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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Victory Gardens

Victory gardens were a part of life on the home front during World War II. While farmers were encouraged to increase production to help feed the hungry soldiers, those living in urban and suburban areas were also encouraged to help the war effort by growing as much of their own food as possible. Eleanor Roosevelt even planted a victory garden on the White House lawn.

Many people who planted victory gardens were not experienced gardeners, or had only had small gardens before the war. So here in Colorado the Colorado State College (now Colorado State University) published a number of resources to help gardeners and small-size farmers learn the basics of home food production. Many of their publications focused on avoiding problems, such as diseases, which if controlled could lead to higher yield. One such publication, issued by the college’s Experiment Station, was Psyllid Control on Potatoes and Tomatoes in the Victory Garden. Other wartime Colorado State College publications included Increasing Home Vegetable Gardening and Starting Vegetable Plants.

The College’s Colorado Farm Victory Program published a series of brochures which included such titles as Alfalfa in Colorado; Diseases of Cucumber and Melons and Their Control; Concrete Tile for Sub-Irrigated Gardens; and Irrigation for Maximum Production.  Farm Victory Program brochures also focused on home food storage to reduce waste. Some of these titles include Drying Fruits and Vegetables; Home Storage of Fruits and Vegetables; Preservation of Meat, Poultry and Fish by Freezing; Home Canning of Vegetables in a Pressure Cooker; Clean Milk and Cream: How to Produce Them; and even Pest Control on the Home Front. Search our library’s online catalog for more Farm Victory Program brochures and other titles.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Denver's Trees

Friday, April 27 is Arbor Day, a day for encouraging the planting of trees and celebrating their importance.  Today, Arbor Day is somewhat overlooked, being mostly supplanted by Earth Day. But a century ago, Arbor Day was a pretty big deal.
During the early decades of the 20th century, urban areas around the nation were swept up in the City Beautiful Movement, a movement to enhance cities by adding parks, parkways, and monumental, neoclassical civic architecture inspired by the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. In Denver, Mayor Robert Speer was one of the movement’s strongest advocates. On Arbor Day, Mayor Speer would give away thousands of free trees, and schoolchildren would plant trees in Denver’s City Park.

Denverites wait in line to receive their free trees on Arbor Day, 1912. 18,000 trees were given away that day. Photo from Denver Municipal Facts, v.4 n.17, 1912.
Among the most popular trees in Denver were American elm, ash, locust, maple, and birch, according to The Shade Trees of Denver, a 1905 publication from the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station that has been digitized and made available online from our library.  This publication includes tips for planting trees and discussion of the various types and how well they grow in Colorado.  The best part, however, is the series of plates at the end of the book, illustrating the various tree types in Denver.  Examples are shown from parks as well as from the grounds of some of Denver’s large estates:
Ash trees in City Park
Hackberry tree in Fairmount Cemetery
Sycamore tree on the grounds of the Kountze Mansion at 16th and Grant
For other resources about growing trees in Colorado, search our library’s online catalog.  Also, for a look at how Arbor Day was celebrated in the public schools, see the Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Arbor Day books from 1908, 1911, and 1912, available online from our library.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Call 811 Before Digging

Gov. Hickenlooper has proclaimed April 2018 as “Dig Safely Month in Colorado.”  The Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) reminds property owners and contractors to call 811 at least three days before any digging project. You can also submit a request online. Upon receiving the request, local utility companies will be dispatched to the property to mark underground utility lines. “Every nine minutes an underground utility line is damaged because someone decided to dig without first contacting 811.  Striking a single utility line can cause injury, repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages,” says the PUC.  “Installing a mailbox, building a deck, and planting a tree or garden are all examples of digging projects that should only begin after contacting 811.”  The service is free.  Go to colorado811.org/  or view the Colorado 811 procedures guide for more information.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Rydberg's Flora

One of late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century America’s greatest botanists extensively studied the flora of Colorado, and left us what is still one of the most important works on the state’s flowers.

