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Great thing for social media

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

The standard chunk of Lorem Ipsum used since the 1500s is reproduced below for those interested. Sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 from “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” by Cicero are also reproduced in their exact original form, accompanied by English versions from the 1914 translation by H. Rackham.

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CVL-Collections

New CVL Post

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First post

Bacon ipsum dolor amet tri-tip prosciutto strip steak meatball chuck kielbasa. Beef tenderloin ball tip cow. Salami kielbasa sausage pork loin, boudin biltong jerky turducken chicken bresaola bacon buffalo. Leberkas alcatra doner sausage landjaeger pork belly swine boudin shank frankfurter ham chicken drumstick. Ribeye frankfurter capicola tri-tip meatloaf filet mignon. T-bone filet mignon tongue landjaeger. Leberkas short loin t-bone shoulder ground round, pork flank doner tail.

Doner pork loin tenderloin, pancetta pork belly bacon kielbasa frankfurter boudin. Ball tip chicken short loin porchetta prosciutto strip steak. Salami bresaola frankfurter short loin beef strip steak tail kielbasa cow cupim leberkas meatball tri-tip burgdoggen. Bacon short ribs turducken pig, andouille jerky filet mignon pork chop shank ball tip porchetta meatloaf shankle shoulder sirloin. Tongue biltong kevin ham shoulder flank turducken frankfurter landjaeger beef bacon doner.

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Website Creation & Hosting

Another Web Post

Lincoln Memorial statue by Daniel Chester French

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Another State Pubs Post

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.

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Website Creation & Hosting

New Website Post

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

The standard chunk of Lorem Ipsum used since the 1500s is reproduced below for those interested. Sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 from “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” by Cicero are also reproduced in their exact original form, accompanied by English versions from the 1914 translation by H. Rackham.

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

New State Pubs Post

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

The standard chunk of Lorem Ipsum used since the 1500s is reproduced below for those interested. Sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 from “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” by Cicero are also reproduced in their exact original form, accompanied by English versions from the 1914 translation by H. Rackham.

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CSL News

OMG–another post!

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Still another new post

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Yet Another New Post

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Another New Post

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A New Post

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The Colorado Extension

In 1914 the Federal government passed the Smith-Lever Act, which established a system of Cooperative Extensions at American land grant universities, including the Colorado Agricultural College (today’s Colorado State University). Extensions were set up to provide rural and agricultural communities with classes, clubs, demonstrations, and publications to help them learn about farm, garden, and home economics practices. To introduce Coloradans to the program, the Colorado Agricultural College and the U.S. Department of Agriculture produced the publication The Smith-Lever Act and What It Provides for Colorado Farmers and Housekeepers, which you can read online from our library.

Ten years after the Act, the university published Agricultural Extension in Colorado: A Record in Word and Picturealso available to view online from our library. This commemorative publication describes the purpose, activities, and successes of Colorado’s Extension, and is full of great photos of farm and rural life in Colorado in the ‘teens and ‘twenties.

Colorado’s extension work had actually preceded the Smith-Lever Act. In 1912, the Colorado Agricultural College sponsored the office of the “State Leader of Farm Management Field Studies and Demonstration for Colorado.” Logan County was the first Colorado county to appoint an extension agent that year, and several others followed over the next two years. Then, in 1914, after the Federal law went into effect, Colorado’s Extension became official through an agreement between the College and the U.S. government. For more on the history of the establishment of the Extension in Colorado, including legislation, see this section from the CSU Extension’s staff handbook. The Extension has also produced a short video on their history.

Since its founding, the Extension has produced hundreds of bulletins and fact sheets on a wide variety of topics. CSU’s Extension is still going strong today, with county extension offices, classes, volunteer programs like the Colorado Master Gardener Program and Planttalk, and much more, in addition to their publications. To learn about their work and how to get involved, visit the CSU Extenison’s website. To read Extension publications from a century ago to the present, search our library’s digital repository.

Inside the Weld County Extension Office, showing the many publications offered, 1924.
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CSL News Resource Sharing

Friday Grab Bag, February 15, 2019

The Friday Grab Bag is a weekly series that highlights fun, unique, and interesting happenings in Colorado libraries, and includes news from the Colorado State Library.  So get up from your desk, have a stretch, and let’s open the Friday Grab Bag!

