is the University of Wyoming’s 75 years initiative to create experimental farms to better serve the state.

Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin No. 085 – Feeding experiments, 1909-10. Courtesy University of Wyoming.

A costume rendering of Mozart’s Queen of the Night, 1991, by Gypsy Ames, professor of Drama and Dance at Colorado College. Courtesy Colorado College.

We want to grow the collection! These first collections are only a part of the vast historical treasures that are held by our cultural heritage organizations.  We will continue to grow our partners and help them share their collections with the DPLA every few months. To learn more about the PPC or if you would like to share your unique historic digital collections with the DPLA, please contact Leigh Jeremias at ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org or 720-483-4261.  We are currently gathering information about all institutions that would like to participate in the future so please reach out.  Information about the PPC can be found at: http://ppc.cvlsites.org/

 

Categories
Touring Colorado's Collections

Touring Colorado’s Collections: Pine River Library and the Stories of Bayfield, CO

A small town with a long history is a community with stories to tell; stories of hard times and harsh winters, but also of optimism and opportunity. Families who have lived for generations in Bayfield, Colorado are the keepers of their community’s stories and tell the tales of homesteaders, ranchers, farmers, and the railroad, to say nothing of family histories. Fortunately, the Pine River Library, along with its partner the Pine River Valley Heritage Society, is preserving and sharing these stories online through their newly launched Pine River Library Digital Collection site. It features three unique historical collections: Bayfield High School Yearbooks, Pine River Valley Heritage Society Oral History Collection, and The Missionary Ridge Fire 2002.

The Collections

Lavenia McCoy (pictured here in 1953) was a teacher and librarian at Bayfield High School. Her 2004 interview is part of the Oral History Collection.

The Oral History Collection was a series of interviews recorded in the early 2000s by the Pine River Valley Heritage Society and loaned to the Pine River Library as part of the Heritage Hub Project. Interviewer and longtime Bayfield resident James “Jim” Frahm sat down with other residents to capture their recollections of the town and their families. Retired school teacher and librarian Lavenia McCoy recalled the electrification of Bayfield, the first television, and the founding of the public library. Other interviewees discussed hunting, ranching, homesteading, and their relationships with other local families, neighboring towns, and Native Americans.

Elizabeth vonTauffkirchen, Digital Services Manager at Pine River Library, commented on her experience working on the Oral History Collection:

Working with the Pine River Heritage Society and the Bayfield Senior Center has been a surprise and a delight! I have received nothing but excitement and support by each new person I encounter at both organizations. Constructive partnerships have a particular energy that invigorates projects and drives them forward. The multiple, active, engaged partners in this project have contributed to make a product I am proud to share with our public!

Bayfield High School support staff, The Wolverine, 1953.

It’s not surprising, given the close-knit nature of the Bayfield community, that many of the family names mentioned in the oral histories also show up in The Wolverine, Bayfield High School’s yearbook. Pine River Library worked with Oklahoma Correctional Industries (OCI) to digitize 28 yearbooks spanning 1950-1986. Elizabeth noted that “OCI has done a wonderful job digitizing our local high school yearbooks as part of a grant-funded program to assist prisoners with viable job skills while preserving yearbooks for schools, libraries, and museums.”

Bayfield’s class sizes were small in the 1950s—some graduating classes were no more than 12—but even so the yearbooks depict a typical American high school experience of sports, clubs, proms, class clowns, and senior “wills” (“I, Gordon Powell, will my haircut to Donald Sower,” 1955). Longtime Bayfield residents will almost certainly spot some familiar names and faces on these pages.

 

The third collection, The Missionary Ridge Fire 2002, focuses on an important moment in La Plata County history, when a wildfire destroyed 72,962 acres and 46 houses over 39 days during the summer of 2002. The collection contains video footage of the fire as well as a video produced after the fire by San Juan Public Lands Center (San Juan National Forest & Bureau of Land Management), La Plata County Office of Emergency Preparedness, Fort Lewis College Office of Community Services, and Durango Community Access Television.

The Project

Pine River Library partnered with the Colorado State Library to create the Pine River Library Digital Collection, which is built on the open-source tool Omeka. Omeka’s capabilities will allow Pine River Library to eventually contribute information about its digitized artifacts via the Plains to Peaks Collective to the Digital Public Library of America, a national platform for discovering historical collections. Soon educators, students, researchers, and history enthusiasts will be able to learn about the history of Bayfield and La Plata County as told by its residents in their own voices.

Elizabeth reflected further on the Pine River Library Digital Collection:

This project has been (and continues to be) challenging and rewarding. Digitizing the stories of our town’s residents is such an important step in preserving our local heritage.

The opportunity to partner with the Colorado State Library on this site has been a fun adventure; I started this project as a complete novice in regard to archiving and metadata. I have learned volumes and yet have much more to learn in this area. This project is the perfect vehicle for that growth. I like to think we’re blazing the trail and other libraries will add similar sites in our wake.