Per Axel Rydberg (1860-1931) emigrated to the United States from Sweden in 1882.  His career as a botanist came somewhat by accident.  Upon moving to the United States, he planned to become a mining engineer, but while working in the iron mines of Michigan he suffered a serious leg injury that left him with a lifelong limp and closed the door on a mining career.  Instead, he turned to intellectual pursuits, paying his way through the University of Nebraska by teaching mathematics.  After receiving his M.A. Rydberg was hired by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to study the botany of Nebraska and South Dakota, publishing his first work in 1895.  He then when on to earn his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1898, and two years later, Rydberg first came to Colorado to study the state’s flora.  Over the next three decades of his life Rydberg would specialize in studying the flora of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains, discovering several plant species and publishing numerous works.  He also continued his connection to New York, serving as the first curator of the New York Botanical Garden Herbarium. 

Rydberg’s publications include studies of the botany of Nebraska, Utah, Yellowstone National Park, and even the Yukon, but one of his most significant publications remains his 1906 Flora of Colorado, published by the Colorado Agricultural College’s Experiment Station.  This nearly-500 page book has been digitized and is available online from our library.

Also from our library you can learn about some of the plants and flowers that Rydberg studied and discovered, which bear his name.  Some of these species are now rare or imperiled.  You can read conservation assessments from the Colorado State University’s Natural Heritage Program on the following species named for Rydberg:

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Butterfly Migration

If you love butterflies, this week has been an absolute delight along the Front Range as the painted lady butterflies migrate south.  Conditions this year have caused an explosion of the numbers of painted ladies, which is why we are seeing so many more than usual.  The orange butterflies, which are commonly mistaken for monarchs, are headed to Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico for the winter, according to an article in the Denver Post.  They enjoy a variety of flowers, especially asters, which are in bloom right now.  Last weekend was the peak for the migration through the Denver area, although many can still be seen.  The butterflies will also pass through on their way back north in April and May.

Colorado has many other butterfly species, as well.  Those who enjoy butterflies should see the CSU Extension’s publication Attracting Butterflies to the Garden, which offers tips on creating a butterfly habitat along with lists of the best types of flowers to plant for attracting butterflies.

Painted lady (Vanessa cardui) butterflies enjoying the asters at my home in Park Hill, September 16, 2017.
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Colorado State Publications Blog

Japanese Beetles

While gardening last weekend I discovered that my trees are being eaten by Japanese beetles; since then, I’ve spotted them in other parts of town, as well.  Biologists say that 2017 is the worst year yet in Colorado for the invasive pests, which up until a few years ago were only found east of the Mississippi.  According to the Denver Post, Japanese beetles have been munching their way up and down the Front Range from Boulder to Pueblo.  The Colorado Department of Agriculture issued a quarantine against the Japanese beetle in 2010, but the spread has continued.

Experts say that Japanese beetles, which are most active in July and August, feed on the leaves of over 300 species of plants, but their favorites are beans, linden trees, and rosebushes.  So what can you do to prevent and control Japanese beetles?  Colorado State University entomologist Whitney Cranshaw wrote a helpful fact sheet that describes identification of the beetle as well as techniques and recommended products for control.  Also see the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s Japanese Beetle Best Management Strategies and their powerpoint presentation about Japanese beetle.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Caring for Storm-Damaged Trees

Spring snowstorms and freezes like those experienced in Denver metro area this weekend can cause significant tree damage, due to the cold in combination with the weight of the snow on trees that have already leafed out.  If you experienced tree damage this weekend, the Colorado State University Extension and Colorado State Forest Service have several publications that offer helpful tips on caring for storm-damaged trees, and how to prevent damage before a storm:

Photo courtesy Colorado State Forest Service

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Spring is Here!

Hooray, today is the first day of Spring!  Are you interested in learning about the plants and animals that Colorado springtime brings?  Our library has many resources that you can use to learn — or teach your kids — about springtime in Colorado.

Hearken!  It’s Spring is a publication from the Colorado Division of Wildlife.  This title from their “Colorado’s Wildlife Company” series is written for all ages, with fun facts and illustrations about Colorado wildlife.  Search our library’s web catalog to find more titles from Colorado’s Wildlife Company.

