Categories
Book Club Resource

Celebrating Black Voices with the Book Club Resource

The Colorado State Library would like to invite everyone to celebrate Black History Month with our newly updated Book Club Resource! Over the past year, we have refocused our energy toward making our book club collection more diverse and inclusive, so that readers from all cultures and backgrounds can find stories for them written by someone like them. This Black History Month, we are proud to highlight some of our favorite black voices as we remember the struggles of the past and work toward a more equitable future.

 

Citizen: An American Lyric
by Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine’s bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named “post-race” society.

 

The Underground Railroad
by Colson Whitehead

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned—Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

Like the protagonist of Gulliver’s Travels, Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey—hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre–Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.

 

March: Book 1
by John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper’s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

 

The Origins of Others
by Toni Morrison

America’s foremost novelist reflects on the themes that preoccupy her work and increasingly dominate national and world politics: race, fear, borders, the mass movement of peoples, the desire for belonging. What is race and why does it matter? What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid?

Drawing on her Norton Lectures, Toni Morrison takes up these and other vital questions bearing on identity in The Origin of Others. In her search for answers, the novelist considers her own memories as well as history, politics, and especially literature. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and Camara Laye are among the authors she examines. Readers of Morrison’s fiction will welcome her discussions of some of her most celebrated books―BelovedParadise, and A Mercy.

If we learn racism by example, then literature plays an important part in the history of race in America, both negatively and positively. Morrison writes about nineteenth-century literary efforts to romance slavery, contrasting them with the scientific racism of Samuel Cartwright and the banal diaries of the plantation overseer and slaveholder Thomas Thistlewood. She looks at configurations of blackness, notions of racial purity, and the ways in which literature employs skin color to reveal character or drive narrative. Expanding the scope of her concern, she also addresses globalization and the mass movement of peoples in this century. National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates provides a foreword to Morrison’s most personal work of nonfiction to date.

 

The Coldest Winter Ever
by Sister Souljah

During one of New York’s worst snow storms, Winter is born to Ricky Santiaga and his wife. At the age of sixteen, Winter is well-accustomed to a life of decadence provided by her notorious father who commands an intricate family web of drug dealers in their Brooklyn ghetto. As familiar as she is with riches, she is also acutely aware of the devastation of urban poverty to which she is determined never to succumb.

Her father’s decision to move his family to Dix Hills, an affluent Long Island suburb, creates unimaginable consequences. Winter is left alone to find her way precariously through the shifting maze of power, sex, money, and drugs, determined to vindicate her father and rise above the laws, social welfare system, poverty, and dangers that surround her.

Author Sister Souljah, a political activist, is a part of this story as a constant voice through all of Winter’s struggles. Winter hears Souljah’s voice intermittently on the radio and lives with her briefly while in pursuit of her own dubious ambitions. Souljah’s pleas to the young black women she works with to realize their dignity, beauty, and inner power fail to find a place to rest in Winter’s driven spirit.

The Coldest Winter Ever is a fast-moving, impeccably brilliant account of choices and consequences within the urban hip-hop culture. Sister Souljah writes eloquently with expressive insights and language of youth. Amidst the crisis and cruelty of inner city poverty and seemingly insurmountable struggles, Sister Souljah’s voice is one of grace and unmistakable clarity in one young woman’s coming-of-age story.

 

Celebrate black history all year long by checking out these and many other great titles from the Colorado State Library’s Book Club Resource!

(All book descriptions taken from Amazon.com)

Categories
20th Century & Beyond

Elvin R. Caldwell: City Council President, Activist, Community Leader

When: 1919 – 2004

Where: Denver, Colorado

Why Important: First African-American City Council Member West of the Mississippi, Civil Rights advocate, policy-maker, and life-long community leader and organizer.

Biography

Elvin R. Caldwell was born in Denver on April 11, 1919 and grew up in the historic Five Points neighborhood, which was a predominantly black neighborhood at that time. Though Caldwell’s family and many of the families in his neighborhood were prosperous, they faced racial discrimination, inequality, and exclusion from white Denver society. Caldwell’s parents, Wilba and Inez, fought against this discrimination, setting an example for Elvin that would inspire him and shape the rest of his life as an advocate for equality. Caldwell graduated from Eastside High School in 1937 and received a track scholarship to the University of Colorado and later, the University of Denver.

In 1941, Caldwell married Frank “Frankie” Harriette Webb, a teacher, and the couple had four children: Elvin Jr., John, Kenneth, and Frances. During World War II, Caldwell served as a chief statistician and assistant superintendent for production at the Remington Arms Company. After the war ended, many of Denver’s black residents lost their jobs to returning white servicemen, while many returning black servicemen faced discrimination back home in the country they had fought for. Caldwell firmly believed that all Americans were equal and deserved full rights, so he took his fight to the Colorado State Government.

In 1950, at age 31, Caldwell was elected to the Colorado House of Representatives where he served until 1955 when he was elected to the Denver City Council, making him the first African American to serve on a city council seat west of the Mississippi. Caldwell served on the Denver City Council for 28 years, with five years spent as president of the council. During this time Caldwell was deeply involved with the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA), which was created to eliminate slum housing with assistance from Federal Grants. He also fought against discriminatory lending practices by banks, which refused to offer home loans in predominantly black neighborhoods. Until the 1970’s, nonwhites were barred from serving as judges or being promoted within the police force and could only serve in the one African American fire Station. Caldwell persistently contested these practices and under his leadership, Colorado implemented its first Fair Employment Practices Act. In 1980, Denver Mayor William H. McNichols Jr. named Caldwell Manager of Safety, making him the first black member of a Denver Mayoral Cabinet.

In addition to his years of political service, Caldwell was actively involved in many community organizations. He served as a board member for the Glenarm Branch of the YMCA, the Boy Scouts of America, and PAL of Denver. He also served on the board of directors for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Opportunities Industrialization Center, The Denver Improvement Association, the Five Points Businessmen’s Association, and the Colorado Municipal League. To honor his service and dedication to equality in Colorado, in 1990, the Denver City Council created the Elvin R. Caldwell Community Service Plaza. In April of 2003, the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library opened its doors bearing his name, just 1 year before his death in April 2004. Elvin R. Caldwell was a tireless champion of the Civil Rights Movement, a steadfast advocate for equality and a deeply passionate community leader who dedicated his life to making Colorado and the United States a better place for all people.

This bio is brought to you by the Colorado State Library with thanks to the Colorado Encyclopedia

Categories
Digital Colorado

SIPA is Here to Help

The SIPA (Statewide Internet Portal Authority) recently opened applications for its 2019 Micro-Grant program.   The program is designed for state and local governments, special districts and public education in Colorado to put more information and services online.  Grant funding is available for hardware, professional services, innovation, digitization
project planning and broadband.  Example projects include, digitization and online access of historical collections, school programming, information kiosks and interactive mapping. 

Mark you calendar for SIPA’s 2018-19 grant application timeline:

  • November 30, 2018: Grant applications open
  • January 18, 2019: Grant applications due by 5pm MST
  • January 19 – March 1, 2019: SIPA review period
  • March 4– 8, 2019: SIPA will announce the 2019 grant awardees
  • April 16, 2019: Awards are given at the annual SIPA User Conference and Grant Ceremony

If you have questions about the grant application process please refer to SIPA’s frequently Asked Questions page or email sipa@cosipa.gov.  I am also happy to offer advice on proposed historic collection projects.  You are welcomed to contact me at ljeremias@coloradovituallibrary.org.

Categories
Plains to Peaks Collective

Big Opportunities for Small Libraries: IMLS Launches New Special Initiative

The Institute of Museum and Library Services has launched a new special initiative, Accelerating Promising Practices for Small Libraries (APP), and is accepting grant applications now through February 25, 2019. This new funding opportunity is designed specifically to strengthen the ability of small and rural libraries, archives, and related organizations to serve their communities, and awards sizes range from $10,000 to $50,000.

The initiative is in line with the IMLS Strategic Plan 2018-2022, Transforming Communities, which includes goals of lifelong learning, increasing public access, and building capacity. APP is a special initiative of National Leadership Grants for Libraries, which support projects that enhance the quality of library and archives services nationwide by advancing theory and practice.

“We’re pleased to support the work of small libraries and archives across our nation who are essential to their communities in so many ways,” said IMLS Deputy Director of Library Services Robin Dale. “These grants will provide opportunities for small libraries who provide such important programs and services at a local level to impact new, promising practices on a national scale.”

Categories: Three categories of APP grants are available to applicants:

  • Transforming School Library Practice: School libraries support learning and the development of critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration skills. IMLS is interested in furthering how school library professionals can serve as integral instructional partners to classroom teachers. Grant projects could include programs and services that prepare students for success in college, career, and life, or foster early, digital, information, health, financial, media, civic, and other types of literacies. 
  • Community Memory: Libraries and archives not only serve as stewards of our nation’s knowledge and collections, but also as trusted spaces for community engagement and dialogue. This project category centers on engaging local communities in the collection, documentation, and preservation of their local histories, experiences, and identities. Proposals could include events and programs to digitize materials related to community histories, such as photographs, artifacts, or texts, or oral history projects that involve community members in the documentation and preservation of local histories. 
  • Digital Inclusion: Libraries have an important role in promoting digital inclusion and increasing access to information, ideas, and networks. This category focuses on projects that support the role libraries play in promoting digital literacy, providing internet access, and enabling community engagement through civic data and civic technology. Grant proposals could include programs supporting broadband access and wireless networks to address the homework gap, increase small business development and entrepreneurship, or plan for emergency preparedness.