Attention Worthy:

Small Business Revolution:  Canon City, Colorado is competing to be in a reality show called Small Business Revolution. The Canon City Library is heavily involved. They are the only Colorado town represented and have made it to the top 6. Now the winning city will be determined by who has the most votes from the public.  The winning city will get $500,000 for 6 main street businesses. The recipients will have access to marketing advice, business makeovers, as well as the reality show coming to Canon City, even non-profits can compete for the money! This could really help out the Canon City Library. Every vote counts and could help the Canon City area.  If you have the time and inclination, you can vote at – www.votecanoncity.com

CALCON Needs You:  CALCON2019 is starting to ramp up and they need you!  The deadline for submitting proposals is looming – March 1st.  Presenting at CALCON is a great experience and something anyone can do.  Why not take the plunge and give it a try.  Learn more here:  Deadline for CALCON Session Proposals is Coming Soon!

Also – once those program proposals come in – someone need to review them – and that is where CALCON needs you again.  They are looking for volunteers to reveiw proposals.  Share your knowledge, expertise and curiosity with others within the library profession in Colorado.  Get involved.  For more information, click here:  Call for Program Review Volunteers (CALCON)

Mancos Fun Run:  The Mancos Public Library is gearing up for the 6th Annual Mancos Cowboy Half Marathon, 5K and Fun Run on Saturday, June 22. This has turned into a really fun community event and fundraiser for us.Our race courses are beautiful and we get participants from 8-80. Last year was our biggest yet with 176 registered runners and walkers. We raised about $13,000 through sponsorships, donations, and registration fees. This event makes a great destination race as Mancos is located just five miles from Mesa Verde National Park and 30 miles from Durango.For the second year, we will have a team competition in the 5K — maybe we could get some library rivalries happening!Our race website is: http://mancoshalfmarathon.com

Going Fine Free:

  • Clear Creek County Library District:  In order to provide fair access to materials and to promote literacy in our communities, the Clear Creek County Library District is no longer charging fines for overdue reading materials, and all existing fines for overdue reading materials have been erased.

Grant/ Assistance Funding Opportunities:

Native American Library Services Basic Grants program:  Recently, IMLS announced an April 1 deadline for applications for the Native American Library Services Basic Grants program. Basic grants support existing tribal library operations and help maintain core library services. All federally recognized tribes and Alaskan Native villages and corporations with libraries are eligible and welcome to apply. Last year, IMLS awarded over 180 basic grants. They’ve put together a new list of tips to help you submit a successful application package this year—here’s what you need to know.  Read More.

CLIR recently opened our 2019 call for proposals for our Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives program.  Click for further details.

CHNC New Content Support Program:  

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce that the 2019 program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC is now open for applications.  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations across our state increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC.

Libraries Making News:

Pikes Peak Library District:

Learning for Everyone:

Citizen Science Day 2019: Add Real Scientific Research to Your Library Programming! – February 20, 3:00-4:00 PM CT – Citizen Science Day 2019 is Saturday, April 13th. You and your library are invited to participate in the Stall Catchers Megathon, in which people all over the world will analyze real research data in a game format that would normally take researchers over a year to complete. Join PSR for this webinar to learn more about Citizen Science (real people doing real science), and see how your library can get on board through citizen science activities and programming at different levels.

The Elephant in the Room: Helping Your Community Navigate the Financial Aspects of Healthcare – February 21, 2:00-3:00 PM CT – Financial health literacy occurs at the intersection of managing personal finances and health literacy. This hour-long webinar with GMR will explore the four components of financial health literacy and how librarians can support education and awareness to empower health consumers as they navigate complex issues of terminology, insurance, unexpected costs and financial barriers to healthcare. Better understanding the financial aspects of healthcare provides one key to unlocking health equity and wellness.

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – March 18, 12:00-1:00 PM CT – Sponsored by MAR, this class is designed to assist librarians, public health workers, health professionals, and the general public in locating authoritative information on nutrition and topics relating to nutrition. Background information on the importance of nutrition information to other health-related topics will be included, and resources for locating nutrition-related statistics and evidence-based practice will also be identified.

PubMed for Librarians: Introduction to PubMed – March 26, 1:00-2:30 PM CT – Attend this class to learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings.

CSL In Session:

  • Tear Down This Wall: Find & Remove Barriers to Library Use:  February 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – While your library is ADA compliant and welcomes all, there may be hidden barriers for some in your community that hinder them from using your library.  Join us for this interactive session to discuss how to find out who isn’t coming to your library and why, and talk through strategies for breaking down road blocks that some members of your community have to enable them to become more active library patrons.
  • Helping Patrons with Legal Questions: Part 1 – Legal Research Basics:  February 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm – This first webinar in a series of three presented by the Colorado Association of Law Libraries and the Colorado State Library will address aspects of providing legal research services to patrons.  In this session, attendees will learn the following: what are the basic concepts involved in legal research; how to conduct a legal reference interview; and where to refer patrons in order to find forms and legal clinics.  This session will provide attendees with a basic overview of these concepts.  Sessions two and three will delve more into where to locate free legal research resources.