For more information about the Pine River Library and Colorado State Library partnership, or to learn more about sharing your organization’s historical collections using Omeka, please contact:

Amy Hitchner
Collaborative Programming Coordinator
Colorado State Library
ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org

Categories
Digital Colorado

Hey Teachers – Amazing Primary Sources and Source Sets Available Online

Want to capture the attention and imagination of your students, and get them involved in history in an immersive way – explore incorporating primary sources into your curriculum.  Primary sources are the voices of the past. They are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They differ from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without firsthand experience.  Documents, letters, posters, film, artifacts, photographs, maps, etc. can all be primary sources that tell the story of people, places, and events of the past.

There are many online sites that share quality primary source materials and ready made primary source sets, the Colorado Department of Education being one of them.  Several years ago, 15 Colorado educators and digital collection professionals from the Denver Metro area got together to create a series of primary source sets aimed at K-6 teachers and students.  The results of this effort total more than 20 primary source sets, covering topics from the History of the American Bison to the Games and Toys of Yesteryear, and can be found on the CDE website at: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cosocialstudies/pssets.  The CDE primary source sets are comprised of three parts:   Lesson Overview, Primary Source Set and Lesson Ideas, and a Resource Set.  If you have not already seen these wonderful resources, check them out.  They may be just what you need to make a topic pop for your students.

Another great location for exciting primary source sets and their related primary sources is the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).  The DPLA is a free, national digital library that provides access to primary and secondary sources from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. The thousands of contributors to DPLA represent cultural institutions large and small, from the National Archives and the Smithsonian, to college and university special collections, to local historical societies, museums, and public libraries.  Libraries and museums in Colorado and Wyoming are contributing to this growing collection through the Plains to Peaks Collective Service Hub,  so our unique primary sources are available through the DPLA for your use as well.

The DPLA has created primary source sets that use primary sources to tell stories of national significance.  DPLA’s Primary Source Sets are specifically designed for use by teachers and students in middle school through college. DPLA has worked with a team of educators to design, create, and peer review more than 100 Primary Source Sets on topics in US History, American Literature, Art, and Science, which draw from the vast and diverse primary sources found in DPLA. Each Set includes an overview with background information, ten to fifteen primary sources, and a teaching guide with discussion questions, activities, and tools for primary source analysis. These “highlight reels” from DPLA are free, classroom-ready resources designed to save teachers and students time while offering instructional ideas intended to spark educator creativity.

DPLA also creates and makes available online exhibitions that offer in-depth explorations of important events and ideas in American history, such as the Race to the MoonJapanese Internment, the New DealAmerica during the Age of Imperialism, and Outsider Candidates in U.S. Presidential Elections. Pairing archival sources with contextual information, these exhibitions narrate the how and why of important historical moments and showcase the wealth of materials available for study.

There are other locations where expertly crafted primary source sets can be found including the Library of Congress and other national entities.  But, there are even more places where you can actually find primary sources to fashion your own teaching resources and tools.  Take your classroom to the next level by incorporating primary source materials into your teaching and help bring history alive.  Here are some great resources to start you on your primary source journey.

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

CHNC Welcomes School of Mines Oredigger

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection is thrilled to welcome the Colorado School of Mines student newspaper, The Oredigger, to our collection. Nearly a century after its establishment, The Oredigger’s addition to the CHNC represents a big step toward our goal of making Colorado university newspapers an integral part of our online archive. Students and non-student enthusiasts alike will now have free access to digitized versions of The Oredigger, searchable by date, keyword, and selected topics.

The first installment of The Oredigger to our collection includes over 2,200 pages of issues spanning from 1921 through 1936. Founded just the year prior in 1920 as a weekly publication, The Oredigger offers a unique perspective on this tumultuous time in our state and nation’s history. From the restless years of Prohibition to the first stirrings of the Second World War, this newspaper gives readers a window into the unique world that was mountain university life in the heart of Colorado, and more specifically, life at the Colorado’s School of Mines.

Two Mines students congratulate one another on Athletic Board victory
Image from April 9, 1935 edition of The Oredigger

In these issues spanning fifteen short years, readers can discover the origins of The Colorado School of Mines’ coveted silver diplomas, as well as the famous mountainside “M” and subsequent first ever “M climb.” The Oredigger is not just an important piece of Colorado history, but a part of the unique story that only Colorado’s student voices can tell.  We at the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection are honored to be a part of this legacy and promise not to leave you hanging at 1936 for long. The CHNC will continue to work with the School of Mines in the coming months to add more and more years of The Oredigger to our online archive so that readers can trace Mines history through the decades.

“We’re thrilled to work with CHNC to make these issues of the Colorado School of Mines’ Oredigger newspaper accessible to all. As the School’s longest running serial still in publication today, the Oredigger represents Mines history and of the history of Colorado from the viewpoint of our student body. We’ve got some unique stories to share. It will be great to add the Oredigger’s voice to that of Colorado’s other newspapers to put together all of our stories of ‘what it was like’ back then.”

-Lisa G. Dunn, Colorado School of Mines Arthur Lakes Library Research Librarian and Special Collections Manager

So whether you’re doing research, brushing up on your Mines history, or just browsing for pleasure, head over to the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection website, check out our great selection of Oredigger issues, and make sure to check back as we continue to add to the archive. We could not be more excited about welcoming The Oredigger to our collection and look forward to growing our relationship with The School of Mines as we work toward improving access to its rich history for everyone. “Give ‘em Hell, Mines!”