Cohort Learning and Evaluation:  Grantees in this initiative will participate in communities of practice based on their project category. Three third-party mentor organizations will lead these cohorts, providing expert guidance and facilitating communication between grantees.

“Using an approach similar to IMLS’s Community Catalyst initiative, these new grants will support small libraries—some who may be applying for their first federal grant—through capacity building and cohort style learning,” said Dale.

This component of the grant is designed to promote shared knowledge, build grantee capacity in relevant areas, and grow networks in the library and archives fields. In addition, IMLS intends to identify and support a third-party organization to evaluate this initiative.

Who is Eligible? This grant opportunity is designed for small and rural libraries and archives, and applicants should consider how their organization might be a good fit. There are a number of ways to be “small,” and attributes of “small” libraries or archives could include:

  • size of the staff and volunteer corps;
  • operating budget and sources of revenue;
  • size of the collection and range of services provided;
  • size of facility and property;
  • types, numbers, and geographic distribution of audiences served; and size relative to other organizations of the same discipline or within the same geographic region.

Institution types could include rural or urban public libraries, Native American tribal libraries, school districts representing elementary through secondary school libraries, or research or special libraries. For more details, please read the notice of funding opportunity (PDF 384KB).

Webinars:  Two pre-application webinars will be held with program staff to answer questions from potential applicants. The webinars, which will each cover the same material, are scheduled for:

Recordings of the webinars will also be made available on the IMLS website. For information about how to participate in the webinars or to access the webinar recordings, see the IMLS webinar page.

Categories
Colorado's Beginnings

John Charles Frémont: Senator, Governor, Presidential Candidate, and Explorer

Portrait: John Charles Fremont (Photo from britannica.com)

 

When: 1813-1890

Where: Colorado’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains

Why important: Explorer, Presidential Candidate, Civil War General

Biography

John Charles Frémont’s life was a series of ups and downs.  He ran for president, but lost.  He served as a civil war general, but was ridiculed for his approach.  And even before all that, he led an expedition through Colorado’s rugged Sangre de Cristo Mountains that ended in disaster with deaths of 10 members of the party.

Frémont began his career as an explorer while he was a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Corps of Topographical Engineers.  When he was 28 years old, Frémont married the 16-year-old daughter of powerful Missouri senator, Thomas Hart Benton. Though the Senator was very angry at first, he eventually accepted his daughter’s marriage and offered financial and political support to Frémont for his expeditions to the West. In 1841, Frémont mapped the Des Moines River in Iowa.  Moving further west, Frémont teamed up with Kit Carson on expeditions through the Sierra Nevada Mountains all the way to Lake Tahoe.  He also led expeditions to Utah, Oregon, and California, where he even served as military governor.

Portrait: Kit Carson and John C. Frémont Photo from the Museum of the San Fernando Valley

In 1845, Frémont set out on his first expedition through the land that would eventually become Colorado with Kit Carson in search of the source of the Arkansas River. Three years later, Frémont lead another expedition along the Arkansas, but when the party reached Bent’s Fort, trappers there told them that they were too late in the season to make it across the mountains before winter hit.  However, Frémont wanted to prove that his route to California was passable year round, so he ignored the trappers’ advice and pushed on.  The party started off successfully until Frémont made a sudden decision to turn south of the River.  As a result, his guide, Richens “Uncle Dick” Wootton and several other members of the party turned back.  Frémont and the remaining members became snowbound in the mountains and 10 men died. Frémont was criticized for his poor decisions regarding the expedition and as a result, his reputation suffered.

Because of his strong political connections, however, Frémont was able to regain his reputation and within only eight years after the disastrous expedition, he was chosen as the presidential candidate of the newly-founded Republic party. The party’s main platform was anti-slavery and Frémont’s campaign slogan was “Free Men, Free Soil, Frémont.” Unfortunately, Frémont’s own father-in-law, Thomas Hart, endorsed democratic candidate, James Buchanan, losing credibility for Frémont.

Col. John C. Fremont in the Rocky Mountains (Photo from Nevada Public Radio)

Though Frémont lost the presidential election, his political career was far from over. He served as a U.S. Senator from California, Governor of Arizona Territory, and Major General in during the Civil war. He also created controversy when he issued a proclamation freeing all slaves in Missouri.  The proclamation was not recognized by the U.S. government, however, and Frémont was removed from command.

Frémont spent most of the remainder of his life in Arizona and New York, where he became involved in railroad development. Although he never lived in Colorado, he played a key role in its early exploration earning him the nickname, “The Pathfinder” and the honor of having Fremont County, Colorado named for him.

This bio is brought to you by the Colorado State Library

 

Categories
Digital Colorado Learning

Teacher Librarian Day 2019 – Registration open

Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Western Region is proud to announce the 15th annual Teacher Librarian Day on Friday, February 15th, 2019.

This year’s theme is Voices. From our students to our mentors, the everlasting voices throughout each of our lives give us reason for empathyperspective, and rational understanding of the world around us. Recognizing every voice and developing these skills in our students through primary sources as windows of the past help our communities to become more civically mindedthoughtful, and curious.

The morning of TLD will offer inspiring short TED-style talks focusing on innovative ways to use primary sources in the K-16 classroom. In addition, the afternoon of TLD will feature hour-long breakout sessions from a number of our speakers as well as educational partners in Colorado.

What You Should Know:

  • When: February 15th, 2019
  • Where: History Colorado Center
  • Who should attend: K-16 teachers, librarians, and other educators. Come by yourself and bring your colleagues!
  • What to expect: A full day of innovative and inspiring professional development.
  • Substitute Reimbursement will be offered to the first 100 educators. Please select the “General Admission + Substitute Reimbursement” ticket option.
  • All attendees are eligible to register for .5 graduate credits offered through Adams State University.
  • A certificate showing 8 professional development hours will be given through email after the event.

Register for TLD 2019 now!

Categories
Boom Years

Otto Mears: Pathfinder of the San Juans

When: 1840 – 1931

Where: Born in Russia and came to America at the age of 11.

Why Important: Built 450 miles of toll roads that later became most of the modern roads in southwestern Colorado.  He also built three railroads in the San Juan Mountains that helped develop the area’s mining wealth.

Biography

Otto Mears was born in Estonia, which was part of Russia in 1840.  He was orphaned at an early age and was eventually sent to live with relatives in San Francisco, California when he was 11. Mears worked very hard from the time he arrived in America until he joined the California Volunteer infantry during the Civil War. In 1864, Mears travelled to Santa Fe for a short time before moving to the Saguache, CO where he opened a general store and married Mary Kampfshulte in 1870. That business eventually grew to include hardware stores in several towns in southwestern Colorado.

Travel in Colorado was still very difficult at that time and Mears needed to find ways to move his goods around the region, so in 1870 he began building toll roads with the Poncha Pass Wagon Road.  He went on to build more than a dozen toll roads covering more than 450 miles.  Among these was the famous Million Dollar Highway between Ouray and Silverton, and by 1883 no one could get in or out of the City of Ouray without traveling over a Mears toll road.

In 1887 Mears built the Silverton Railroad to tap the silver mines on Red Mountain Pass between Silverton and Ouray. Because he was responsible for the railroad, Mears was able to issue passes to his friends, family, and colleagues for unlimited travel on his rail lines. He printed these special passes first on paper, then on leather, and eventually created them out of engraved silver and gold. Today, these passes are very rare and valuable. Mears later built four more railroads, including the famed the Rio Grande Southern Railroad from Ridgway and Durango.

Mears wasn’t just a successful businessman. He was also very active in politics and involved in many of the treaty negotiations between the Ute Indians and the US Government. He spoke the Ute language and was a friend of Chief Ouray. Mears was also chosen as one of Colorado’s three presidential electors in 1876 and was elected to the Colorado Legislature in the 1880’s. Despite Mears’ many successes in Colorado however, the Silver Panic of 1893 hit his businesses hard, causing him to lose control of many of his Colorado enterprises.  In 1896 he moved to the east coast where he built the Chesapeake Bay Railroad, served as President of the Mack Truck Company, and built a railroad in Louisiana.

Mears returned to Colorado in 1906 and purchased a house in Silverton.  He continued to invest in mining activities and regained much of the fortune he had lost in the 1890s.  Otto retired to Pasadena, California in 1920 where he and Mary lived in the Maryland Hotel until Mary died in 1924 and Otto on June 24, 1931.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, September 28, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

ALA President to Visit Colorado

ALA President Loida Garcia-Febo will stop at Pikes Peak Library District as part of her “Libraries = Strong Communities” national tour to five library systems. All library professionals are warmly invited to her planned events on Oct. 5 & 6, 2018. Help spread the word!