Planning a flower garden this spring?  Check out Spring-Planted Bulbs, Corms and Roots to learn about the best bulbs for growing in Colorado.  This is only one of hundreds of resources on Colorado gardening available from our library; search our web catalog for more titles.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Gardening with Native Plants

Spring is coming, and as you begin planning your yard and garden, consider the benefits of using native plants.  Native plant species are a good choice because they are adapted to Colorado’s climate and soil, so can be easy to grow here in Colorado.  Native plants are also good for water conservation, as they are adapted to growing in Colorado’s arid climate.  Finally, native plants attract local pollinators (bees, birds, butterflies), which are essential to plant reproduction.

Many varieties of penstemon, including the Rocky Mountain penstemon shown here, are native to Colorado. Photo courtesy Colorado State University Extension.

Our library offers a number of resources that you may find helpful if you choose to grow native plants, including

Also, for information on pollinators, see

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Garden Pests

If you’re experiencing some unwelcome visitors in your yard or garden, you can use information found in our library collection to help you identify and eradicate pests.  This article will help you find resources by plant type or pest type.  Titles that do not have links can be checked out in hard copy from our library.  As always, you can search for more resources in our library catalog.

General Resources

Beneficial Insects and Other ArthropodsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

BiocontrolColorado Department of Agriculture, 2009-   .  See also Biocontrol Webpage.

Buying and Selling Pesticides OnlineColorado State University, Colorado Environmental Pesticide Education Program, 2006.

Colorado Pesticide Guide.  Vegetable Crops.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1997.

Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS) Annual Report, Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2005-

Economic Considerations of Pest Management BMPs, Colorado Department of Agriculture, 1997.

Friendly Pesticides for Home GardensColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

High Plains Pest Management Guide for Colorado-Western Nebraska-Wyoming.  Cooperative Extension Services of Colorado State University, University of Wyoming, and University of Nebraska, 1998.

Homeowner’s Guide, Alternative Pest Management for the Lawn and GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2002.

Homeowner’s Guide to Pesticide Use Around the Home and GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2002.

Household Insects of the Rocky Mountain States.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, University of Wyoming Extension, and Montana State University Extension, 1994.

Insect Control:  Horticultural OilsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2005.

Insect Pest Control in Colorado Organic Vegetable GardensColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Insect Pests of Landscape Plants.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1970.

Integrated Pest Management Practices in Colorado.  Colorado State University Department of Bioagricultural Service and Pest Management, 1997.

Landscape Insect and Mite Pest Management Guide, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1988.

Outdoor Vertebrate Pest Control.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2008.

Preventing Plant Diseases in the Vegetable GardenColorado State University Extension Service, 1979.

Residential/Commercial Pest Control.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2006.

Safe Pesticide HandlingColorado State University, High Plains Intermountain Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, 1998.

Vegetable Crop Pests.  Colorado State College Extension Service, Farm Victory Program, 1943.

Vegetable Garden HintsColorado Master Gardener Program, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Weed and Insect Impacts in Colorado and the Costs and Impacts of Biocontrol.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2001.

By Plant Type

Alfalfa

Alfalfa:  Weeds, Diseases, InsectsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1999.

Alfalfa WeevilColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2011.

The Alfalfa Weevil in ColoradoColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1933.

Aphids in AlfalfaColorado State University Extension, 2011.

Management of the Alfalfa Leaf-Cutter Bee in Colorado.  Colorado State University Experiment Station, 1972.

Survival of Several Alfalfa Varieties Seeded on Irrigated Land Infested with Bacterial WiltColorado State College Experiment Station, 1938.

Beans

Dry Bean Production & Pest Management.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2015.

Western Bean Cutworm:  Characteristics and Management in Corn and Dry BeansColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Berries

Currants, Gooseberries, and Jostaberries for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1993.  

Raspberries for the Home GardenColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Strawberries for the Home GardenColorado State University Extension, 2009.

Corn

Ecology and Control of Spider Mites on Corn in Northeastern Colorado.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1983.

European Corn BorersColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1986.

Management of European Corn Borer with Bt Corn Hybrids in Eastern ColoradoColorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1999.

Management of Spider Mites in CornColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1986.

Managing Corn Pests with Bt CornColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2010.

Spider Mites in CornColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Sweet Corn for the GardenColorado State University Extension Service, 2003.

Sweet Corn Insect ControlColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1986.