CLiC Spring Workshops:  The CLiC Spring Workshops are just around the corner and registration is open now.   The dates and locations for 2019 are: Grand Junction: March 21 & 22 @ Colorado Mesa University Fort Morgan: March 29 @ Fort Morgan High School Pueblo: April 15 & 16 @ CSU-Pueblo

Weekly Vocabulary Word:

This week’s word comes from the third century Ancient Greek.  You’ve met them, you’ve dined with them, perhaps you are one.  Deipnosophist – a person skilled in the art of dining and dinner-table conversation.  Having one of these around certainly takes the pressure off of the rest of us during meal times.  So – all hail the deipnosphist. We thank you for your gift.

What’s New at the Colorado State Library

Summer Reading/Summer Learning:  The Colorado State Library has once again renewed their support for ReadingRecord summer reading tracking software!  ReadingRecord is a web-based application for libraries to track reading program participants. It is a cloud (hosted) service, meaning that no additional equipment is required to use ReadingRecord. It can be used to track most any kind of reading program: traditional summer reading programs, winter reading programs, 1,000 books before kindergarten programs, year-long programs, etc.

Helping make history more accessible:  The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is not just a spectator sport – you can help make history brighter and more accessible by getting involved.  Make your connection to history deeper by becoming a text corrector in the CHNC database.  It is easy, effective, rewarding, and really addictive.  Learn more about OCR correction and how you can participate here.

Library Related Employment:

Are you thinking of making a change this year in your job?  Check out Library Jobline for hot new library employment opportunities.

Have a great weekend everyone! This post is part of the Spotlight on Sharing initiative, which aims to increase the visibility of resource sharing in Colorado libraries.   Whats going on at your library?  Let us know what you want to share!  Email Regan Harper, harper_r@cde.state.co.us.  Also, be sure to follow Colorado State Library on Twitter and Facebook.

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CSL News

Call for Program Review Volunteers (CALCON)

We are approaching the deadline for CALCON 2019 program submission(MARCH 1st – no extensions this year!) 

We need program reviewers, the more the merrier!  The CALCON planning committee voted to arrange the programs for review by topic.  The submissions will be divided up into 5 review groups of 30 – 35 proposals each.  Most proposals are 1 to 2 pages each.  Reviewers will be given access to an online rubric that will be filled out for each submission.  This paperless process will need to be done from March 4 to March 22 in the comfort of your own space.

If you are able, please take a moment to volunteer.  It’s ok if you are submitting a session, we will just put you into a different evaluation group.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Amber Cox and Tiah Frankish: Program Committee Co-Chairs

We would also like to request that each association, division, and interest group have a voice at the table when we are selecting the final program on March 26th at the Adams 12 Educational Services Center.  It is a full day commitment. 9 to 4.

What we need from you:  Please send us the name of the one person from your association, division or interest group that will be attending the program selection day on March 26th.

Amber Cox and Tiah Frankish: Program Committee Co-Chairs

Categories
CSL News

Celebrate Teen Health Week, April 1-7, 2019

Friday, February 15, 2019 4:53 PM Celebrate Teen Health Week, April 1-7, 2019.  Here’s how you can support the physical and mental health of young people:

Join the Movement – 

Spread the word – 

  • Use these Sample Tweets:
  • Youth are the future! Spread the word about #TeenHealthWeek2019 in April and join us in improving the future of adolescent health! #TeenHealth #TAG42Mil
  • Join us this April for Teen Health Week! Check out the Adolescent Health: Think, Act, Grow® (TAG) Playbook, and learn more about how schools, clinics, and communities can foster healthy young people! @teenhealthweek #TAG42Mil

Be informed – 

  • Who are America’s Adolescents? Get the latest facts and figures about adolescents and their health at state and national levels. Find information on changing demographics and how adolescents spend their time.
  • Adolescent Health: Think, Act, Grow® (TAG) is a national call to action for organizations and individuals to prioritize activities that improve the health of America’s 42 million adolescents. You can make a difference by taking action – check out these resources to learn more about the recommended action steps and resources.

Share how you are observing Teen Health Week by completing the event form here and using #TeenHealth, #TAG42Mil, #TeenHealthWeek2019, and @teenhealthweek.