Community Support

Looking for a new job in Summit County? Summit County Library is partnering with Frisco Workforce Center to offer a Resume and Job Search Drop-In on October 12 at the South Branch Library.

Clear Creek County Library District offers notary public services! Visit the Idaho Springs Public Library on Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays, or the John Tomay Memory Library on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Wellington Public Library is offering Foods to Fight Cancer, a nutrition and cooking class at the Senior Center on October 25. Learn how the right foods can help reduce your cancer risk or aid in preventing a recurrence. Register at the library.

Arapahoe Libraries is producing new patron videos featuring stories of impact. If you’re an Arapahoe patron with a story to share, and you’re willing to star in a video, fill out the Patron Video Project Application.

Celebrating Hobbies

Mesa County Libraries Comic Con is Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction. The event features guest speakers, panels, family-friendly cosplay contests, an exhibit hall, and more! Admission is free with your MCL library card.

Anythink wants to help you make your podcast dream a reality! Join them for Podcasting with Paul Karolyi, a two-part series at Anythink Wright Farms on Oct. 18 & 25, to learn every step of the process. Register online.

Bud Werner Memorial Library is hosting local spinners from northwest Colorado for Spinzilla, “a world-wide spinning event where competing teams and individuals challenge each other to see who can spin the most yarn in a week.” Cheer them on October 3 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Boulder Public Library encourages knitters, crocheters, and yarn lovers to help create Yarn-fiti, a communal yarn installation. Contributed designs will be part of the 3-D exhibition, which opens on October 31 in the Canyon Gallery. Drop off your pieces to the Main Library by October 21.

October is a month of fan cons and Halloween parties, so spiff up your costume at Broomfield Library’s Costume Clinic on October 2. Kids ages 9-18 are invited to use the electronic cutter, sewing machines, and digital embroidery machine to take their costumes to the next level. Registration required.

New State Librarian

The search is over! The Colorado State Library has hired a new Assistant Commissioner (aka State Librarian), Nicolle Ingui Davies! Nicolle was most recently the Executive Director of Charleston County Public Library in South Carolina, but you might know her better as the former Executive Director of Arapahoe Library District. Her appointment officially begins December 17. Please join us in extending a warm welcome to Nicolle.

Teen Groups

Riverside Teen Engineering Community Hub (T.E.C.H.) is a group for teens in High Plains Library District that creates fun activities focused on technology. Join them on October 9 at 5:30 pm at the Riverside Library and Cultural Center.

The Teen Council at Poudre River Public Library District is looking for creative teen minds to help plan a murder mystery event. They’ll help create the setting, the story, and the characters. The final planning meeting is October 2, with the event happening later in the month.

Historical Ties

The City of Louisville Historical Museum has a new website! Check out their new design, which was structured for easier searching and with growth in mind.

Louisville Historical Museum, 1989 [Photo courtesy: Louisville Times, June 21, 1989. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]
Dan Davidson, director of the Museum of Northwest Colorado, will deliver a presentation on the history of Moffat County Libraries and the Museum of Northwest Colorado, as well as a brief history of their founders, Rosetta Webb McKinney and Louise Miller. Join him on Sept. 29, 1:30 pm, at Sunset Meadows I in Craig.

Celebrate Pioneer Days on September 29 at the Old Town Museum in Burlington. This “living history festival” starts at 2:00 pm and features poker games, gunfight shows, apple bobbing, historical reenactments, chuck wagon cooking, horse-drawn carriage rides, live music, and more!

Libraries in the News

Greeley Tribune: High Plains Library District will offer fine forgiveness as part of food drive

Welcome to Brett Lear, new Executive Director of Garfield County Libraries. Brett has over 30 years of library experience, including positions at New York Public Library and Jefferson County Public Library. Read the announcement.

The Pueblo Chieftain: Pueblo library district named Colorado’s best| Pueblo City-County Library District

The Gazette: Woodmen Kid’s Corner: Therapy dogs provide kids with companionship while helping reading skills| Pikes Peak Library District

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Learning Opportunities

CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference

  • Oct. 12, 2018, 8:00 to 4:30
  • Arvada Center for the Arts & Humanities

CSL in Session: Curating your Best Collection

  • Oct. 23, 2018, 12:00 to 1:00
  • Free! No registration required
  • Join online

View other upcoming learning opportunities for September 2018. For Colorado-specific events check the Library Learning & Creation Center.

Colorado State Publications Library Blog

The Learning Edge

The Learning Edge is a series written by Christine Schein, CSL’s Digital Literacy Instructional Specialist. It summarizes new professional learning events and opportunities, digital learning resources, and news from the education field. Read the September 2018 edition.


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers Resource Sharing

CHNC Proudly Welcomes The Denver Voice!

This month, the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection welcomed the Denver Voice to its online catalog and we could not be more excited! Our users will now have access to nearly 100 issues of the Denver Voice, spanning from its first issue in 1996 right up to its brief hiatus in the spring of 2006 before it became a professional publication the following year. This unique newspaper doesn’t just tell the story of Denver in a time of tremendous change, it tells that story from the perspective of some of its most underrepresented and often unheard citizens: those experiencing homelessness.

While the Voice now reaches a broad and diverse audience, it began as a grassroots newspaper written by homeless people for homeless people. Its early issues include everything from news articles about encounters with local business owners and police to poetry and cartoons inspired by the hardships and joys of its unique community. Each issue also includes a list of places where its readers could find necessary resources like a meal, a bed, or bathroom and shower facilities. Most importantly though, the Voice offered (and still offers) an outlet for expression and a connection to a community for many people who were often marginalized and overlooked in their own city.

Though the Denver Voice of today looks very different from its humble beginnings, its mission statement remains focused on the transformative power of the stories it has told for over 20 years:

“Our mission is to facilitate a dialogue addressing the roots of homelessness by telling stories of people whose lives are impacted by poverty and homelessness and to offer economic, educational, and empowerment opportunities for the impoverished community.”
Denver Voice

We at the CHNC are honored to welcome the first 10 years of the Denver Voice to our collection and look forward to adding more years in the months to come! So come check out this truly amazing newspaper at ColoradoHistoricNewspapers.org and see how easy it is to broaden your perspective and change the way you see our uniquely Colorado history!

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Computer Science Resource Bank

There’s no question that computer science is becoming an increasingly important subject in today’s schools. If you’re a computer science teacher, be sure to check out the Colorado Department of Education’s new Computer Science Resource Bank. Here you’ll find “a variety of materials for computer science educators, including standards, curricula, and materials for professional educator development.” The resource bank can direct you to scholarships, cybersecurity resources, competitions, professional associations, teaching tools, learning environments, and much more. All of the suggested resources are coded for elementary, middle, and high school, making it easy to find what you need. Free resources are also highlighted. In the ever-changing environment of computer science, teachers can keep up with what’s new by using this handy resource.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, September 7, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Supporting Literacy

Jefferson County Public Library’s call-in series continues on Sept. 20 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. Author Margo Catts will talk about her book, Among the Lesser Gods, and her writing process. To join, call 303-502-5189 or visit uberconference.com/jcplhomeservices.

The Reading Buddies program at Eagle Valley Library District starts at the end of September. This program pairs teen volunteers (grades 9-12) with younger kids (grades 1-3) for an hour of one-on-one shared reading, once a week. Sign up today!

Bud Werner Memorial Library’s popular summer Read to Dogs program is continuing this fall. On Sept. 8, Oct. 13, and Nov. 10, kids and/or their parents can read aloud to a dog from Heeling Friends.

Making Music Together

Celebrate the end of summer with Arapahoe Libraries and The Margarita Brothers Band. Enjoy an outdoor concert of beach party tunes at Smoky Hills Library, September 8 from 4:00 to 6:00 pm.

The Longmont Public Library Ukulele Club meets the second Tuesday of the month starting September 11. Kay Miller from Rocky Mountain Ukulele Orchestra will lead this meetup for strummers of all levels, ages 16 and up. Please bring your own instrument.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Denver Public Library is joining organizations around the country for Welcome Week, September 14-23, which raises awareness of the benefits of welcoming immigrants and refugees. DPL’s lineup of events includes The Immigrant Refugee Experience: A Discussion on Sept. 18, and Voting Rights with the ACLU on Sept. 19.

Are you curious about the potential of space resources? Join Broomfield Library as they host Cosmic Quest, a program about the future of space travel and asteroid mining, presented by scientists, educators, and industry experts. September 13 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm.

Join the Discussion

At the Table Colorado brings together people from all walks of life during the same week to talk about what makes their communities great and what can be done to make them even better. Two Colorado libraries will be participating during the next ATTC event week, Sept. 17-20.

  • Mesa County Libraries is hosting a table on the topic “Should local governments be involved in public art?” Sept. 17, 6:00-7:00 pm.
  • Jefferson County Public Library is assisting with outreach to increase awareness of the event, has developed a reading resource list for Hosts and Guests, and has meeting space the public can use for Table discussions.