Western Bean Cutworm:  Characteristics and Management in Corn and Dry BeansColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Western Corn RootwormColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers, Pumpkins, Squash, and MelonsColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Eggplant

Peppers and EggplantColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Flowers

Insect Control in the Flower GardenColorado State University Extension Service, 1982.

Tobacco (Geranium) BudwormColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Grapes

Colorado Grape Growers’ GuideColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1998.  Includes chapter on vineyard pest management/control.

Insect and Mite Pests Associated with West Slope Wine Grapes.  Colorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1994.

Greenhouse/houseplants

Fungus Gnats and as Houseplant and Indoor PestsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2009.

Greenhouse WhiteflyColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Household Insect Pests:  Characteristics and ControlColorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1981.

Household Insects of the Rocky Mountain States.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, University of Wyoming Extension, and Montana State University Extension, 1994.

Household Pest Control:  Pesticide Application and Safety Training Guide.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 1981.

Household PesticidesColorado State University, Colorado Environmental Pesticide Education Program, 2006.

Insect Control:  Soaps and DetergentsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Interior Plant Pest Control.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2006.

Managing Houseplant PestsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Lawns

Clover and Other Mites of TurfgrassColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Insect Management Recommendations for Turf and Ornamentals.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 2004.

Leafhoppers on LawnsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Sod Webworms and Cutworms in LawnsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1989.

Turf Insects:  Pesticide Application and Safety Training Guide.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 1981.

Turf Pest Control.  Colorado Department of Agriculture, 2015.

Turfgrass Insects in Colorado & Northern New Mexico.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1996.

Leafy Greens

Leafy Vegetable Crops for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1989.

Melons

Cucumbers, Pumpkins, Squash, and MelonsColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Onions

Colorado Insecticide Trials for Control of Thrips on Onions, 1995-2006Colorado State University Agricultural Exp
eriment Station, 2006.
 
Colorado Onion Production and Integrated Pest Management, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1995.

Onion Thrips:  Characteristics and ControlColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Onions and Related Species for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1991.

Peas

A Bacterial Stem Blight of Field and Garden PeasColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1916.

Peppers

Peppers and EggplantColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Potatoes

Best Management Practices for Integrated Pest Management in the San Luis Valley:  Potato. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1996.

Colorado Potato PestsColorado State College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1941.

Controlling Colorado Potato PestsColorado State College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1937.

Potato Flea-Beetle ControlColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1933.

Potato or Tomato PsyllidsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Potatoes for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Psyllid Control on Potatoes and Tomatoes in the Victory GardenColorado State College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1943.

The Tomato Psyllid and the Control of Psyllid Yellows of PotatoesColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1934.

Pumpkins and Squash

Cucumbers, Pumpkins, Squash, Muskmelons, and Watermelons for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Squash Bugs:  Management in Home GardensColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2008.

Trees and Shrubs

Aphids on Shade Trees and OrnamentalsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2004.

Boxelder BugsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Conifer Seed BugsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Control of Some Scale Insects Infesting Colorado Trees and Shrubs.  Colorado Agricultural College, Office of the State Entomologist, 1924.  

Douglas-Fir Tussock MothsColorado State University Extension, 2009.

Elm Leaf BeetlesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Emerald Ash BorerColorado State Forest Service, 2011.

Insect and Mite Pests of HoneylocustColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Insects and Diseases of Woody Plants in Colorado.  Colorado State University Extension, 2014.

Insects and Diseases of Woody Plants of the Central Rockies.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2000.

Insects that Feed on Colorado Trees and ShrubsColorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1993.

Leafmining InsectsColorado State University Extension, 2009.

Management Recommendations for Insect Pests of Trees and Shrubs.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1995.

Oystershell ScaleColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Pine Needle ScaleColorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1986

Pinyon Pine Diseases and InsectsColorado State University Extension, 2009.

Scale Insects Affecting ConifersColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Spruce Bark BeetleColorado State Forest Service, 2002.

What’s Ailing Your Aspen?  Common Insects and Diseases of AspenColorado State Forest Service, 2004.

White Pine WeevilColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Zimmerman Pine MothColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Fruit Trees

Apple and Pear InsectsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

A Cherry Pest in ColoradoColorado Agricultural College Experiment Station, 1932.