Categories
CSL News

Tips for Applying for a Native American Library Services Basic Grant

For more than twenty years, the Institute of Museum and Library Services has provided grants to tribal communities throughout the United States. Over the past ten years alone, IMLS made awards to more than 350 tribes and indigenous organizations in 33 states, including over 70 each in Alaska and California, 34 in Oklahoma, 24 in Washington, 19 in New Mexico, 15 in Arizona, 12 in Michigan, 7 in Minnesota, 7 in Montana, and 5 each in South Dakota and Utah.

Recently, IMLS announced an April 1 deadline for applications for the Native American Library Services Basic Grants program. Basic grants support existing tribal library operations and help maintain core library services. All federally recognized tribes and Alaskan Native villages and corporations with libraries are eligible and welcome to apply. Last year, IMLS awarded over 180 basic grants. They’ve put together a new list of tips to help you submit a successful application package this year—here’s what you need to know.

Changes in Basic Grants:  This year, basic grants now range from $6,000-$10,000. Only up to $3,000 of your total budget can be used for education/assessment activities. These activities include conference presentations and attendance, continuing education and training, and hiring consultants. However, you’re not required to include education/assessment activities. If you would like to use all $10,000 for salaries, books, or other library-related budget items, that’s both allowable and appropriate! Please see the Notice of Funding Opportunity for more details.

Tips for a Successful Application: Please include all the required documents in your application package. We don’t want your application to be rejected because you forgot the SF-424S, the program information sheet, the library services plan, the budget, or the digital product form, if you need one. Here are a few tips to help you complete all the forms correctly:

  • Applicants must use the IMLS budget form, found in the Notice of Funding Opportunity.
  • digital product form is required if digital products like websites, apps, datasets, and other digital content, tools, and resources are created with IMLS funds.
  • All applicants must address performance measures. Please join us for a webinar about performance measures on Wednesday, February 20, from 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. ET to learn more.
  • Reminder: we can accept PDFs only. We cannot accept Word documents. Make sure all of your required application components are PDFs.
  • Make sure your budget items match what is described in your library services plan. Also, provide a separate description in your plan for education/assessment activities, if applicable.

Using Grants.gov All applicants are required to use Workspace on Grants.gov. Here are a few resources to help you get started:

A few tips:

  • Register early for a D-U-N-S® number, register with the System of Award Management (SAM) at sam.gov, and create a Grants.gov account.
  • Make sure you don’t have any delinquent reports to federal agencies, since you will be ineligible to receive an award if this is the case. If you’re not sure of your status, please get in touch with us, and we can help you find out.

Getting Help:

IMLS is here to help! Please read the current Notice of Funding Opportunity and reach out if you have any questions. Our webinars are great refreshers for applicants who have not submitted a proposal for several years, as well as new applicants who are unfamiliar with the application process.

  • If you can’t join us for a live webinar, you can view webinars on-demand. If you’re unsure if a cost is allowable or if you are not sure about what to include in your plan, we can talk with you and give you feedback on your ideas before you submit.
  • For questions about eligibility, your library services plan and project activities, the digital product form, or your budget, including allowability of costs, contact:
  • Sandra Toro, Ph.D., Senior Program Officer, storo@imls.gov, 202-653-4662
  • For questions about application requirements and deadlines, contact:
  • Sarah Boonie, Program Specialist, sboonie@imls.gov, 202-653-4761 or
  • Chelsea Cole, Program Specialist, ccole@imls.gov, 202-653-4719

Click here to read this email online.

Categories
Lifelong Literacy

State Library Renews Support for ReadingRecord Summer Reading Tracking Software

The Colorado State Library has once again renewed their support for ReadingRecord summer reading tracking software!  ReadingRecord is a web-based application for libraries to track reading program participants. It is a cloud (hosted) service, meaning that no additional equipment is required to use ReadingRecord. It can be used to track most any kind of reading program: traditional summer reading programs, winter reading programs, 1,000 books before kindergarten programs, year-long programs, etc.

  • Colorado libraries WITHOUT dedicated IT staff can use ReadingRecord free of charge to track reading program participation, including 1,000 books before Kindergarten. This offer is limited to the first 20 libraries to sign-up, so get your request in soon.
  • Colorado libraries WITH dedicated IT staff can get $50 off the regular price of $150/year to track reading program participation, also including 1,000 books before Kindergarten. There is no limit to the number of libraries that can take advantage of this offer.

Many thanks to Beth Crist at the Colorado State Library for making this happen!

Please note: ReadingRecord is available as a hosted service to all libraries, not just those in Colorado.  It has been used across the United States and Canada to register over 947,000 readers and track more than 1.6 million completed levels for reading programs of all kinds at libraries of all sizes.  For more information about ReadingRecord, please see the Wiki at http://www.readingrecord.net.