Learn more: watch an archived recording of a recent webinar about At the Table Colorado.

Libraries in the News

The Durango Herald: Libraries can help you realize your dreams, by Sandy Irwin | Durango Public Library

Craig Press: Craig City Council gets updates on Elkhead reservoir, museum, library | Moffat County Library

The College Fix: University library system adds ‘ethical’ search options so students can avoid the term ‘illegal aliens’ | University of Colorado Boulder

Congratulations to Donna Walker, newly appointed executive director of Jefferson County Public Library! Read the announcement.

Get Cookin’

Garfield County LibrariesFood for Thought: A Cookbook Club brings together adventurous home chefs to make and try new recipes. The next monthly meeting is September 18, 6:00 pm, at Parachute Branch Library.

Improve your cooking skills with Hayden Public Library and Natural Grocers. They are partnering to present  Back to School “Clean & Healthy” with nutritional health coach Alicia McLeod, Sept. 13 at 4:00 pm.

Arts & Crafts

As a part of their monthly “Family First Friday” series, and in celebration of Heritage Days in Bayfield, Pine River Library will host their own celebration of local sheep culture on Sept. 7 from 6:00 to 7:00 pm. Create a woolen craft, learn about the wool-making process, or bring your own fiber arts projects to show off. All ages welcome.

“Colorado Leads Nation in Sheep.” [Image courtesy: Colorado Transcript, July 15, 1937. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]
Experience a live glass-blowing demonstration by local artist Jacqueline McKinny, Sept. 22 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at Anythink Commerce City.

Get tips for creating better costumes at Douglas County Libraries in Parker. They’re teaming up with Colorado Fabrics and members of the cosplay community to offer a special cosplay program on September 8 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. Registration is required.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

CALCON18

Are you going to CALCON18, Sep. 13-15 in Loveland? Visit the Colorado State Library booth and meet some amazing service animals, plus attend a CSL-presented session.

Learning Opportunities

CSL in Session, Getting Unstuck: The Secret Life of Procrastinators, with Jean Heilig & Christine Kreger.

  • Sept. 20, 2018, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
  • Free; no registration needed; join online

CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference

  • Oct. 12, 2018, 8:00 to 4:30
  • Arvada Center for the Arts & Humanities

View other upcoming learning opportunities for September 2018. For Colorado-specific events check the Library Learning & Creation Center.

Colorado Blue Spruce Award

Blue Spruce is Colorado’s own young adult book award, selected by teens and educators. Visit the Colorado Blue Spruce Award website for a list of nominees, printable posters and bookmarks, and the link to submit your vote by December 31.

Book Challenges in Colorado

According to the Library Research Service, reported challenges in Colorado’s public libraries nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017, increasing from 22 to 41. It is unclear whether this is due to an actual increase in challenges or if it is the result of more thorough reporting. About half of Colorado’s challenged materials were intended for adults, and nearly three-quarters of all challenges resulted in no change.

Colorado State Publications Library Blog


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
CSL News

Colorado State Library at CALCON18

CALCON, the annual conference of the Colorado Association of Libraries, is September 13-15, 2018 in Loveland. The event features keynote speakers, sessions, lightning talks, vendor exhibits, and after-hours activities. This year’s theme is “Ignite the Magic”. Visit CALCON18 to view full event details.

As in previous years, the Colorado State Library is pleased to support CALCON18 in multiple ways. We are sponsoring keynote speaker Dr. Isabel Hawkins, an astronomer at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, who will speak about broadening the participation of underserved groups in the sciences.

In addition, several CSL staff members will present sessions throughout the conference, ranging in topics from User Experience (UX) and photography to procrastination and collaboration. See the schedule below for details.

Finally, we are excited to showcase service animals at our exhibit hall booth. Hearing Dogs for the Deaf  and Veteran’s Puppy for Life will visit on Thursday, and Dogs for the Blind will be with us on Friday. We hope you will stop by to say hi and meet a friendly pooch.

Colorado State Library Sessions

See the full schedule.

Thursday, September 13

10:15am

Don’t Say Cheese: How to Take Great Photos | Dave Hodgins & Linda Hofschire

11:30am

Connecting Families in a Digital World | Christine Schein

Friday, September 14

9:00am

The Secret Life of Procrastinators | Jean Marie Heilig & Christine Kreger

1:15pm

Doing UX? What you can do to Improve User Experience | Babi Hammond, Tiffany Clendenin, Chris Evjy, Kati Polodna, Anthony White

The Magic Bullet for Increased Productivity | Linda Hofschire

3:15pm

Discover Colorado: Taking the Library Outdoors | Beth Crist

Learning IS the Work: Taking Charge of Your Learning | Christine Kreger & Sharon Morris

Collaboration: It CAN be learned | Becky Russell & Molly Gibney

Saturday, September 15

9:00am

The Hidden Biases of Good People | Beth Crist & Jean Marie Heilig

11:30am

The 2 Generation Approach to Eliminating Poverty | Beth Crist & Becki Loughlin

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, August 24, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Arts & Crafts

In honor of the Yampa Valley Crane Festival, aerialist Heidi Miller and students from Spirit Wind Aerial Arts will perform at the Bud Werner Memorial Library on August 30 at 5:00 pm. See more events related to the Crane Festival.

Sandhill Cranes [Photo: Steamboat Pilot, Sept. 17, 1970. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]
Basalt Regional Library is holding its 1st Annual Film Competition. All pre-registered participants will receive an email on August 24 with the requirements for their film, which they will have 72 hours to complete. Submissions are due by 9:00 am on August 27. Learn more and register.

Join Anythink’s Experiments in Sound and participate in the creation of a sound installation. Anythink Brighton is hosting the event on August 27 from 1:30 to 3:30 pm; participants can work on sounds creations and experiment in recording.

Whether you sew, crochet, quilt, or knit, you are welcome at Pines & Plains Libraries’ Witty Knitters, a group of friendly and knowledgeable crafters that meets every Tuesday at 3:45 pm at the Simla Public Library.

View the works of local artists Tina Duemler and Alice Billings at Ridgway Public Library’s ART at the Library ART Show. The exhibition will be open Sep. 8 through Nov. 9, with an artists’ reception on Sep. 8 from 4:00 to 7:00 pm.

UNC University Libraries invites you to “Colorado Inspirations: photography and more by three generations of the Harms Family.” The exhibit is open Aug. 20 through Sep. 21 in the Mari Michener Gallery.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Last Saturday, Pine River Library held its fourth annual Zucchini Extravaganza in collaboration with Tour de Farms, Pine River Shares, and the Pine River Garden Club. The event included contests for best-dressed, best-carved, biggest, and ugliest squash, a zucchini-based potluck, and a zucchini slingshot.

Take a break in your day to participate in Midday Music Meditation. Boulder Public Library hosts this event every second Wednesday of the month, which features improvised music on the Turkish Oud, cello, zils, didgeridoo, autoharp, flutes, and more. The next Midday Music is September 12 at noon.

Become a library power user at Mesa County Libraries’ Library 101 presentation, August 29 at 9:30 am. Join staff from the Central Library for a tour of special spaces and information about the services and resources offered at the library. Registration is encouraged by not required.

Learn how to edit, crop, organize, and share images on your phone or tablet. Poudre River Public Library District is offering Photography and Photo Editing with Your Mobile Device, August 25 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm at Harmony Library.

Teens are invited to Nederland Community Library’s Escape Room, September 17 from 4:00 to 5:30. Using only their cunning and problem-solving abilities, teens will have to escape from a room built using BreakoutEDU materials.

Revisit the Great American Eclipse of 2017 with Eagle Valley Library District. On September 5 at 6:00 pm, photographer and naturalist Rick Spitzer will share pictures he took of the eclipse in Driggs, Idaho, and explain the planning that went into the project.

Small business owners are invited to Business and Breakfast, a free monthly series at Glenwood Springs Branch Library. The next meeting on Sept. 11 at 9:00 am features Trent Blizzard of BlizzardPress teaching Search Engine Optimization. Space is limited; be sure to register.

Libraries in the News

Pueblo Chieftain: Library’s Kid Parade successful in second run | Pueblo City-County Library District.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

National Book Festival

Melissa Carlson will represent the Colorado State Library at the 2018 Library of Congress National Book Festival on Sept. 1 in Washington, D.C. Follow the event via the hashtag #NatBookFest.

Learning Opportunities

CSL in Session, Getting Unstuck: The Secret Life of Procrastinators, with Jean Heilig & Christine Kreger.

  • Sept. 20, 2018, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
  • Free; no registration needed; join online

CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference

  • Oct. 12, 2018, 8:00 to 4:30
  • Arvada Center for the Arts & Humanities

View other upcoming learning opportunities for August 2018. For Colorado-specific events check the Library Learning & Creation Center.

Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC)

National History Day events will be starting soon. Give student researchers a leg up by pointing them towards the Plains to Peaks Collective — it contains over 46,000 historic objects from Colorado and Wyoming. Search the PPC collection in the Digital Public Library of America.