Colorado Tree Fruits Pest and Crop Management GuideColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1997; 1
999 update
.

Stone Fruit InsectsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2005.

Tomatoes

Potato and Tomato PsyllidsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Psyllid Control on Potatoes and Tomatoes in the Victory GardenColorado State College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1943.

Recognizing Tomato ProblemsColorado State University Extension, 2009.

The Tomato Psyllid and the Control of Psyllid Yellows of PotatoesColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1934.

Tomatoes for the Home GardenColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Wheat

Mites in WheatColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Wheat Production and Pest Management for the Great Plains Region.  Colorado State University Extension, 2010.

Wheat Stem Sawfly:  A New Pest of Colorado WheatColorado State University Extension, 2011.

By Pest Type

Aphids 

Alternate Host Plants of Russian Wheat Aphid in Colorado.  Colorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1997.

Aphids in AlfalfaColorado State University Extension, 2011.

Aphids on Shade Trees and OrnamentalsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2004.

Estimating the Correlation Between Fall and Spring Population Densities of the Russian Wheat AphidColorado State University Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, 2010.

Estimating Russian Wheat Aphid (Homoptera: aphididae) Overwintering Success Using Weather Data.  Colorado State University Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, 2010.

Honeysuckle Witches’ Broom AphidColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Occurrence of Russian Wheat Aphid (Homoptera: aphididae) on Non-Cultivated Grasses Within Colorado Montane EnvironmentsColorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011.

 
Bacillus Thuringiensis

Bacillus ThuringiensisColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Bees and Wasps

European Paper WaspColorado State University Extension, 2008.  

Leafcutter BeesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Management of the Alfalfa Leaf-Cutter Bee in Colorado.  Colorado State University Experiment Station, 1972.

Nuisance Wasps and BeesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Pigeon Tremex Horntail and the Giant Ichneumon WaspColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Beetles

An Annotated Bibliography of Thousand Cankers Disease, Including…Information on the Walnut Twig Beetle…  Colorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 2015.

Blister Beetles in Forage CropsColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Cereal Leaf Beetle:  Identification, Biology, and ManagementColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Elm Leaf BeetlesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Flea BeetlesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Japanese BeetleColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Lady BeetlesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Spruce Bark BeetleColorado State Forest Service, 2002.

Caterpillars, Larvae, and Segmented Worms 

ArmywormsColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Caterpillars in Small GrainsColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Field Key for Identification of Caterpillars Found on Field and Vegetable Crops in ColoradoColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1990.

Methods of Combatting Four Field Crop Pests in Colorado:  Beet Webworm, Alfalfa Webworm, Army Cutworm, Pale Western CutwormColorado
Agricultural College, Colorado Extension Service, 1921.

Sod Webworms and CutwormsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Tent-Making CaterpillarsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Tobacco (Geranium) BudwormColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2003.

Western Bean Cutworm:  Characteristics and Management in Corn and Dry BeansColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Western Corn RootwormColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Flies

Greenhouse WhiteflyColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.  

Wheat Stem Sawfly:  A New Pest of Colorado WheatColorado State University Extension, 2011.

Gnats

Fungus Gnats and as Houseplant and Indoor PestsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2009.

Grasshoppers
Grasshopper Control in Gardens and Small AcreagesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2008.

Leafhoppers on LawnsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Grubs

Billbugs and White GrubsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2005.


Ladybugs

Lady BeetlesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Mantids

Mantids of ColoradoColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Mites

Clover and Other Mites of TurfgrassColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Ecology and Control of Spider Mites on Corn in Northeastern Colorado.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1983.

Landscape Insect and Mite Pest Management Guide, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1988.

Management of Spider Mites in CornColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1986.

Mites in WheatColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Spider MitesColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Spider Mites in CornColorado State University Extension, 2010.

Moths

Douglas-Fir Tussock MothsColorado State University Extension, 2009.

Hornworms and “Hummingbird Moths.”  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Indian Meal MothColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Miller MothsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Pine Tip MothsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Snailcase BagwormColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.  (It’s neither a snail nor a worm.  It’s actually a moth).

Zimmerman Pine MothColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Nematodes (unsegmented worms)

Importance of Plant Parasitic Nematodes in Colorado CropsColorado State University Extension, 2011.

