Categories
Boom Years

Otto Mears: Pathfinder of the San Juans

When: 1840 – 1931 Where: Born in Russia and came to America at the age of 11. Why Important: Built 450 miles of toll roads that later became most of the modern roads in southwestern Colorado.  He also built three railroads in the San Juan Mountains that helped develop the area’s mining wealth. Biography Otto Mears was […]

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

DU’s Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus Student Newspapers Join the CHNC!

As our list of university newspapers continues to grow, the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection is pleased to welcome some very special additions to our online catalog. The Weekly Peanut and The Hesperus, the University of Denver’s first and second (respectively) student newspapers are now available at ColoradoHistoricNewspapers.org and they are even more unique and interesting […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Festival of Mountain and Plain

In 1895, Coloradans were looking for something to lift their spirits. Two years before, the state had been devastated by the worst economic crisis in its history. But after a couple of years had passed, the state was slowly recovering. So, what better way to boost morale and celebrate Colorado’s resilience than with a giant […]

Categories
Colorado Historic Newspapers

Topics in History: The Coffee Myth and the Power of Advertising

In today’s health obsessed culture of fit watches and online trainers, it seems that most Americans should have a pretty solid grasp on what is and is not good for them. However, with the constant inundation of “new studies” and “fitness breakthroughs,” it can be tough to tell what is really new information and what […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The Colorado Traveling Library Commission

In 1903 the Colorado Legislature passed an act creating the Colorado Traveling Library Commission. Appointed by the governor, the commission consisted of five volunteers from Colorado women’s clubs who oversaw the shipment of boxes of books to Colorado schools and towns. The program’s goals were to create a “love and habit of reading good books” […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

How Geology Helped Build the Moffat Road

Our library recently received a fascinating new document for our collection that will be of interest to historians researching Colorado’s railroads as well as to those interested in our state’s geology and mineral resources. Exactly one hundred years ago, in 1918, a special committee of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association asked State Geologist Russell […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

1918 Influenza

Cañon City High School students don masks during the 1918-19 pandemic. Photo courtesy History Colorado. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great Spanish influenza pandemic that claimed the lives of an estimated 50 million people worldwide — more people than died in combat in both World Wars combined. I have several relatives who […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Baseball in Colorado

A new exhibit at the History Colorado museum, Play Ball!, brings in some amazing artifacts to tell the story of the nation’s pastime. In conjunction with the exhibit, the two most recent issues of History Colorado’s Colorado Heritage magazine include numerous articles on the history of Colorado baseball. The Spring 2018 issue looks at how […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The Colorado Attorney General

A.J. Sampson, Colorado’s first state Attorney General. The Attorney General of Colorado is an elected official tasked with “represent[ing] and defend[ing] the legal interests of the people of Colorado and its sovereignty.” The Attorney General’s Office — comprised of the elected Attorney General and the state’s Department of Law — serves as legal counsel for […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Colorado Biographies

Genealogists and others looking for biographical information on Coloradans from earlier than 1927 should view volumes 4 and 5 of the State Historical Society’s History of Colorado, which has been digitized by our library. These final two volumes of the five-volume set are filled with hundreds of biographies on Coloradans. While many of these biographies […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: The History of Colorado's Highways

Today we take for granted the fact that highways can take us pretty much anywhere we want to go. But in the first half of the 20th century, that wasn’t the case. As automobiles grew in popularity, the need arose for a system of highways that could support ever-increasing numbers of vehicles. While the construction […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Historical Population Trends

In a recent Time Machine Tuesday I wrote about some of our library’s digital documents that tell the story of population changes – and the need for water – over the last twenty years. This week, our digital documents go back quite a bit further, to examine population trends back to Colorado territorial days. In […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Researching the Hispanic Experience in Colorado

If you’re researching the history of Colorado’s Hispanic community, the University of Colorado Denver has put together a helpful resource that can serve as an excellent starting place for your research. The Hispanic Colorado Resource Guide “identifies resources providing perspectives on the diverse experiences of Hispanics in Colorado — who they are, where they came […]

Categories
Touring Colorado's Collections

Touring Colorado’s Collections: Greetings from Southwest Colorado!

Today quick messages and family updates are sent by text message, Facebook, Instagram or other social media posts.  But before social media and cell phones, postcards were the most popular way for friends and family to quickly and easily communicate with each other.  Even though postcards are not as widely used as they were during […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Postcards from Southwestern Colorado

Bird’s-eye view of Durango, circa 1907-1914. In today’s world of social media and instant communication, the postcard has become a lost art. But the basic idea is the same – the desire to share pictures and updates with friends and family while you’re apart. A century ago, postcards were a popular and cheap way to […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Colorado Yule Marble

Lincoln Memorial. Did you know that the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. are constructed of marble quarried here in Colorado? The stone comes from the Colorado Yule Marble quarry in the Crystal River valley near Marble, between Aspen and Carbondale. Colorado Yule marble, named for nearby Yule Creek, […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Summer Floods

As hot and dry as it has been so far this summer, it’s hard to believe that most of Colorado’s floods — the September 2013 floods being a significant exception — occur in June and July. In our library you can find many resources on the history of flooding in Colorado. Many flood events are […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Colorado Place Names

Did you know that the name of Golden has nothing to do with gold? What name is Calhan a misspelling of? How many ladies in Park County could the town of Alma have possibly been named for?  In the early 1940s, the Colorado Historical Society published A to Z listings of Colorado place names and […]

Categories
Touring Colorado's Collections

Touring Colorado’s Collections: Pine River Library and the Stories of Bayfield, CO

A small town with a long history is a community with stories to tell; stories of hard times and harsh winters, but also of optimism and opportunity. Families who have lived for generations in Bayfield, Colorado are the keepers of their community’s stories and tell the tales of homesteaders, ranchers, farmers, and the railroad, to […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: "Mineral and Water Resources of Colorado," 1968

Fifty years ago Colorado’s two U.S. Senators, Gordon Allott and Peter Dominick, requested the State of Colorado and the U.S. Geological Survey to publish Mineral and Water Resources of Colorado.  “The importance of both of these vital resources to the economic well-being of Colorado cannot be overestimated,” Allott wrote in the report’s foreword.  “I requested […]

Categories
Colorado State Publications Blog

Time Machine Tuesday: Native American Rock Art

Petroglyphs in Mesa Verde National Park. If you are exploring the rural areas of western Colorado you may see some examples of rock art created by prehistoric cultures.  According to the Colorado Historical Society’s 1984 publication Northwest Colorado Prehistoric Context,  “rock art sites are of two types: pictograph and petroglyphs.  Rock art panels can range […]