Colorado State Publications Library


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, August 17, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Please help us improve the Friday Grab Bag by taking a short survey about your experience. Your response is anonymous. Thank you for your feedback.

Now, let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Learn Something New

Join Jefferson County Public Library for their next call-in program, The American Cowboy with Active Minds, on September 24 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm. Listen from anywhere as they peel back the mythology, explain the Spanish Colony’s influence, and trace the development of the American Cowboy. To join, call 303-502-5189 or visit www.uberconference.com/jcplhomeservices. Or, to be called at the time of the program, pre-register at 303-275-6173.

“What about a Hook?” [Photo courtesy: Louisville Times, June 29, 1944. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]
Join foresters Ryan McNertney, Brian Slagle and Jon Morrissey on August 24 at Granby Library for Meet Your Forest: Where Have All the Beetles Gone? Their one-hour program on healthy forests will be followed by a 2.5 hour forest tour beginning at 10:00 am.

Local historians and published authors Dr. Sandra Mather, Bill Fountain, and Rick Hague will present an informational session on nonfiction research methods and processes, August 28 from 7:00 to 8:00 pm at Summit County Library’s South Branch.

Are you curious about learning more about bitcoin and similar online currencies? High Plains Library District is offering a friendly introduction during Cryptocurrency: What is it and how do I use it to buy a pizza? Join them on September 14 from 10:15 am to 12:15 pm at Centennial Park Library.

Libraries in the News

Congratulations to Elektra Greer, the new director of Nederland Community Library! The library announced the appointment in their August 2018 Newsletter.

The Lyons Recorder reported that Lyons Library Director Katherine Weadley will be leaving the library to join the Colorado Library Consortium (CLiC). Read Library Director Advancing to New Position.

Supporting Families

Lafayette Public Library is hosting Comfort Quilts, a monthly program where anyone can help create quilts that will be handed out to children in need by Lafayette fire and police officers. Even if you don’t sew you can still write encouraging words on a quilt square. The next meeting is September 8 from 1:00 to 5:00 pm.

Poudre River Public Library District’s latest blog post promotes their home school resources for students, families, and educators, including a brand-new home school resource portal. Learn even more at their Homeschool Fair on August 23 from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Old Town Library.

Arapahoe Libraries presents Dr. Dipesh Navsaria, nationally renowned pediatrician and early literacy advocate, August 29 at Smoky Hill Library and August 30 at Koelbel Library. His workshop, Prescription for Early Learning: Small Ways to Make a Big Impact, explores the role of reading in brain development. Reserve your spot.

Recycled Art

Bemis Public Library is hosting Altered Art, a teen craft class using repurposed objects, August 18 at 2:00 pm. The library will provide supplies and instruction. Registration required.

Lake County Public Library also invites participants to make art with re-purposed materials including old computers and other electronics. Join them this Saturday, August 18 at 9:00 am for Take Apart Make Some Art.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Celebrate the opening of the Colorado International Chinese Calligraphy Exhibit, which includes 70 pieces of art that capture the essence of the art and beauty of Chinese calligraphy and painting. The Aurora Public Library is hosting a reception on August 25 from 2:00 to 3:30 pm at the Central Library.

The tomato harvest is upon us! Pay your homage to this delectable fruit (or is it a vegetable?) by entering Delta County Libraries2018 Tomato Haiku Contest now through August 31.

Rampart Library District is hosting a Death Cafe on August 29 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm. The event is intended to create awareness about death and to help people make the most of their lives. Refreshments will be served.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Book Club Resource Survey

Does your library check out book club sets from the Colorado State Library? Please help us improve this service by answering this short survey. Thank you!

ALA Conference: STEM and Rural Libraries

ARSL President Kieran Hixon presented a poster session at the ALA Annual Conference on the challenges and opportunities of STEM in rural libraries. Read his reflections.

Learning Opportunities

CSL in Session, Getting Unstuck: The Secret Life of Procrastinators, with Jean Heilig & Christine Kreger.

  • Sept. 20, 2018, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
  • Free; no registration needed; join online

CLEL (Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy) Conference

  • Oct. 12, 2018, 8:00 to 4:30
  • Arvada Center for the Arts & Humanities

View other upcoming learning opportunities for August 2018. For Colorado-specific events check the Library Learning & Creation Center.

#GetToKnowCSL Wrap-Up

From March to June 2018 we ran #GetToKnowCSL, a social media campaign designed to put a human face on the Colorado State Library. We hope this campaign helped you feel more connected to the staff members who make this such a vibrant organization. All of the profiles are now available in in this wrap-up post.

Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC)

School is back in session, and soon students and teachers will be looking for primary sources for their research projects. Did you know that the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC) has over 46,000 digital objects (photos, oral history recordings, maps, etc.) available in the Digital Public Library of America? This free resource is great way to discover unique collections held by libraries and museums across the country—including Colorado and Wyoming! Search the DPLA.

Colorado State Publications Library


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
CSL News

#GetToKnowCSL

Who are the people of CSL?

The Colorado State Library is comprised of professionals and library lovers who partner with Colorado’s libraries, museums, and other cultural heritage organizations on topics that include resource sharing, staff development, literacy, leadership, and technology services. We are always seeking new ways to connect with you!

That’s why in spring 2018 we launched #GetToKnowCSL, a social media campaign designed to put a human face on our organization, both literally and figuratively. For four months, from March through June, we featured a different CSL staff member or team each week on our Twitter and Facebook pages using the hashtag #GetToKnowCSL. In addition to their photos, staff shared personal insights into what excites them about their job and/or the profession. What follows is a compilation of all the staff profiles published for this campaign.

Profiles are alphabetical by last name or team name, and not necessarily by the original order of publication.

Maddie Basch

Consultant Support Specialist
basch_m@cde.state.co.us

“My favorite part of my job is running the Book Club Resource! The State Library has almost 200 different titles with 5 or more copies of each that you can check out through your local library for book clubs, discussion groups, or classes. Some of our titles even have more than 10 copies! If that isn’t good enough news, we also have discussion questions for most of our book club books up on the Colorado Virtual Library website <https://s.lrs.org/146h>, so you can give your discussions an extra boost! I love getting to send out my favorite books and knowing that they’re not only going to be read, but that they’ll also inspire conversation. ‘Cause the only thing better than reading a good book, is talking about it with friends afterward!”

Mary Bills

Technical Coordinator
bills_m@cde.state.co.us

“I joined the Colorado State Library in early June of last year. Since arriving, I have had the continuing pleasure of working with an amazing group of people that really love libraries! I’ve also been able to work on some awesome projects, such as illustrating the Growing Readers Together Early Literacy Calendar. It was so much fun!

I love that everyday there is something new to work on and for me to learn. I also really love seeing how libraries impact their communities and spreading the joy that libraries bring.”

Miranda Doran-Myers

Research Assistant
Doran-Myers_M@cde.state.co.us

Miranda Doran-Myers

“As part of the Library Research Service team, I get to talk about library data with people from all around Colorado. My goal is to make data collection and analysis less intimidating than it often seems – I can relate, I never thought statistics would be such a big part of the job when I became a librarian!”

Babi Hammond

Digital Experience Consultant
hammond_b@cde.state.co.us

Babi wants to help libraries improve their user research and web design. He’s currently redesigning ColoradoVirtualLibrary.org using new CSS-grid layout tools. Despite being a tech guy, he still gets excited about books (especially if they’re about CSS).

Regan Harper

Director of Networking & Resource Sharing
harper_r@cde.state.co.us

“I have worked as a library professional in Colorado for 25 years and have had the pleasure to work with library folks from all types of libraries: public, academic, special, you name it. One of the things that excites me about our libraries is their tireless ability to re-define themselves and their vitality to their communities. Nothing slows them down or lessens their passion for providing outstanding service to anyone who needs it. In my role as Director for Networking and Resource Sharing, I have the privilege of helping Colorado library staff find more efficient ways of doing what they do through shared initiatives and technology solutions. I am proud of the crack squad of library consultants I lead and know that each of them is giving their all to the projects they support. What could be more rewarding than that.”

Amy Hitchner

Collaborative Programming Coordinator
ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org

“I’m fortunate to work on a variety of statewide initiatives, including the newly launched Plains to Peaks Collective and CSL Share & Learn regional professional development events. I love connecting Colorado libraries with each other and with State Library resources through social media and the Friday Grab Bag, a weekly roundup of interesting and innovative Colorado library news. I want Colorado library staff to know that the State Library is filled with compassionate, curious learners who want to hear from you!”

Kieran Hixon

Technology & Digital Initiatives Consultant
Hixon_k@cde.state.co.us

“I remember getting my first library card. It was bright orange and had raised lettering with my name and a long number. Once a week my mom would take me to the library. I would sit on a carpet square and listen to a lady read a book and then I would get to play with things like glue and popsicle sticks and cotton balls. I loved craft time…hmm…still do, actually. I think that is why I love the idea of Makerspaces in libraries.”