Insect Control with Insect Parasitic Nematodes.  Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Insect Parasitic NematodesColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Weird Worms:  Horsehair Worm and the Grasshopper NematodeColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Psyllids

An Annotated Bibliography of the Potato/Tomato PsyllidColorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1993.

Potato or Tomato PsyllidsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2007.

Psyllid Control on Potatoes and Tomatoes in the Victory GardenColorado State College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1943.

The Tomato Psyllid and the Control of Psyllid Yellows of PotatoesColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1934.

Scales

Control of Some Scale Insects Infesting Colorado Trees and Shrubs.  Colorado Agricultural College, Office of the State Entomologist, 1924.

Oystershell ScaleColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Pine Needle ScaleColorado State University Cooperative Extension Service, 1986.

Scale Insects Affecting ConifersColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2006.

Slugs

Attractiveness of Beer and Fermentation Products to the Gray Garden SlugColorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 1997.

Pear SlugsColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2004.

SlugsColorado State University Extension, 2008.

Squash Bugs

Squash Bugs:  Management in Home GardensColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2008.

Thrips

Colorado Insecticide Trials for Control of Thrips on Onions, 1995-2006Colorado State University Agricultural Experiment Station, 2006.

The Gladiolus Thrips in Colorado.  Colorado State College, Office of the State Entomologist, 1935.

Onion Thrips:  Characteristics and ControlColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 1994.

Weevils

Alfalfa WeevilColorado State University Cooperative Extension, 2011.

The Alfalfa Weevil in ColoradoColorado Agricultural College, Colorado Experiment Station, 1933.

Root WeevilsColorado State University Extension Service, 2006.

Sunflower Stem Weevil ManagementColorado State University Extension, 2010.

White Pine WeevilColorado State University Extension, 2008.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Planning and Planting Trees and Flowers

The season for planting trees and flowers has arrived.  If you’re planning a garden, or looking to update an established one, there are many questions to be thought through — such as what types and species are best for Colorado’s climate, how long they will take to grow, what kind of care they need, how to use mulch, how to deal with pests, what plants attract butterflies and birds, what’s different about gardening in the mountains, etc.  Luckily, the Colorado State University Extension can help.  They have issued numerous publications about all aspects of Colorado gardening.  Some of the titles that you may find useful in helping plan your yard and garden include:

Search our library’s web catalog for more titles, including information on specific plants, insects, and diseases.  Also, if you’re looking for ideas on flowers, check out CSU’s Flower Trial Gardens.  If you still need more help, you can go to the Extension’s Ask an Expert.

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Noxious Weeds in Colorado

The Colorado Department of Agriculture has a Noxious Weed Program whose mission is “to control noxious weeds, the nonnative invaders that replace native vegetation, reduce agricultural productivity, cause wind and water erosion and pose an increased threat to communities from wildfire.”  The program works with state and federal partners to control the spread of noxious weeds as well as educate the community on these invasive species.

Field bindweed, an invasive species in Colorado

The program’s website contains a wealth of information on noxious weeds in Colorado.  You can download a current list of invasive species; learn about early detection and rapid response; apply for grants; and more.  Click on Noxious Weed Mapping to find statewide distribution information on individual invasive species.  The Noxious Weed Species ID link provides numerous photos and other tools for identifying invasive species in the wild and on your property.  Here you can also download a mobile app to assist with identification in the field.

For more information on noxious weeds in Colorado, search our library’s web catalog using the keyword “noxious weeds.”  Some of the helpful resources you will find include:

Photo courtesy Colorado Department of Agriculture

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Dandelions

Dandelions everywhere!
They spring up along ditch banks,
crowd into open places in alfalfa fields,
or luxuriate in gardens and flower-beds.
They swarm over vacant city lots,
troop along the sidewalks,
and encroach upon lawns to the very door-stone
 of rich and poor alike.
This was written a century ago, but is just as true today!  The above quote is from the 1918 Colorado Experiment Station publication The Dandelion in ColoradoThis publication discussed experiments with the dandelion, including spraying with various forms of herbicide, good old-fashioned digging, and even applying gasoline!  Unfortunately, “it is evident from the foregoing that there is yet no easy, certain method known to the writer by which the dandelion may be exterminated and held in check for any considerable length of time.”  As this has seemingly not changed in the past century, it seems that dandelions will continue to be the scourge of our lawns for some time to come.
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Colorado State Publications Blog