A new feature has also been added: ReadingRecord can track which prize / task / etc. was selected for a level.  For more details check out the newly-updated demo site here:  https://www.readingrecord.net/dokuwiki/doku.php/info:demo_site_info . Thanks to Carlen DeThorne at the Grayslake Area Public Library in Illinois for being the guinea pig.

Categories
Learning

Deadline for CALCON Session Proposals is Coming Soon!

Colorado Association of Libraries Presenting is great for professional development, helping to build strengths in interpersonal communication, presentation skills, and more. But even beyond that, it’s an opportunity to share experiences, tips and techniques with colleagues across the state. So whether you’ve never presented, or it’s your 5th time, think about the awesome things you’ve accomplished this past year and shape it into a CALCON 2019 Program Submission!

To help you gear up for your proposal submission, be sure to check out this video made in collaboration with the Colorado State Library, Taking Your CALCON Session to the Next Level.

Help us ignite the magic at CALCON19 by submitting your presentation proposal! Deadline is March 1st, 2019 THERE WILL BE NO EXTENSIONS!!!

CALCON 2019

September 19-21, 2019

Loveland, CO

Categories
Book Club Resource

Celebrating Black Voices with the Book Club Resource

The Colorado State Library would like to invite everyone to celebrate Black History Month with our newly updated Book Club Resource! Over the past year, we have refocused our energy toward making our book club collection more diverse and inclusive, so that readers from all cultures and backgrounds can find stories for them written by someone like them. This Black History Month, we are proud to highlight some of our favorite black voices as we remember the struggles of the past and work toward a more equitable future.

 

Citizen: An American Lyric
by Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine’s bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named “post-race” society.

 

The Underground Railroad
by Colson Whitehead

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned—Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

Like the protagonist of Gulliver’s Travels, Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey—hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre–Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.

 

March: Book 1
by John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper’s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

 

The Origins of Others
by Toni Morrison

America’s foremost novelist reflects on the themes that preoccupy her work and increasingly dominate national and world politics: race, fear, borders, the mass movement of peoples, the desire for belonging. What is race and why does it matter? What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid?

Drawing on her Norton Lectures, Toni Morrison takes up these and other vital questions bearing on identity in The Origin of Others. In her search for answers, the novelist considers her own memories as well as history, politics, and especially literature. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and Camara Laye are among the authors she examines. Readers of Morrison’s fiction will welcome her discussions of some of her most celebrated books―BelovedParadise, and A Mercy.

If we learn racism by example, then literature plays an important part in the history of race in America, both negatively and positively. Morrison writes about nineteenth-century literary efforts to romance slavery, contrasting them with the scientific racism of Samuel Cartwright and the banal diaries of the plantation overseer and slaveholder Thomas Thistlewood. She looks at configurations of blackness, notions of racial purity, and the ways in which literature employs skin color to reveal character or drive narrative. Expanding the scope of her concern, she also addresses globalization and the mass movement of peoples in this century. National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates provides a foreword to Morrison’s most personal work of nonfiction to date.

 

The Coldest Winter Ever
by Sister Souljah

During one of New York’s worst snow storms, Winter is born to Ricky Santiaga and his wife. At the age of sixteen, Winter is well-accustomed to a life of decadence provided by her notorious father who commands an intricate family web of drug dealers in their Brooklyn ghetto. As familiar as she is with riches, she is also acutely aware of the devastation of urban poverty to which she is determined never to succumb.

Her father’s decision to move his family to Dix Hills, an affluent Long Island suburb, creates unimaginable consequences. Winter is left alone to find her way precariously through the shifting maze of power, sex, money, and drugs, determined to vindicate her father and rise above the laws, social welfare system, poverty, and dangers that surround her.

Author Sister Souljah, a political activist, is a part of this story as a constant voice through all of Winter’s struggles. Winter hears Souljah’s voice intermittently on the radio and lives with her briefly while in pursuit of her own dubious ambitions. Souljah’s pleas to the young black women she works with to realize their dignity, beauty, and inner power fail to find a place to rest in Winter’s driven spirit.

The Coldest Winter Ever is a fast-moving, impeccably brilliant account of choices and consequences within the urban hip-hop culture. Sister Souljah writes eloquently with expressive insights and language of youth. Amidst the crisis and cruelty of inner city poverty and seemingly insurmountable struggles, Sister Souljah’s voice is one of grace and unmistakable clarity in one young woman’s coming-of-age story.

 

Celebrate black history all year long by checking out these and many other great titles from the Colorado State Library’s Book Club Resource!

(All book descriptions taken from Amazon.com)