Institutional Library Development

Diane Walden
Walden_D@cde.state.co.us

Teresa Allen
Allen_T@cde.state.co.us

Erin Boyington
Boyington_e@cde.state.co.us

Renée Barnes
barnes_r@cde.state.co.us

“We serve the 18K people in Colorado state institutions, and believe that everyone deserves a great library – especially those facing significant barriers to service. For institutionalized persons, these barriers are not limited to geography; they also include learning disabilities, physical disabilities, mental illnesses, and social stigma. Learn more on our website <https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdelib/prisonlibraries/institutions>.”

Leigh Jeremias

Digital Collections Coordinator
ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org

“I’m passionate about Colorado’s history. I love that everyday there is a new historic tale to share. I love collaborating with libraries and museums to share their unique historic collections with their community far and wide. I’m amazed by the dedication Colorado cultural heritage organizations have to making their history available online.

Looking to learn more about the history of your community or even your family? Check out the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection or search the Plains to Peaks Collective, the Colorado & Wyoming Service Hub of the Digital Public Library of America. You never know what story you might uncover.”

Joyce Johnson

Growing Readers Together Coordinator
Johnson_Joyce@cde.state.co.us

Joyce Johnson coordinates Growing Readers Together, an early literacy initiative seeking to support informal family, friend & neighbor child care providers through outreach and resources provided by local public libraries across the state. As a social worker for over 30 years, she sees tremendous possibilities between community social work & librarianship, and is passionate about the role that community organizations play in supporting families.

Christine Kreger

Professional Development Consultant
Kreger_C@cde.state.co.us

Get to know CSL - Christine Kreger

“I love learning and I love Colorado library staff! As the Professional Development Consultant for the Colorado State Library, I get to learn, share, and collaborate with amazing Colorado library staff from across the state!  Looking for library related learning opportunities? Check out the Library Learning and Creation website and CSL in Session. What do you want to learn today?”

Debbi MacLeod

Director, Colorado Talking Book Library and Colorado State Publications Library
macleod_d@cde.state.co.us

“I love serving our Colorado Talking Book Library patrons and making a difference in people’s lives every single day. This is the most rewarding aspect of the job. I love wearing two hats which keeps away the boredom – there is always something new to accomplish.”

Pamela Mejia De Rodriguez

Formerly the Regional Early Literacy Specialist, Growing Readers Together

Pamela Mejia de Rodriguez

“One of the most important things I’ve learned through this job is that libraries are more than a community hub; libraries represent free and easy access to new learnings, new opportunities in life; they represent a second, a third or even a fourth chance in life.

The library is that one faithful friend that always has your back. Libraries can be whatever you need them to be. They can be an oasis: a place you can escape, refresh your mind and soul and recharge. They can be place to focus, concentrate and get something done, or a place where you can find the help you need for certain tasks in life. They can also be a place to play, to laugh, to sing, to dance, to draw, paint, create, build and have fun.

The library is a place that you can freely be yourself. The library is for me, you, them, us and for everybody!”

Christine Schein

Digital Literacy Instructional Specialist
schein_c@cde.state.co.us

Christine is passionate about digital literacy! She curates resources and learning tools to help you learn more about fake news, internet safety and privacy. Contact her to chat about your learning needs.

Lori Smith

SWIFT Coordinator
lsmith@coloradovirtuallibrary.org

“I love helping libraries expand their collections and support their users with resource sharing.

I worked at the library in college, and my favorite thing to do was helping with interlibrary loan. The generosity and willingness of libraries to share so openly with each other is invaluable and wonderful.”


We hope that the #GetToKnowCSL campaign helped you learn more about CSL staff and their professional passions and projects. We would love to hear from you, even (and especially) if it’s just to say hi and share what’s been going on at your library.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, July 27, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Sounds of Summer

Polish up those ruby slippers—Poudre River Public Library District is hosting a Wizard of Oz Sing-a-long, July 28 from 2:00 to 4:00 at Old Town Library. No musical talent required!

Join Bud Werner Memorial Library for an outdoor concert featuring San Diego-based mariachi band Jarabe Mexicano, July 30 at 12:00 pm on the library lawn. Bring a lunch and enjoy this energetic concert, which will include an opportunity for kids to make their own egg shaker maracas. Jarabe Mexicano will also perform at the Basalt Regional Library on July 27 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm.

The Delta/Grand Junction Women’s Choir will perform Grand Mesa A Cappella, a free concert at Delta Library on July 28 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm.

Garfield County Libraries is hosting an air guitar competition for tweens and teens ages 10-18, July 31 at 2:00 pm at the Rifle Branch Library. Teens are encouraged to strut their stuff in this epic competition of riffs, solos, and lip-syncing skills. Air guitars will be provided to the first 24 participants.

Montrose Regional Library District is celebrating their summer learning program with a Rockin’ Readers Concert. Enjoy music, food, games, and a photo booth on Friday, July 27 from 5:00 to 8:00 pm on the library’s east lawn.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

The Native Voices traveling exhibit is coming to the Ignacio Community Library. This interactive exhibition, developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine in partnership with ALA, examines concepts of health and medicine among contemporary American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawai’ians and features interviews with more than one hundred tribal leaders, healers, physicians, educators, and others. Attend the grand opening on Saturday, July 28 beginning at 1:00 pm.

In collaboration with the City of Thornton, Tri-County Health Department, Palizzi Farm and the American Heart Association, Anythink is now hosting a Farmer’s Market at their Huron Street branch every Tuesday through October 9. In addition to fresh food, the events will feature cooking demos and health and wellness information, as well as preventative health screenings on the second Tuesday of each month.

Join Attorney General Cynthia Coffman and AARP Foundation ElderWatch Colorado for 10 Scams Targeting Older Coloradans and How to Prevent Them, a program to be held at Mesa County Library’s Main Branch, July 31 at 1:00 pm. Register online.

Science & Technology

Broomfield Library is starting a new Code Club for kids ages 9-18, where they will learn to make games, animations, apps, or their own inventions. Join the launch party on August 22 from 4:00 to 5:30 at inventHQ. The group will meet every other Wednesday. Registration recommended.

The latest edition to the Elizabeth Library is a Weather Tech weather station. Patrons can monitor the humidity, wind speed and direction, rain amounts, barometer, etc. Future plans call for a second console so data can be posted on Weather Underground and the library’s webpage.

Weather Tech station at Elizabeth Library.

Curious about virtual reality and how it can be used for gaming, music, and exploring the world? Grand County Library District is offering the opportunity for tweens, teens, and adults to experience virtual reality on July 28 at Kremmling Library and July 29 at Hot Sulphur Springs Library. Sign up for a 25-minute slot that includes a tutorial and a chance to try some applications.

Pikes Peak Library District, in partnership with several other organizations, is putting on the 5th Annual Colorado Springs Mini Maker Faire on October 20. The event is a venue where engineers, artists, scientists, crafters, and other makers can showcase their hobbies, experiments, and projects. This year’s Mini Maker Faire will also include an art contest, Ars Technica. Registration is optional but encouraged.

Libraries in the Media

Red Feather Lakes Community Library was one of five public libraries to receive funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region (NNLM MCR) to develop creative public library health information outreach projects. Read about their project, which allowed participants to learn about food and its connection to healing chronic disease, living longer, and living better.

9News recently covered two items from Denver Public Library. On July 16 they published a story about Wheelie the Book Bike, a vehicle that visits outreach events. Then, on July 17, 9News visited the Park Hill Branch during the #Book4Tat event, when folks could upload their G-rated tattoos to DPL’s Facebook page and receive book recommendations from librarians. Nearly 200 tattoos photos were submitted over 72 hours. Read the story.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Learning Opportunities

Tackling Wicked Problems through Deliberative Engagement, with Martin Carcasson.

  • August 6 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
  • Loveland Public Library
  • Free; lunch provided
  • Register

CSL in Session: Create a Knock-out Collection in 60 Minutes a Week or Less, with Bob Bennhoff.

  • August 8, 2018 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm
  • Free! Join online

Digging into Assessment Data: Tips, Tricks, and Tools of the Trade, with Linda Hofschire and Lynn Silipigni Connaway.

  • August 14, 2018 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm
  • Free! Register to join online

Colorado Public Library Association (CoPLA) Mini Conference: Privacy and Intellectual Freedom in Libraries.

  • August 3, 2018 from 9:30 am to 4:00 pm
  • Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library (Denver)
  • CAL members: $30. Non-CAL members: $40.

View these and other learning opportunities at the Library Learning & Creation Center. The Wyoming State Library also maintains a professional development calendar. View offerings for July 2018.

Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC)

With school is just around the corner, teachers and students will be looking for primary sources, especially related to Colorado history. Did you know that the Plains to Peaks Collective (PPC) contains over 46,000 digital objects, including photographs, oral history recordings, postcards, yearbooks, pamphlets, quilts, clothing, and other cultural artifacts? Check out the PPC collection in the Digital Public Library of America.

Strategies for Coaching & Consulting

CSL’s Sharon Morris recently authored an article for the Global Family Research Project, Learning from Library Leaders: Strategies for Coaching and Consulting. In it she outlines the 5 principles that guide her team’s work with their constituents.