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Help is Here for Newspaper Digitization!

CHNC New Content Support Program

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce a new program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.  We want to help local communities add their historic stories to the larger Colorado footprint.

About CHNC

A service of the Colorado State Library, the CHNC currently includes more than 1 million digitized pages, representing more than 230 individual newspaper titles published in Colorado primarily from 1859 through 1922. Due to copyright restrictions, the CHNC does not always include newspapers published after 1922, but the CHNC can digitize beyond 1922 if publisher permission can be secured.

On-going support for maintaining, developing, and providing access to the CHNC is paid for with state and federal funds administered by the Colorado State Library. We continue to add new pages to the CHNC when community funding is located to pay the costs of digitization. The long-term goal for the CHNC is to provide access to all newspapers published in Colorado between 1859 and 1922, the time period for which publications are in the public domain and without copyright restrictions. Over 2 million pages from over 200 Colorado newspapers from this time period are available for digitization.

Awards

Program funding will be awarded for the digitization of newspapers on microfilm or in original format; the processing of digital files including segmentation of pages into articles, advertisements and illustrations; the creation of metadata; OCR transcription of newspaper text and inclusion in the CHNC online database.  Support awards can only be used to cover the cost of digitizing newspaper pages for inclusion in the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection, and will be applied by the Colorado State Library to support the actual digitization process through their chosen vendor partners.

In Spring of 2018, CHNC will award $15,000 in support for newspaper digitization projects. Institutions can apply for a maximum of $3,000 of support and a minimum of $1,500 towards the digitization of newspapers for inclusion in the CHNC. All support awards require a 25{66eaadba41c14e7e553ffe7a4ee73fbae213b19704eda0514b3dd79e37e4c0c5} cash match.  The cash match needs to be provided to CHNC by June 30, 2018. The amount of funding requested by applicants will determine how many projects will be funded.

Who Can Apply

We strongly encourage institutions that are not currently CHNC partners to apply.  Special consideration will be given to newspaper content that is underrepresented in CHNC such as geographic areas, ethnic groups, social movements and non standard content types such as academic newspapers and company newsletters.

Private individuals wishing to apply for support funding should be partnered with a local cultural heritage organization such as a library, archives, museum, friends group or association.  Single individuals without affiliation will not be considered.

Application Process

Complete all questions on the application form, found here.  Incomplete applications will not be considered.  Applications received on or before February 28, 2018 will be considered.

Successful projects will be selected by the Program Committee.  Projects will be evaluated on the historical significance of proposed newspaper title, support of content areas that are currently underrepresented in CHNC and plans for community engagement.  Special consideration will be given to institutions that are not currently CHNC partners.

Application Rubric

Total available points = 50 pts

  • Completed form = 5 Pts
  • Historical significance of title(s) = 1 – 10 pts
  • Support of Content Areas not currently represented = 1 – 10 pts
  • New title to CHNC = 5pts
  • New Partner to CHNC = 10 pts
  • Plans for ongoing community engagement and promotion = 1-10 pts

Project Period or Timeline

The project time period is from April 1, 2018 to December 30, 2018.  Any digitization work needs to be in process by December 15, 2018.

Deadline

Completed applications must be received on or before February 28, 2018.

Awards

Awardees will be notified by March 15, 2018.

Questions

If you have questions about the support program or the application process please contact Leigh Jeremias, ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org.

 

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

CHNC News: Golden Historic News is Growing!

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection now includes over 9,500 more pages of the Colorado Transcript! With a shared mission of enhancing access to Golden history the Golden History Museum & Park and the Jefferson County Archives recently partnered together to add the years 1925-1948 to CHNC.

Founder George West published the first issue of the Colorado Transcript on December 19, 1866. At the time, Golden City, as it was known, was serving as capital of the Territory of Colorado.  The Transcript was the third newspaper,  the second for West, to be published in Golden which early on served as a trading center for the mining camps that sprang up around 1858 along the Clear Creek.

West was a leader and well respected in Colorado’s newspaper industry. The Transcript enjoyed immense popularity rivaling that of the Rocky Mountain News.  In 1906, at the age of 80 years, George West died after running the Transcript for nearly 40 years.  After West’s death, ownership of the Transcript passed from one West generation onto the next until 1960 when it passed out of the family.  The paper, whose name changed to the Golden Transcript in 1955 is still published today.

This recent addition to CHNC is just the start of the Museum and Archives’ long term goal of making additional years of this important Golden newspaper available online through CHNC.  Curator Mark Dodge said the Museum is excited  “to contribute to the CHNC. Access to our newspaper collection has remained a museum priority since 2015, when the Golden Library donated their local history collection to the Golden History Museum & Park.  We’re equally grateful for our cost-sharing partnership with the Jefferson County Archive and look forward to digitizing the entire Colorado Transcript in the coming years. It will now be much easier for all to discover the Depression and World War II eras in Jefferson County and Golden.”

CHNC is excited to be part of collaborative projects like this one which not only benefits the citizens of Golden but also the citizens of Colorado.

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