Organic Fertilizers

It’s that time of year where many homeowners’ thoughts turn to lawn and garden care.  Fertilizing has long been recognized as an important part of keeping a lawn healthy, but increasingly many people are looking for green alternatives to chemical fertilizers.  The Colorado State University Extension has produced several publications about how to use organic fertilizers that are better for the environment, such as

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Colorado State Publications Blog

Caring for Colorado Lawns

Maintaining green grass can sometimes be a challenge in Colorado, which is prone to drought.  (In fact, in the early nineteenth century explorer Stephen Long called it the Great American Desert).  Our library has a number of resources that can help you keep your lawn healthy and verdant.  Check out these resources from the Colorado State University Extension, which provide information specific to Colorado lawns:

Finally, you can find out about watering restrictions in your area by going to http://www.coh2o.co/

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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    Growing Roses in Colorado

    Now is the time of year when most Colorado rose gardens are in full bloom.  Colorado’s soil and climate supports a number of rose varieties.  However, gardening in Colorado’s high altitude can pose some challenges.  If you’re new to rose gardening or just want some expert tips, see the following brochures from the Colorado State University Extenison:

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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    Emerald Ash Borer

    An invasive species that could mean the death of numerous trees has been found in Colorado.  The emerald ash borer targets ash trees and has caused the death of tens of millions of trees in the United States, according to the Denver PostAsh trees are common in Denver and the metropolitan area, so the insect could significantly reduce Colorado’s urban forests.  The first Colorado borer was found in Boulder last week.

    Homeowners and tree growers can find out more about the emerald ash borer by reading this brochure and fact sheet from the Colorado State University Extension.  Also, be sure to view this helpful and newly-updated emerald ash borer resource guide from the Colorado Dept. of Agriculture. 

    What are the signs of emerald ash borer infestation?  Look for D-shaped holes, sparse or thinning canopy, bark splitting, shoots sprouting from the trunk, and increased woodpecker activity.

    

    Emerald Ash Borer.  Photo courtesy Colorado State Forest Service.

    

    

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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    New Website for Colorado Watering Restriction Information

    Are you confused by your local watering restrictions, which keep changing based on the state’s drought conditions?  Fortunately, the Colorado Water Conservation Board has eliminated this confusion by introducing a single, centralized website with information on watering restrictions for all Colorado customers.  Simply go to the website, http://www.coh2o.co/, and search by city, county, or zip code to find out your local watering rules.  There’s much more on the site, too — including a drought meter, information on maintaining healthy landscapes during drought, and information on snowpack and reservoir storage.
     
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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    Drought Resources

    Explorer Stephen Long called Colorado “the Great American Desert,” and true to his observation, the state is currently experiencing a  severe drought.  This map from the USDA shows what parts of the country are currently experiencing drought, and all of Colorado is highlighted, with the metro area and north central part of the state under “moderate” drought conditions while other parts are “severe,” “extreme,” or “exceptional,” as is the case for southeastern Colorado.  For more information on drought in Colorado see the Colorado Drought Mitigation and Response Plan and Historical Perspectives on Colorado DroughtFor resources on dealing with drought at your home or farm, these publications from the Colorado State University Extension can be particularly useful:

    Other drought-related publications available from our library include:

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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    Water Conservation

    Denver Water is talking about possible watering restrictions in the midst of this drier-than-usual spring.  If you’re interested in learning more about conserving water at your home, the following publications (available from our library) might be helpful to you:

    For more publications, search our web catalog.

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    Colorado State Publications Blog

    CSU Flower Trials

    Having trouble deciding which flowers to plant in your garden this year?  Colorado State University can help.  Every year they present their annual Trial Garden, a beautiful outdoor display where visitors can learn about what flowers work best in Colorado.  If you can’t make it up to the Fort Collins campus, you can always peruse a list of the results and annual winners in each category on the Flower Trial Garden website.  You can also find copies of their annual reports at our library.

    2011’s best in show was the Argryanthemum “Flutterby Yellow.”