Colorado State Publications Library


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, April 27, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Express Yourself

Tweens and teens are invited to Poudre River Public Library District’s Friday Fandom Club: Dance, Dance, Dance. Armando Silva will be teaching hip hop and latin dance moves on April 27 from 4:00 to 5:30 at the Old Town Library.

Watch a teaser performance of the Mines Little Theater musical, The Addams Family, April 27 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm at the Arthur Lakes Library. This is the season finale of their Concerts in the Library series.

All readers are welcome to take part in a reading of Shakespeare’s All’s Well that Ends Well — no acting required! Anythink Huron Street is hosting Shakespeare Society: Pizza and a Play on May 1 and May 8 at 6:00 pm.

Join Boulder Public Library for their first all-ages storytime and sing-along, a new series that will occur the first Saturday of the month from 3:00 to 4:00 pm at the Reynolds Branch. The Saturday Singalong on May 5 will feature the songs of Bob Dylan.

Lamar Public Library is partnering with the Trailblazer Theatre Company to offer an acting workshop, May 12 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm.

Small Business Support

As part of their Small Business Series, Broomfield Library is partnering with SBDC and Access Broomfield Chamber to offer Building a Hardworking Website, May 23 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. This interactive session will help small business owners and nonprofits build and optimize their websites. Registration required.

Douglas County Libraries is hosting Business Start-Up Basics, April 30 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm at the Castle Rock branch. Participants will learn about the components of a profitable business, including financing and business plans. Register online.

FACTORY Lunch & Learn is a business series from Mesa County Libraries hosted at Factory Coworking. Join MCL and speaker Eric Payne of Venture Advocates on May 2 at 11:30 for What’s Your Business Worth?, a discussion of how to position your business for a maximum valuation. Registration is preferred.

Libraries in the News

CBS4 Denver reports that the City of Denver is trying to reach more small business owners by putting resources and services in Denver area libraries. Full story.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs has been cancelled due to low enrollment. We hope to see you at a future professional learning event.

Learning Opportunities

Registration will open on May 2 for Successful Supervision Workshops with Pat Wagner, June 19 & 20 in Rifle. Learn more.

CSL in Session, Face-to-Face: Creating Constructive Conversations within our Communities, with Rebecca Strein. 5/24/18, 12-1 pm. This webinar is free; no registration required.

Are you looking for professional learning events in Colorado? The Library Learning & Creation Center maintains a calendar of opportunities.

Growing Readers Together

Read the latest post from Growing Readers Together, The 5 Early Literacy Practices: Talk.

Colorado State Library Publications Blog

#GetToKnowCSL

Learn more about CSL staff in our weekly social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter. This week’s staff member is Babi Hammond, Digital Experience Consultant. Babi wants to help libraries improve their user research and web design. He’s currently redesigning ColoradoVirtualLibrary.org.


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, April 20, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Community Connections

Mesa County Libraries continues its Civil Discourse series with Understanding Civil Discourse and Political Correctness, April 25, 5:30 pm, at the Central Library. The series also includes the art exhibit Faces & Voices: Homeless in America, on display through May 10 in the Central Library entryway.

Dolores Public Library’s 4th Annual Cookbook Exchange is April 28 from 12:00 to 2:00 pm. Find some new recipes to spice up your cooking.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go! is Clearview Library District’s Bookmobile Day and Chili Cook-Off Event. Join the library’s bookmobile and the OverDrive Digital Bookmobile at Boardwalk Park in Windsor, May 5 from 12:00 to 2:00 pm, for an afternoon of chili tasting, face painting, magic tricks, balloon animals, and crafts.

Woodland Park Public Library is hosting a Death Cafe, April 25 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm. Community members are invited to participate in open discussions about death and making the most of life.

On April 12, Park County Public Library received a generous book donation from the Colorado Independent Publishers Association Education and Literacy Foundation (CIPA ELF). Librarians from each PCPL branch chose selections from CIPA’s vast inventory according to the needs of their respective communities.

Park County book donation
Participating in the April 12 CIPA ELF book donation to Park County Public Library were (from L-R) Bailey Librarians Michaela Dougherty and Ginny Pawlik, CIPA ELF President Mike Daniels, and Pat Shepard PCPL Manager. (Photo by Alex Telthorst)

Engaging Presentations

Colonel Tom Duhs USMC (retired) will present Skiing Off to War, the incredible story of the 10th Mountain Division, April 25 from 6:00 to 7:00 pm at Summit County’s South Branch Library.

CSU’s Extension Director will teach a Wildfire Preparedness Workshop at Ruby M. Sisson Memorial Library, April 26 from 5:00 to 6:30 pm. Participants will learn what they can do to minimize damage and loss in the event of a threatening wildfire.

Learn how to start and maintain a highly efficient backyard compost system. Melanie Nehls Burow, Master Composter, will teach the Spring Composting Workshop at Louisville Public Library, April 30 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm.

Join UNC University Libraries on April 23 at 4:15 pm in the Mari Michener Gallery for the launch of Woven Together Through Story, a book by the Greeley Young Authors project. The book features personal stories written by Greeley High School immigrant and refugee students. This presentation by the student authors is open to the public.

Kids & Teens

Moffat County Libraries is celebrating Children’s Book Week (April 30 – May 5) by encouraging kids to come to storytime on May 3 dressed as their favorite book character.

Bemis Public Library is hosting a Teen Poetry Zine Workshop, April 29 from 2:00 to 4:30 pm. Teens are invited to work on poetry or art for the library’s first annual poetry zine. Register online.

Libraries in the News

The Daily Sentinel reports that Mesa County Libraries is planning a community garden near the Central Library. The dirt lot will be developed into a community food plot, a children’s garden, and an area for educational programming.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs has been cancelled due to low enrollment. We hope to see you at a future professional learning event.

Online Primary Resources

Are you looking for primary source materials for students or researchers? Learn about resources available online such as those from the Colorado Department of Education and Digital Public Library of America.

Learning Opportunities

Registration will open on May 2 for Successful Supervision Workshops with Pat Wagner, June 19 & 20 in Rifle. Learn more.

Promising Practices: Leading from where you are: Leadership CAN be learned, with Becky Russell and Sharon Morris. April 24, 2018, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free; no registration required.

Are you looking for professional learning events in Colorado? The Library Learning & Creation Center has a calendar of opportunities.

New in CHNC: The Altrurian

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection welcomes its newest title The Altrurian, the newspaper of a turn-of-the-century cooperative community in Piñon (present-day Nucla). Access issues of this title from 1895-1901 for free through CHNC.

Book Club Resource

The Colorado State Library’s Book Club Resource recently added new social justice titles to inform, enlighten, and inspire your library’s reading group. Learn more.

Colorado State Library Publications Blog

#GetToKnowCSL

Learn more about CSL staff in our weekly social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter. This week’s staff member is Joyce Johnson, Growing Readers Together Coordinator. As a social worker for over 30 years, Joyce recognizes tremendous possibilities between community social work & librarianship.


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Digital Colorado

Hey Teachers – Amazing Primary Sources and Source Sets Available Online

Want to capture the attention and imagination of your students, and get them involved in history in an immersive way – explore incorporating primary sources into your curriculum.  Primary sources are the voices of the past. They are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They differ from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without firsthand experience.  Documents, letters, posters, film, artifacts, photographs, maps, etc. can all be primary sources that tell the story of people, places, and events of the past.

There are many online sites that share quality primary source materials and ready made primary source sets, the Colorado Department of Education being one of them.  Several years ago, 15 Colorado educators and digital collection professionals from the Denver Metro area got together to create a series of primary source sets aimed at K-6 teachers and students.  The results of this effort total more than 20 primary source sets, covering topics from the History of the American Bison to the Games and Toys of Yesteryear, and can be found on the CDE website at: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cosocialstudies/pssets.  The CDE primary source sets are comprised of three parts:   Lesson Overview, Primary Source Set and Lesson Ideas, and a Resource Set.  If you have not already seen these wonderful resources, check them out.  They may be just what you need to make a topic pop for your students.

Another great location for exciting primary source sets and their related primary sources is the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).  The DPLA is a free, national digital library that provides access to primary and secondary sources from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. The thousands of contributors to DPLA represent cultural institutions large and small, from the National Archives and the Smithsonian, to college and university special collections, to local historical societies, museums, and public libraries.  Libraries and museums in Colorado and Wyoming are contributing to this growing collection through the Plains to Peaks Collective Service Hub,  so our unique primary sources are available through the DPLA for your use as well.

The DPLA has created primary source sets that use primary sources to tell stories of national significance.  DPLA’s Primary Source Sets are specifically designed for use by teachers and students in middle school through college. DPLA has worked with a team of educators to design, create, and peer review more than 100 Primary Source Sets on topics in US History, American Literature, Art, and Science, which draw from the vast and diverse primary sources found in DPLA. Each Set includes an overview with background information, ten to fifteen primary sources, and a teaching guide with discussion questions, activities, and tools for primary source analysis. These “highlight reels” from DPLA are free, classroom-ready resources designed to save teachers and students time while offering instructional ideas intended to spark educator creativity.

DPLA also creates and makes available online exhibitions that offer in-depth explorations of important events and ideas in American history, such as the Race to the MoonJapanese Internment, the New DealAmerica during the Age of Imperialism, and Outsider Candidates in U.S. Presidential Elections. Pairing archival sources with contextual information, these exhibitions narrate the how and why of important historical moments and showcase the wealth of materials available for study.

There are other locations where expertly crafted primary source sets can be found including the Library of Congress and other national entities.  But, there are even more places where you can actually find primary sources to fashion your own teaching resources and tools.  Take your classroom to the next level by incorporating primary source materials into your teaching and help bring history alive.  Here are some great resources to start you on your primary source journey.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, April 6, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Fresh from the Garden

Bud Werner Memorial Library is teaming up the Routt County CSU Master Gardeners to present An Evening with the Master Gardeners, April 11 from 5:00 to 7:00 pm. During the event participants will experience hands-on demos and learn tips for gardening in Routt County.

To celebrate Arbor Day, Pines and Plains Libraries welcomes guest speaker Kari Hall from Double EL Soil at the Simla Branch Library, April 28 at 12:30 pm. The lecture will include a Q&A session and a light lunch.

Just in time for Mother’s Day, learn the basics of Flower Arranging at Avon Public Library, April 25 at 6:00 pm. All supplies will be provided; registration is required.

Always Learning

Pine River Library is hosting Conversational ASL (American Sign Language), a six-week course taught by San Juan Boces. The class meets each Thursday from April 19 – May 25 at 5:30 pm.

Learn Podcasting Basics at Denver Public Library’s Central Library, April 22 at 2:00 pm. DPL’s Podcaster in Residence Paul Karolyi will present what you need to know to produce a podcast, including equipment and software.

Global Issues

CU Boulder is hosting its 70th Annual Conference on World Affairs from April 9-13. The events held at Boulder Public Library will include 4 panel discussions and a film screening. See the full schedule of events.

Jefferson County Public Library continues its call-in series with North Korea with Active Minds, April 23 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm. Participants will learn about North Korean history and recent developments in nuclear weapons, international trade, and human rights. Join by phone at 303-502-5189 or by visiting uberconference.com/jcplhomeservices.

Libraries in the News

PPLD Chief Librarian and CEO John Spears authored a guest column in The Gazette: Pikes Peak Library District offers community multiple services.

National Library Week

National Library Week is April 8-14; this year’s theme is “Libraries Lead.” Many Colorado libraries are celebrating with special programs and fine forgiveness. Contact your library to see how they are participating in this annual event.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Longmont Public Library’s Yoga Storytime incorporates movement, stories, and songs – perfect for children ages 3+ and their caregivers. The class meets on Mondays from 11:00 to 11:45 am.

Did your library do an April Fools joke this year? Poudre River Public Library District surprised their patrons with a Facebook post announcing a new special collection of books designed specifically for left-handed readers. Check out their post and all the fun comments.

The Daniel Bennett Group will perform Jazz, Folk, Minimalism at Basalt Regional Library on April 6 at 5:30 pm. The Manhattan-based group is known for their “provocative mix of jazz, avant-pop, and surf rock.”


A Place for Jazz one-panel comic
“A Place for Jazz” [Photo courtesy Holy Cross Trail, September 26, 1925. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs has been cancelled due to low enrollment. We hope to see you at a future professional learning event.

One Book 4 Colorado

From April 9-23, all Colorado 4-year-olds can receive a free copy of the winning OB4CO title, to be announced next week. See a map of pick-up locations.

Learning Opportunities

CSL in Session | A Librarian’s Guide to Solo Leadership: How to lead when you don’t think you have anyone to lead, with Mandi Miller. April 12, 12:00 – 1:00 pm. Free; no registration required.

Registration is open for Successful Supervision Workshops with Pat Wagner, May 16 & 17 in Pueblo. Learn more. Registration for the workshop on June 19 & 20 in Rifle will open on May 2.

Each month, Wyoming State Library compiles a list of free learning opportunities. Check out the list for April 2018.

The Learning Edge Connection

The Learning Edge Connection is a new weekly series summarizing educator-focused professional learning opportunities, news, and resources. It’s written by Christine Schein, Digital Literacy Instructional Specialist. Please share it with other educators.

Library Development Annual Report 2017

Read what CSL’s Library Development team accomplished last year in their Annual Report 2017.

New CHNC Title

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection welcomes its newest title, The Oredigger, student newspaper of the Colorado School of Mines. Access 2,200 digitized pages spanning 1921-1936 for free through CHNC.

CLiC Springs Workshops – Pueblo

Are you headed to the CLiC Spring Workshops in Pueblo on April 19 & 20? While you’re there, check out a session presented by State Library staff.

Colorado ILL Conference

The Colorado ILL Conference is April 19 & 20 at CSU in Fort Collins, with a free Prospector preconference on April 18. Learn more and register.

Colorado State Library Publications Blog

#GetToKnowCSL

Learn more about CSL staff in our weekly social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter. This week’s staff member is Debbi MacLeod, Director of the Colorado Talking Book Library and State Publications Library. Debbi finds it rewarding to serve CTBL patrons and make a difference in their lives.


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, March 30, 2018

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.

Let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Fun & Games for Teens & Tweens

Poudre River Public Library District’s Old Town Library is hosting a Glow-in-the-Dark Teen Egg Hunt Party at Library Park, March 30 from 6:30 to 9:00 pm. This after-hours teen event also including gaming, movies, crafts, karaoke, snacks, dancing, and more.

Kids in grades 5+ are invited to learn the iconic role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons. Basalt Regional Library is hosting a session on April 2 from 4:30 to 7:00 pm. Registration required.

Building Communities

Bud Werner Memorial Library is seeking the community’s story submissions about public lands through midnight on April 2. The submissions will be part of GROUNDED, a live community multimedia storytelling event that will take place on May 17. Performance pieces should be 10 minutes or shorter.

Farr Regional Library invites you to join Muse: A Poetry Circle, April 25 at 7:00 pm. The group is for anyone who likes to perform, write, or listen to poetry in a nurturing environment.

Littleton Immigrant Resources Center will hold Intermediate Citizenship Classes at Sheridan Library on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, April 9 to June 18. This new class is in addition to the class held at Bemis Library on Mondays and Wednesdays. See more details and registration info.

Gardening

Montrose Regional Library’s weekly Gardening Seminar Series continues on April 3 with a discussion of climate as it affects gardening in the Uncompahgre Valley. The 8-week series runs through May 1.

Broomfield Library will host Growing by the Foot, April 5 from 6:00 to 7:00 pm. Learn how to grow vegetables and herbs in small spaces using the block-style method. All experience levels welcome; registration required.

Libraries in the News

The Daily Sentinel columnist LaReina Kalenian highlighted several inspirational creative writing programs at Mesa County Libraries.

The Post Independent reports that Amy Shipley has been named interim executive director of Garfield County Libraries during the search to replace former executive director Jesse Henning.

Readers Digest highlighted Basalt Regional Library in their story At These Libraries, You Can Check Out Seed Packets Alongside Books.

The Columbine Courier reports that Jefferson County Public Library is joining several other library systems in Colorado by eliminating overdue fines for children’s materials.

Pick ‘n’ Mix

Eagle Valley Library District announced their Lucky Day Collection—these hot new books and movies aren’t available for holds or renewals but can be checked out on a first come, first served basis. It might just be your lucky day to pick up the latest bestseller.


One-panel comic strips about books
“Didn’t Used [sic] Book Ends” [Photo courtesy Eagle Valley Enterprise, January 15, 1932. Accessed via Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.]

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

CSL Share & Learn: Glenwood Springs

Consultants from the State Library will be in Glenwood Springs on May 11 for CSL Share & Learn, a free event that combines professional learning with time to share with colleagues. CSL Share & Learn is appropriate for all types of library staff. Learn more and register.

*Note: The Walsenburg event originally scheduled for May 4 has been postponed.

CSL in Session

A Librarian’s Guide to Solo Leadership: How to lead when you don’t think you have anyone to lead, with Mandi Miller. April 12, 12:00 – 1:00 pm. Free; no registration required.

Workshop for Library Supervisors

Registration is opening soon for Successful Supervision Workshops with Pat Wagner, May 16 & 17 in Pueblo and June 19 & 20 in Rifle.

One Book 4 Colorado

OB4CO is right around the corner: from April 9-23 a copy of the same book will be given to all Colorado 4-year-olds. The winning title will be announced April 9!

CLiC Springs Workshops – Pueblo

Are you headed to the CLiC Spring Workshops in Pueblo on April 19 & 20? While you’re there, check out a session presented by State Library staff.

Colorado State Library Publications Blog

#GetToKnowCSL

Learn more about State Library staff in our #GetToKnowCSL social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter. This week’s staff member is Christine Kreger, Professional Development Consultant. Her recommended resources are the Library Learning & Creation Center and CSL in Session.

Get to know CSL - Christine Kreger


This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries. Do you have a story from your library to share? Email Amy Hitchner, ahitchner@coloradovirtuallibrary.org. Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.